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Re: Problems with Kids today...

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  • Mike Jansen
    Dear List, I m sure that most of you know our unit commander Calvin Arnt. He is a teacher at Eden High School in St. Catharines, Ont. He doesn t talk about
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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      Dear List,
      I'm sure that most of you know our unit commander Calvin Arnt. He is
      a teacher at Eden High School in St. Catharines, Ont. He doesn't talk
      about his work too much, but I know that if I ever want to get him
      going, all I have to do is ask him how things are going at the school.
      I'm sure to get a tirade which, if listened to, will convince many
      that the school system in Ontario is just not what it used to be.
      Similarly, my brother is a teacher at a Christian school in Jordan,
      Ont and in a recent conversation, he informed me that he is
      considering moving to another career. His reason was, and I quote
      "The kids these days are just too stupid. Parents forget that
      education begins in the home and they expect the teachers to teach
      absolutely everything and require nothing of themselves at all."
      I recall my mother teaching me at home when I was a wee gaffer. By
      the time I started Grade 1, I could read, write, and even do the
      basics in math. My brother has reported that many of his students (he
      teaches Grade 4) cannot read, cannot write, and cannot pay the least
      bit of attention in class, preferring to talk about their latest X-Box
      game instead. I know my brother well enough to know that he doesn't
      inflate things as a rule. That being the case, heaven help the future
      generations!
      I remember teachers when I was young that went out of their way to
      teach more than the basic curriculum. I can trace my interest in the
      War of 1812 to my Grade 7 teacher who made the whole thing sound so
      interesting that I wanted to study it on my own when that unit was
      done. These kinds of things just don't happen any more it seems...

      Just my two cents worth,

      Cheers!!
      Mike Jansen
      1st Lincoln Militia
    • John Ogden
      All, As I observed previously (or was that on RevListe, there are parallel exchanges going on on both lists), I became interested in history generally during
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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        All,
        As I observed previously (or was that on RevListe, there are parallel
        exchanges going on on both lists), I became interested in history generally
        during the AWI Bicentennial (celebrated 1976-1981, although the war
        stretched on before and after the exact mirror dates of two centuries
        earlier) when I saw the reenactors as a child. My exact interests as a
        reenactor have evolved over the intervening years, but the general interest
        in the world before it became mine has endured. As for whether or not we're
        going to see another generation of reenactors, I would like to state that
        nobody in my family reenacts (aside from myself and hopefully some day my
        son). I joined because I wanted to, and had some support from my family
        (psychologically and they've learned to give me gift certificates to sutlers
        and similar suppliers for Christmas and my birthday) because my Dad approved
        thanks to his interest in genealogy. Other young men will probably have
        similar experiences without growing up in the hobby. The biggest concerns
        are, and always will be, economic.
        The amount of specialized equipment required to put together a kit is
        mind-boggling for the novice, and taken as a lump sum is a very significant
        investment, especially as the US dollar hits historic lows and the requisite
        firearms are all made overseas. I realize as I write this that many
        list-members are Canadian, and so are less worried about the value of the US
        dollar than I am, but the point is still valid: this period's reenacting
        community spans the border, and what impacts one side of the lakes impacts
        the other side as well, if only in terms of turnout for events. This
        required investment scares off many potential reenactors (I've spoken to
        three myself).
        The next economic hurdle is that unless one lives along the Great
        Lakes, along the Upper Chesapeake Bay or near New Orleans, there is a
        probably a long drive to get to any event. With gas again above $3 US per
        gallon and likely to reach $4 US per gallon by summer, unless we all start
        carpooling it's going to become extremely expensive to reach the field this
        year. Maybe some sort of ride-share network could be established to combat
        this, but it would necessarily entail packing fewer creature comforts and
        tent litter than we traditionally do. My estimation, based purely on
        personal observation and no hard empirical research is that in order for me
        to go to Ft. Niagara or Ft. Erie would require a minivan and two companions
        to be cost effective, presuming gas prices as above. The minivan is just to
        accomodate tents and coolers: if we go campaigner I can fit two other
        people, muskets, maintenance box, blanket rolls and some small creature
        comforts (1 large cooler for food and a case of warm beer, to be cooled
        on-site) in my PT Cruiser. It all depends on how attached to the air
        mattress you are.
        Well, there's my rant, slightly off-point in places, but it's what I
        see as the biggest challenges faced by reenacting generally, and our period
        in particular, over the next few years. Just my thoughts, really. I am and
        remain as always...

        Your servant,



        On 2/27/08, Mike Jansen <mikedeajansen@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear List,
        > I'm sure that most of you know our unit commander Calvin Arnt. He is
        > a teacher at Eden High School in St. Catharines, Ont. He doesn't talk
        > about his work too much, but I know that if I ever want to get him
        > going, all I have to do is ask him how things are going at the school.
        > I'm sure to get a tirade which, if listened to, will convince many
        > that the school system in Ontario is just not what it used to be.
        > Similarly, my brother is a teacher at a Christian school in Jordan,
        > Ont and in a recent conversation, he informed me that he is
        > considering moving to another career. His reason was, and I quote
        > "The kids these days are just too stupid. Parents forget that
        > education begins in the home and they expect the teachers to teach
        > absolutely everything and require nothing of themselves at all."
        > I recall my mother teaching me at home when I was a wee gaffer. By
        > the time I started Grade 1, I could read, write, and even do the
        > basics in math. My brother has reported that many of his students (he
        > teaches Grade 4) cannot read, cannot write, and cannot pay the least
        > bit of attention in class, preferring to talk about their latest X-Box
        > game instead. I know my brother well enough to know that he doesn't
        > inflate things as a rule. That being the case, heaven help the future
        > generations!
        > I remember teachers when I was young that went out of their way to
        > teach more than the basic curriculum. I can trace my interest in the
        > War of 1812 to my Grade 7 teacher who made the whole thing sound so
        > interesting that I wanted to study it on my own when that unit was
        > done. These kinds of things just don't happen any more it seems...
        >
        > Just my two cents worth,
        >
        > Cheers!!
        > Mike Jansen
        > 1st Lincoln Militia
        >
        >
        >



        --
        John J. Ogden
        Hanley School of Law
        Duquesne University
        Class of 2011

        "Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity
        in exclusion of all other religions may establish, with the same ease, any
        particular sect of Christians in exclusion of all other sects?" -- James
        Madison, June 20, 1785


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Hardwick
        All, I think the gas crunch will have an effect on most and the cost of goods at events are sure to rise to keep pace. I am more that willing to share my Dodge
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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          All,

          I think the gas crunch will have an effect on most and the cost of goods at events are sure to rise to keep pace. I am more that willing to share my Dodge quad-cab and its truck bed to go to events. I live in Hattiesburg, MS and will go to the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. If anyone is between here and there I can pick you up on the way and we can share some cost of the fuel. Contact me offline if you are interested.

          James

          P.S. This could be a good way to make new friends (even if they be dressed in the wrong colors).

          John Ogden <johnjogden@...> wrote:
          All,
          As I observed previously (or was that on RevListe, there are parallel
          exchanges going on on both lists), I became interested in history generally
          during the AWI Bicentennial (celebrated 1976-1981, although the war
          stretched on before and after the exact mirror dates of two centuries
          earlier) when I saw the reenactors as a child. My exact interests as a
          reenactor have evolved over the intervening years, but the general interest
          in the world before it became mine has endured. As for whether or not we're
          going to see another generation of reenactors, I would like to state that
          nobody in my family reenacts (aside from myself and hopefully some day my
          son). I joined because I wanted to, and had some support from my family
          (psychologically and they've learned to give me gift certificates to sutlers
          and similar suppliers for Christmas and my birthday) because my Dad approved
          thanks to his interest in genealogy. Other young men will probably have
          similar experiences without growing up in the hobby. The biggest concerns
          are, and always will be, economic.
          The amount of specialized equipment required to put together a kit is
          mind-boggling for the novice, and taken as a lump sum is a very significant
          investment, especially as the US dollar hits historic lows and the requisite
          firearms are all made overseas. I realize as I write this that many
          list-members are Canadian, and so are less worried about the value of the US
          dollar than I am, but the point is still valid: this period's reenacting
          community spans the border, and what impacts one side of the lakes impacts
          the other side as well, if only in terms of turnout for events. This
          required investment scares off many potential reenactors (I've spoken to
          three myself).
          The next economic hurdle is that unless one lives along the Great
          Lakes, along the Upper Chesapeake Bay or near New Orleans, there is a
          probably a long drive to get to any event. With gas again above $3 US per
          gallon and likely to reach $4 US per gallon by summer, unless we all start
          carpooling it's going to become extremely expensive to reach the field this
          year. Maybe some sort of ride-share network could be established to combat
          this, but it would necessarily entail packing fewer creature comforts and
          tent litter than we traditionally do. My estimation, based purely on
          personal observation and no hard empirical research is that in order for me
          to go to Ft. Niagara or Ft. Erie would require a minivan and two companions
          to be cost effective, presuming gas prices as above. The minivan is just to
          accomodate tents and coolers: if we go campaigner I can fit two other
          people, muskets, maintenance box, blanket rolls and some small creature
          comforts (1 large cooler for food and a case of warm beer, to be cooled
          on-site) in my PT Cruiser. It all depends on how attached to the air
          mattress you are.
          Well, there's my rant, slightly off-point in places, but it's what I
          see as the biggest challenges faced by reenacting generally, and our period
          in particular, over the next few years. Just my thoughts, really. I am and
          remain as always...

          Your servant,

          On 2/27/08, Mike Jansen <mikedeajansen@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear List,
          > I'm sure that most of you know our unit commander Calvin Arnt. He is
          > a teacher at Eden High School in St. Catharines, Ont. He doesn't talk
          > about his work too much, but I know that if I ever want to get him
          > going, all I have to do is ask him how things are going at the school.
          > I'm sure to get a tirade which, if listened to, will convince many
          > that the school system in Ontario is just not what it used to be.
          > Similarly, my brother is a teacher at a Christian school in Jordan,
          > Ont and in a recent conversation, he informed me that he is
          > considering moving to another career. His reason was, and I quote
          > "The kids these days are just too stupid. Parents forget that
          > education begins in the home and they expect the teachers to teach
          > absolutely everything and require nothing of themselves at all."
          > I recall my mother teaching me at home when I was a wee gaffer. By
          > the time I started Grade 1, I could read, write, and even do the
          > basics in math. My brother has reported that many of his students (he
          > teaches Grade 4) cannot read, cannot write, and cannot pay the least
          > bit of attention in class, preferring to talk about their latest X-Box
          > game instead. I know my brother well enough to know that he doesn't
          > inflate things as a rule. That being the case, heaven help the future
          > generations!
          > I remember teachers when I was young that went out of their way to
          > teach more than the basic curriculum. I can trace my interest in the
          > War of 1812 to my Grade 7 teacher who made the whole thing sound so
          > interesting that I wanted to study it on my own when that unit was
          > done. These kinds of things just don't happen any more it seems...
          >
          > Just my two cents worth,
          >
          > Cheers!!
          > Mike Jansen
          > 1st Lincoln Militia
          >
          >
          >

          --
          John J. Ogden
          Hanley School of Law
          Duquesne University
          Class of 2011

          "Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity
          in exclusion of all other religions may establish, with the same ease, any
          particular sect of Christians in exclusion of all other sects?" -- James
          Madison, June 20, 1785

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John McGarry
          My interest in history had very little to do with my teachers, and was usually in spite of them. My Grade 12 Canadian history teacher INSISTED that the
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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            My interest in history had very little to do with my teachers, and was
            usually in spite of them. My Grade 12 Canadian history teacher
            INSISTED that the Hessians were French soldiers employed by the
            Americans to fight the hated redcoats.
            And she made us watch "Revolution" with Al Pacino.

            John McGarry
            Royals Lights
          • Chris McKay
            That explains a lot, actually...
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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              That explains a lot, actually...

              --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "John McGarry" <johnmcgarry1@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > My interest in history had very little to do with my teachers, and was
              > usually in spite of them. My Grade 12 Canadian history teacher
              > INSISTED that the Hessians were French soldiers employed by the
              > Americans to fight the hated redcoats.
              > And she made us watch "Revolution" with Al Pacino.
              >
              > John McGarry
              > Royals Lights
              >
            • Mike Learoyd
              ... Q. What do you call a teacher that graduated at the bottom of his/her class? A. A teacher. I know my grand kids have some good teachers at their school. I
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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                --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "John McGarry" <johnmcgarry1@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > My interest in history had very little to do with my teachers, and was
                > usually in spite of them. My Grade 12 Canadian history teacher
                > INSISTED that the Hessians were French soldiers employed by the
                > Americans to fight the hated redcoats.
                > And she made us watch "Revolution" with Al Pacino.
                >
                > John McGarry
                > Royals Lights
                >

                Q. What do you call a teacher that graduated at the bottom of his/her
                class?

                A. A teacher.

                I know my grand kids have some good teachers at their school. I also
                know there are a few duds too.
                I hope my passion for history influences them in a good way.
                If a teacher made my kids watch Revolution with Al Pacino I would
                consider it child abuse.

                Mike Learoyd
              • John Ogden
                All, While I never actually considered it in that light, I can generally agree that being forced to watch Pacino s ... [Non-text portions of this message have
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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                  All,
                  While I never actually considered it in that light, I can generally
                  agree that being forced to watch Pacino's

                  > Revolution would constitute some form of child abuse. I'm not sure what
                  > the corresponding tort would be, though. Possibly intentional infliction of
                  > emotional distress?
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > John J. Ogden
                  > Hanley School of Law
                  > Duquesne University
                  > Class of 2011
                  >
                  > "Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity
                  > in exclusion of all other religions may establish, with the same ease, any
                  > particular sect of Christians in exclusion of all other sects?" -- James
                  > Madison, June 20, 1785
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Geoff
                  As a practicing teacher, I thought I might offer some insight. The teaching profession is like any other, and the level of dedication, skill and other
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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                    As a practicing teacher, I thought I might offer some insight.

                    The teaching profession is like any other, and the level of dedication,
                    skill and other qualities varies from person to person. I would love it
                    if all my students shared my interest in history, that simply is not
                    the case. I often hear how upset people are regarding the fact "____%
                    of students don't know ________," but the reality of the situation is
                    complicated.

                    I think we have a strong program at my school. Good kids, interesting
                    subjects. One must also remember that in the grade ten class (the only
                    mandatory history class at the high school level) we must get through
                    100 years in 5 months. That may seem like a lot of time, but I can
                    assure you it is not. The nature of the human brain is to forget what
                    it does not hold to be important. The reality is that a year later much
                    of that instruction will be lost if the student does not place value in
                    it. The best we can do is to attempt to show them the value!

                    As someone else stated on this list, are most important task is to
                    teach these kids how to think critically, and write effectively. That
                    is usually my focus. This semester, if I can teach my grade 10 academic
                    students only ONE lesson, I hope it is how to write a persuasive essay
                    properly.

                    In closing, I raised a student 1812 drill team this year, and they are
                    working on a routine for an annual reenactment in my area. They are
                    hoping to win the drill competition against the other three
                    participating schools, and I can assure you at least some students in
                    this province have a very strong affinity for 1812 and the heroes
                    familiar to us.

                    sincerely,

                    Geoff Audas
                    World Studies Teacher
                    ENSS, Brighton, ON
                  • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                    In a message dated 2/27/2008 7:44:02 PM Central Standard Time, PrivateCannon@hotmail.com writes: And she made us watch Revolution with Al Pacino ... The
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 27, 2008
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                      In a message dated 2/27/2008 7:44:02 PM Central Standard Time,
                      PrivateCannon@... writes:

                      And she made us watch "Revolution" with Al Pacino


                      ------------------------------------------

                      The horror. the horror.



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                      (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mark Dickerson
                      Are your students interested in participating in our drill competition at Longwoods this year? Might put some of us to shame.. Mark Dickerson From:
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 28, 2008
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                        Are your students interested in participating in our drill competition at
                        Longwoods this year? Might put some of us to shame..



                        Mark Dickerson





                        From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                        Of Geoff
                        Sent: February 27, 2008 11:52 PM
                        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [War Of 1812] Re: Problems with Kids today...




                        In closing, I raised a student 1812 drill team this year, and they are
                        working on a routine for an annual reenactment in my area. They are
                        hoping to win the drill competition against the other three
                        participating schools, and I can assure you at least some students in
                        this province have a very strong affinity for 1812 and the heroes
                        familiar to us.

                        sincerely,

                        Geoff Audas
                        World Studies Teacher
                        ENSS, Brighton, ON





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Dale Kidd
                        ... The last high school history class I took (some 25 years ago), I had a teacher who would drone on in a monotone for 40 minutes at a time. Hardly inspiring.
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 28, 2008
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                          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "John McGarry" <johnmcgarry1@...>
                          wrote:
                          > My interest in history had very little to do with my teachers, and was
                          > usually in spite of them.


                          The last high school history class I took (some 25 years ago), I had a
                          teacher who would drone on in a monotone for 40 minutes at a time.
                          Hardly inspiring. I regarded his class as an opportunity to catch up on
                          lost sleep. I dropped history from my curriculum the following year. I
                          resent that man far more today than I did at the time, because I
                          recognize that he robbed me of what ought to have been an introduction
                          to my country's fascinating history.

                          The only way history can be taught effectively is by teachers who have
                          a passion for the subject, and practice innovative and interactive
                          teaching methods. Otherwise, it becomes the driest of subjects, and the
                          content is usually forgotten five minutes after the final exam.

                          ~Dale
                        • peter monahan
                          Teachers Salary Teachers hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It s time we put things in perspective and pay them
                          Message 12 of 15 , Feb 29, 2008
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                            Teachers' Salary

                            Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9
                            or 10 months a year!

                            It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do--
                            babysit!

                            We can get that for less than minimum wage. Right? Let's give them
                            $3.00 an hour and pay them for the hours they actually work, not any
                            of that silly planning time.

                            That would be $19.50 a day (7:00 AM to 3:30 (or so) PM with just 25
                            min. off for lunch).

                            Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit
                            their children.

                            NOW...

                            How many do they teach in a class, 30? So that's $19.50 x 30 =
                            $585.00 a day.

                            However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! We're not going
                            to pay them for any vacations.

                            LET'S SEE....

                            That's $585 x 180= $105,300 per year.
                            What about those special teachers and the ones with master's degrees?
                            Well, we could pay them minimum wage, and just to be fair, round it
                            off to $7.00 an hour.

                            That would be $7 x 6 1/2 hours x 30 children x 180 days = $245,700
                            per year.

                            Wait a minute--there's something wrong here!

                            Average teacher salary
                            $50,000/180 days = $277/per day/30 students = $9.23/6.5 hours = $1.42
                            per hour per student.

                            A very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even try - with your help -
                            to EDUCATE your kids!

                            WHAT A DEAL.... And the parents don't even have to buy us pizza!

                            Peter Monahan -a History teacher :7)
                          • James Hardwick
                            I need that salary. How many hours do we spend grading papers, doing lesson plans, field trips, seminars, and the countless in-service days. James 6th Grade;
                            Message 13 of 15 , Feb 29, 2008
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                              I need that salary. How many hours do we spend grading papers, doing lesson plans, field trips, seminars, and the countless in-service days.


                              James

                              6th Grade; Math, Science, and Social Studies

                              peter monahan <petemonahan@...> wrote:
                              Teachers' Salary

                              Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9
                              or 10 months a year!

                              It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do--
                              babysit!

                              We can get that for less than minimum wage. Right? Let's give them
                              $3.00 an hour and pay them for the hours they actually work, not any
                              of that silly planning time.

                              That would be $19.50 a day (7:00 AM to 3:30 (or so) PM with just 25
                              min. off for lunch).

                              Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit
                              their children.

                              NOW...

                              How many do they teach in a class, 30? So that's $19.50 x 30 =
                              $585.00 a day.

                              However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! We're not going
                              to pay them for any vacations.

                              LET'S SEE....

                              That's $585 x 180= $105,300 per year.
                              What about those special teachers and the ones with master's degrees?
                              Well, we could pay them minimum wage, and just to be fair, round it
                              off to $7.00 an hour.

                              That would be $7 x 6 1/2 hours x 30 children x 180 days = $245,700
                              per year.

                              Wait a minute--there's something wrong here!

                              Average teacher salary
                              $50,000/180 days = $277/per day/30 students = $9.23/6.5 hours = $1.42
                              per hour per student.

                              A very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even try - with your help -
                              to EDUCATE your kids!

                              WHAT A DEAL.... And the parents don't even have to buy us pizza!

                              Peter Monahan -a History teacher :7)






                              ---------------------------------
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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Tom Hurlbut
                              Love it, guys!! Teachers are often under-appreciated. Major Tom, son of a teacher, son-n-law of a teacher, grandson of a teacher, married to a teacher..
                              Message 14 of 15 , Mar 1, 2008
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                                Love it, guys!! Teachers are often under-appreciated.

                                "Major" Tom,
                                son of a teacher, son-n-law of a teacher, grandson of a teacher, married to a teacher..



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • DAVE COCKBURN
                                son, son n law, grandson, & married to a teacher. the question is, have you learned anything {LOL} Rooster Tom Hurlbut wrote: Love it,
                                Message 15 of 15 , Mar 1, 2008
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                                  son, son n law, grandson, & married to a teacher. the question is, have you learned anything {LOL}
                                  Rooster

                                  Tom Hurlbut <hurlbut8646@...> wrote:
                                  Love it, guys!! Teachers are often under-appreciated.

                                  "Major" Tom,
                                  son of a teacher, son-n-law of a teacher, grandson of a teacher, married to a teacher..

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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