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Re: [War Of 1812] Question related to Photo on site

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  • Colin
    Thank You Kind Sir Congrats on the well deserved promotion!! and I will soon be in touch concerning trousers.. YHOS Colin Murphy USS CON 1812 MG USMC-HC ...
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 28, 2008
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      Thank You Kind Sir

      Congrats on the well deserved promotion!!

      and I will soon be in touch concerning trousers..
      YHOS
      Colin Murphy
      USS CON 1812 MG
      USMC-HC

      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Steve Abolt <sacbg7@...> wrote:
      >
      > Colin,
      >
      > Good afternoon.
      >
      > The US army did not issue individual overcoats, or
      > "greatcoats", to soldiers until 1816. Prior to that
      > time each company was assigned watch coats limited to
      > 5 or more per company. The watch coat was to be used
      > for those standing watch, or guard, and exposed for
      > long periods to the elements.
      >
      > Its length would naturally preclude easy marching.
      > The weight would also tend to become troublesome to
      > the shoulders after long periods of wearing. I have
      > experienced this first hand with my personal
      > greatcoat. The weight of the body fabric, lining and
      > three capes, without a mid section belt support
      > becomes quite distressful. Our Sgt. Maj. experienced
      > the same problem with his surtout, also made of heavy
      > goods. He remedied this by wearing his sword belt
      > over the coat.
      >
      > The coat was constructed of lion, sometimes listed as
      > lyon skin. This is a shaggy, heavily milled cloth
      > designed to shed water. Fearnought, another thick
      > cloth is also mentioned.
      >
      > The cape was long, unlike the 1816-51 issue for
      > individual soldiers. It was also cut in the
      > Spanish,style, meaning here a full circle of cloth.
      > The coat, cape and sleeves were lined.
      >
      > The 1st US Infantry before the war were authorized to
      > make individual blanket coats for the men. A
      > description of these coats are found in the standing
      > orders for the Regiment. There is a more detailed
      > description in the order by Secretary of War Dearborn.
      >
      > For winter wear soldiers were to wear their vests with
      > sleeves, herewith meaning the gray roundabout, under
      > their uniform coats. Callendar Irvine, US Commissary
      > General of Purchases would remind cutters that the
      > uniform coats were to be cut slightly larger to
      > accommodate the roundabout underneath.
      >
      > Not every regiment received watch coats. Returns for
      > the 7th INF after the battle of New Orleans lists not
      > a single watch coat issued or in stores.
      >
      > Men would sometimes receive an extra blanket and
      > fashion coats of their own.
      >
      > All the best,
      > S.
      >
      > --- Colin <usmarine1814@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I know the Marine Corps issued only one watchcoat
      > > for every 5 men or
      > > so. What was the US Army watchcoat issue?
      >
      >
      > Cottonbalers, By God!
      >
      > visit our website at www.cottonbalers.lynchburg.net
      >
      >
      >
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