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[War Of 1812] Re: Sore feet! Considerations for the Queenston ramble

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  • James Yaworsky
    ... wrote: [snip] While the soldiers of 1812 weren t marching on asphalt they ... was that they were wearing wool socks. ... There s another difference too. I
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 30 7:29 AM
      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Windsor" <kevin.windsor@...>
      wrote:
      [snip] While the soldiers of 1812 weren't marching on asphalt they
      > did march on more than dirt roads and fields. The main difference
      was that they were wearing wool socks.
      >

      There's another difference too. I remember the first Stoney Creek
      'death march' (199?) - I personally made it, hobbling over the "finish
      line" - but I lost three toenails and wore sandals for two months
      afterwards in the process... when I took my brogans off when I got
      home (I knew I couldn't take them off at the event and hope to get
      them back on), my wife was horrified to notice all the dried (and not
      so dried) blood...

      What I got from that experience was a true appreciation for why there
      was a five minute halt every hour, and why such a march was done at
      the "at ease" and at a fairly moderate pace. Because in the 199?
      march, we kept speeding up to "get it over with", and although three
      stops had been planned, we were all too stupid to actually rest at the
      first stop (Hamilton City Hall), and we voted to skip the third stop
      ("let's get this over with!").

      In effect, we literally marched ourselves in to the ground.

      Moderate pace and 5 minute break every hour, during which you sit
      down, maybe remove your boots, wool socks, and wipe your feet as Kevin
      suggests - that's the ticket to arriving in one piece and fit to
      engage in combat!

      Jim Yaworsky
      41st
      Stoney Creek Death March survivor
    • peter monahan
      I appreciate the sensible responses to this post, though I can be a butt with the best of them. (Insert Sgt Major joke here). So, my last volley on this
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
        I appreciate the sensible responses to this post, though I can be a
        butt with the best of them. (Insert Sgt Major joke here). So, my last
        volley on this field:

        I too am a wearer of WOOL SOCKS - CF issue, actually, thanks to my
        daughter's short sojourn in the Army Cadets. And I do confess that my
        shoes are just a touch large and slip. BUT... it's the HOBNAILS!

        Even the heel cleats aren't so bad if the socks are thick and the shoes
        fit but marching on hard surfaces - asphalt, stone, concrete - with a
        generously hobbed sole is akin to smacking your foot with a small metal
        hammer every step of the way. And, yes, thick socks help. But, in my
        humble opinion, not enough! Re-read Jim's post! 'Nuff said.
      • Tom Fournier
        Another thought: Try a a store that specializes in hiking gear. They have wonderful wool socks designed to protect your feet. I had also come across a
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
          Another thought:

          Try a a store that specializes in hiking gear. They have wonderful
          wool socks designed to protect your feet. I had also come across a
          wonderful little thing called sock liners ... a very light sock worn
          under the wool that reduces the friction on your feet.

          They sure saved my feet on a 70 km hiking trek over 5 days!

          Tom
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