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Re: [War Of 1812] Orderss For Boatwork

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  • BritcomHMP@aol.com
    Give Way Together Leaning back, and using the body more than the arms, the oarsmen dip their blades and begin to pull in an easy rhythm, lifting the blade
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 28, 2008
      Give Way Together
      Leaning back, and using the body more than the arms, the oarsmen dip their
      blades and begin to pull in an easy rhythm, lifting the blade clear of the
      water when recovering, and following the speed and rhythm set by the Stroke
      Oar, the oarsman closest to the coxswain.
      ------------------------------------

      These orders are exactly the same ones I learned in the Sea Cadets in the
      1960s BUT there were a couple of small refinements in the above order.
      The order was given 'Give Way, Together'

      Give Way
      All oars are dipped in the water and the coxwain observes that all oarsmen
      are dipped and ready to pull.

      Together
      The oarsmen pull in absolute unison guided by the stroke (this took a long
      time to master on our first day as I remember, however once we had it mastered
      the whole thing went "Give Way (beat) Together").

      Also during the pulling we were told it weas very imprtant to feather the
      oars during the stroke which was done by cocking the wrist back as soon as the
      blade leaves the water, this reduces wind resistance onthe oars HOWEVER it is
      most important that the wrist (and blade) is returned to its original
      position before the bade re-eners the water.

      The Eaton Boating song

      Jolly boating weather,
      And a Hay harvest breeze,
      Blade on the feather,
      Shade of the trees.

      So we'll all pull together,
      Our bodies between our knees,
      We'll all swing together
      Our bodies between our knees.

      Harrow may be more aincent,
      Rugby may make more row,
      But we'll all swing together,
      Steady from stroke to prow.

      And Nothing in life shall sever
      The chain that is round us now,
      Nothing in life shall sever,
      The chain that is round us now.

      Of course the future Duke of Wellington hated his time at Eaton, which might
      be why he (and so many others who went there) joined the army!

      Cheers

      Tim



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