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Proctor: Wampum Denied

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  • James Yaworsky
    ... I supplied a transcript of the Proctor court martial to Sandy Antal when he was writing the book and when he was down at Fort Malden for the launch of A
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 27, 2007
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      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "J.Bruce Whittaker" <ortheris@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I read "A Wampum Denied: Procter's War of 1812" by Sandy Antall last
      > year. If I recall correctly Procter wasn't totally villified. The book
      > does discuss how short supplied Procter was and other circumstances
      > that were beyond his control.
      > Regards,
      > Bruce Whittaker
      >


      I supplied a transcript of the Proctor court martial to Sandy Antal
      when he was writing the book and when he was down at Fort Malden for
      the launch of "A Wampum Denied", he came over to dinner at my house.
      We spent a pleasant evening discussing mainly Proctor.

      There are no major and probably very few minor errors of fact in this
      book. However, Sandy will be the first to admit that he wrote it as
      an exercise to put the case for Proctor in as favourable a light as
      the evidence could justify - not as an attempt to give a balanced,
      neutral assessment of Proctor's War of 1812.

      So, be aware that some of the interpretations of the facts that are
      presented are "stretched" to fit the book's thesis. Other, more
      plausible interpretations can be advanced on many of the arguments
      made. Sandy is the first to admit this, too.

      However, I do agree with Sandy that given the prevalence of works that
      actually vilify Proctor and take the criticism way too far and in to
      factually incorrect terrain, that "A Wampum Denied" serves as a very
      useful and necessary counterbalance!

      As usual, the truth probably lies somewhere between the blind
      prejudices of the worst of the critical works of Proctor, and the
      elegant vindications advanced in "A Wampum Denied"... Of the two
      extremes, I personally think "A Wampum Denied", because it is grounded
      in solid scholarship and debunks many myths about Proctor and the
      operations of the Right Division, is the more useful read.

      Jim Yaworsky
      41st
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