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Re: bridges on the Thames

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  • Glenn Stott
    Dear Jim Re: Bridges over the River Thames Robert MacAffee s Diary is in the Journal of Kentucky History, for 1927-1928 He was an officer with Johnson s
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 28, 1999
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      Dear Jim
      Re: Bridges over the River Thames

      Robert MacAffee's Diary is in the Journal of Kentucky History, for 1927-1928
      He was an officer with Johnson's mounted rifles at Moraviantown. He wrote a
      diary which details , including maps, the campaign leading and following
      Moraviantown. A manuscript copy of this diary is found in the Regional
      Room, JJ Talman Library, UWO,
      At Chatham he states there " was a large bridge across the mouth of the
      right hand fork and a mill and bridge about a mile and a half up the fork
      where the Indians were encampt..." Following the skirmish with the Indians,
      they proceeded five miles further up and came to a steep ravine where the
      bridge was "thrown down" and they filled the ravine with fence rails and
      crossed. They proceeded three miles to Arnold's mills.(Louisville). They
      waited for the infantry so that they could carry them across on their horses
      to the north side of the river. I had always heard and I think read in an
      OHS article about the crossing being at Kent Bridge. There was also a
      bridge over the ravine at Moraviantown, which was installed in 1797-1798.
      According to the descriptiuons of the battle of Longwoods there was a wooden
      bridge across 20 Mile Creek. The Moravian Diaries recount bridges being
      built across many of the streams flowing into the Thames. John Howison in
      1819 recounts a story of a bridge, east of Wardsville which was beyond
      repair. George Ward mentions that they forded the Thames River at Delaware
      on March 4, 1814. Howison in 1819 talked of being ferried across the Thames
      at Delaware. My information about east of Delaware is scarce except that
      the Grand River was ferried across, not a bridge. In Nov., 1814, Capt. Muir
      of the 41st destroyed the ferry, to prevent McArthur from using it to get
      across, because the Grand was too deep and swift to ford. Hope this helps.

      Glenn Stott>
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