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Sore feet! Considerations for the Queenston ramble

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  • peter monahan
    I m going to stick my neck out here - both by offering un-asked-for advice and by risking the slings and arrows of unsympathetic friends while confessing my
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 26, 2007
      I'm going to stick my neck out here - both by offering un-asked-for
      advice and by risking the slings and arrows of unsympathetic friends
      while confessing my inadequacies as a 'hard core' re-enactor.

      On Saturday last I walked 13 km in period kit About 50% of that was
      on pavement or hard packed road shoulder and the other half on
      walking trails - good, dry dirt. I was wearing "Jefferson" style -
      low cut buckle shoes - with "Hungarian" hobnails (ie: the small ones)
      and full horsehsoes on the heels. Shoes fit well and my pack was
      only half full (25-30 pounds?).

      Results: one very sore foot (no blister but a bruise) and the
      beginnings of shin splints, I think. Some of you may recall
      the "death march" from Chippew to Ft Erie about a decade ago. 30
      miles on paved paths. Very bad news for a number of people!

      [Pause for shouts of derision or groans of sympathy and a snappy
      remark from L2]

      As somebody who's in ok shape, for walking at least, has good shoes
      and great insoles, I would respectfully suggest that anyone planning
      the Queenston hike in period shoes think seriously about wearing
      modern footwear instead. Sorry, progressive types! In 1812 nobody
      marched on asphalt or cobbles for miles and mostof them walked a H**l
      of a lot farther in a day than many of us do in a week!

      My tuppence worth and change!

      Peter Monahan, Sgt, Cobbler and footsore grunt
    • Larry Lozon
      Peter mMnahan wrote: Pause for . . . a snappy remark from L2 Sergeant Major Monahan I have no comment As one with a bad foot I feel for your pain Yrs., L2
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 26, 2007
        "Peter mMnahan" wrote:

        Pause for . . . a snappy remark from L2




        Sergeant Major Monahan

        I have no comment

        As one with a bad foot
        I feel for your pain

        Yrs.,
        L2
      • terry1813
        Peter, I participated in the Chippewa death march and managed to get through it with no major foot problems. I wore brogans with a thick pair of wool socks. No
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 29, 2007
          Peter,
          I participated in the Chippewa death march and managed to get through
          it with no major foot problems. I wore brogans with a thick pair of
          wool socks. No blisters.


          Terry
        • Kevin Windsor
          Therein lies the rub! (pun intended!) Most people today wear poly/cotton/elastic sport socks. They are NOT good for marching. While the soldiers of 1812
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 29, 2007
            Therein lies the rub! (pun intended!)

            Most people today wear poly/cotton/elastic sport socks. They are NOT good
            for marching. While the soldiers of 1812 weren't marching on asphalt they
            did march on more than dirt roads and fields. The main difference was that
            they were wearing wool socks.



            For those of you going on the Queenston march please take note. WEAR WOOL
            WORK SOCKS!!! You may think, "I can't wear them, my feet will sweat, blah
            blah blah!" well I got news for you! Your feet will sweat anyway so your
            choice is sweat in natural fibres that soak it in, or sweat in poly that
            holds the water between your sock and feet and have your foot slipping
            around.



            The best thing to do is wear wool socks and tighten your shoes. Nothing
            will rub and you won't get blisters. Every time you stop take off your
            shoes and give your feet a wipe and put them back on.



            I have been only wearing wool socks for almost 20 years and the only time I
            ever had a blister was walking 45 km (28 miles) in one day.



            KW/89



            _____

            From: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of terry1813
            Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2007 12:37 PM
            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [War Of 1812] Re: Sore feet! Considerations for the Queenston
            ramble



            Peter,
            I participated in the Chippewa death march and managed to get through
            it with no major foot problems. I wore brogans with a thick pair of
            wool socks. No blisters.

            Terry



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James Yaworsky
            ... wrote: [snip] While the soldiers of 1812 weren t marching on asphalt they ... was that they were wearing wool socks. ... There s another difference too. I
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 30, 2007
              --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Windsor" <kevin.windsor@...>
              wrote:
              [snip] While the soldiers of 1812 weren't marching on asphalt they
              > did march on more than dirt roads and fields. The main difference
              was that they were wearing wool socks.
              >

              There's another difference too. I remember the first Stoney Creek
              'death march' (199?) - I personally made it, hobbling over the "finish
              line" - but I lost three toenails and wore sandals for two months
              afterwards in the process... when I took my brogans off when I got
              home (I knew I couldn't take them off at the event and hope to get
              them back on), my wife was horrified to notice all the dried (and not
              so dried) blood...

              What I got from that experience was a true appreciation for why there
              was a five minute halt every hour, and why such a march was done at
              the "at ease" and at a fairly moderate pace. Because in the 199?
              march, we kept speeding up to "get it over with", and although three
              stops had been planned, we were all too stupid to actually rest at the
              first stop (Hamilton City Hall), and we voted to skip the third stop
              ("let's get this over with!").

              In effect, we literally marched ourselves in to the ground.

              Moderate pace and 5 minute break every hour, during which you sit
              down, maybe remove your boots, wool socks, and wipe your feet as Kevin
              suggests - that's the ticket to arriving in one piece and fit to
              engage in combat!

              Jim Yaworsky
              41st
              Stoney Creek Death March survivor
            • peter monahan
              I appreciate the sensible responses to this post, though I can be a butt with the best of them. (Insert Sgt Major joke here). So, my last volley on this
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
                I appreciate the sensible responses to this post, though I can be a
                butt with the best of them. (Insert Sgt Major joke here). So, my last
                volley on this field:

                I too am a wearer of WOOL SOCKS - CF issue, actually, thanks to my
                daughter's short sojourn in the Army Cadets. And I do confess that my
                shoes are just a touch large and slip. BUT... it's the HOBNAILS!

                Even the heel cleats aren't so bad if the socks are thick and the shoes
                fit but marching on hard surfaces - asphalt, stone, concrete - with a
                generously hobbed sole is akin to smacking your foot with a small metal
                hammer every step of the way. And, yes, thick socks help. But, in my
                humble opinion, not enough! Re-read Jim's post! 'Nuff said.
              • Tom Fournier
                Another thought: Try a a store that specializes in hiking gear. They have wonderful wool socks designed to protect your feet. I had also come across a
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
                  Another thought:

                  Try a a store that specializes in hiking gear. They have wonderful
                  wool socks designed to protect your feet. I had also come across a
                  wonderful little thing called sock liners ... a very light sock worn
                  under the wool that reduces the friction on your feet.

                  They sure saved my feet on a 70 km hiking trek over 5 days!

                  Tom
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