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Battle of Georgian Bay

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  • Sean
    If you can get past some of the timeline inaccurracies this event is exceptional. There were mixed units of Rev. War and 1812 and even a few from Civil War
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 16, 1999
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      If you can get past some of the timeline inaccurracies this event is
      exceptional. There were mixed units of Rev. War and 1812 and even a few
      from Civil War (they dressed as fuzzies) and everything worked
      fantastically. There were no problems with safety at all. At least nothing
      glaring that I can recall. This probably had a lot to do with the way
      command structure was designed.

      There was an overall field commander for both sides with a light commander
      and someone to keep the fuzzies and militia in line under him. Individual
      unit command was left to the commanding officer/NCO of the unit. Dave
      Brunelle, one of the event organizers, was on the British side as an
      officer and Tom Hurlbut was on the American. They worked with the OC's to
      keep things moving along safely and kept in touch with each other by
      portable radio. They made no command decisions on the field but could make
      suggestions to the OC. This negated any chance of confusion.

      Despite differences in drill and tactical doctrine both sides and time
      periods worked well with the OC making his intentions for maneouver know
      and the unit CO's carrying it out. This might sound confusing but the
      battles were fast moving, fluid and exciting.

      You're best to forward your questions directly to Dave Brunelle (although
      he is a member of this list) but this was one of the best events I have yet
      attended and I've been re-enacting for a loooong time.



      Sean Hirst
      Corporal - Royal Newfoundland Reg't, Lt. Coy
      Private - Glengarry Light Infantry
      *********************************
      945-0591
    • Bateman, Andrew
      From: Sean There were mixed units of Rev. War and 1812 and even a few from Civil War (they dressed as fuzzies) ... Andrew writes:
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 16, 1999
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        From: Sean <shirst@...>

        There were mixed units of Rev. War and 1812 and even a few from Civil War
        (they dressed as fuzzies) ... <snip>

        Andrew writes:

        What's a "fuzzy"? I've been in Civil War a long time but I've never
        knowingly dressed as a "fuzzy"...
      • David Brunelle
        Dear fellow re-enactors, Check out the Battle of Georgian Bay website! new pictures! on line registration! updated itenirary etc.
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 10, 2000
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          Dear fellow re-enactors,

          Check out the Battle of Georgian Bay website! new pictures! on line
          registration! updated itenirary etc.


          www.battleofgeorgianbay.huronia.com


          Questions or concerns let me know!

          Dave Brunelle
          Chairman - Battle of Georgian Bay, 2001
        • David Brunelle
          Dear Fellow Re-enactors, The Battle of Georgian Bay website has many new features including, video footage, tall ship page, updated schedules and much more.
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 15, 2000
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            Dear Fellow Re-enactors,

            The Battle of Georgian Bay website has many new features including, video footage, tall ship page, updated schedules and much more. You can also register online and see everybody else who has registered for the event. Take a look and let me know what you think! Comments and suggestions are welcomed!

            David Brunelle
            Chairman
            Battle of Georgian Bay


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Larry Lozon
            ... From: Scott Jeznach Is this an 1812 Re-enactment or is this a Revolutionary War Re-enactment? Scott: Yep! We have debated this event
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 13, 2000
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              -----Original Message-----
              From: Scott Jeznach <scottj@...>

              Is this an 1812 Re-enactment or is this a
              Revolutionary War Re-enactment?



              Scott: Yep!

              We have debated this event before and
              have come to the conclusion that it can
              be called a Rev-1812 Timeline (sort of).

              ______________________________


              >Andrew writes:
              >I admit I'm torn about whether or not to go
              >because by all accounts it's a good party ...

              Yes Andrew, et all:

              If it's a good time y'a want
              and you do Time Lines .....

              this is definitely the
              event for you ........

              The attendants at the last one almost rioted 'cause
              they were not gunna have it the next year!
              It was a GREAT TIME!
              ___________________________________

              Scott wrote:


              Due to logistics, we can only plan on one Canadian
              event a year. In the past , we've enjoyed our trips to
              Fort George, Fort Erie, etc.


              Scott: Knowing you and yours, you would be better off
              attending the Lundy's Lane 2001 thingie ........



              The comment was made during the last discussion about
              this event that, and it was agreed to take it as it is
              presented ..... "fiction".


              In my humble opinion,






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jason Everett
              I throughly enjoyed myself at the last event. There never was any pretense that it was an historic event , and even the what if scenerio is a bit of a
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 14, 2000
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                I throughly enjoyed myself at the last event. There never was any
                pretense that it was an "historic event", and even the "what if"
                scenerio is a bit of a stretch.

                On the other hand, without inviting Rev war units, you're not going
                to get the number of reenactors. Even the biggest War of 1812 events
                wind up with a limit on what can be done due to the small number of
                participants. One of the drawbacks of strictly "historical"
                reenactments, is that it can become a bit of a staged play - when you
                know exactly what's going to happen next, the experience losses
                something - at least when you've done it 10, 15, or more years
                running.

                It's also a great opportunity to do things you wouldn't normally get
                to do, or if you do, it's limited to a small scale. I consider
                taking part in landings, etc., as a lesson in experiencing some of the
                things I've only read about, but were done by the soldiers of the
                period.

                And yes, it was one hell of a party!

                Among the first to sign up and already champing at the bit.

                R. Jason Everett,
                (Capt. Incorp. Militia)
              • John-Paul Johnson
                Wow! Just checked the BGB 2001 site for updates etc and am quite pleased to see that the number of pre registered people just broke ONE THOUSAND! That wknd is
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 3, 2001
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                  Wow!

                  Just checked the BGB 2001 site for updates etc and am quite pleased to
                  see that the number of pre registered people just broke ONE THOUSAND!

                  That wknd is going to be GREAT!

                  J-P Johnson
                  Royal Nfld Reg't

                  --------------
                  J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/

                  Battle of Georgian Bay Website:
                  http://www.battleofgeorgianbay.huronia.com/
                • Larry Lozon
                  From: Lloyd Gower ... ................................ Yes Lloyd Dave Brunelle and his committee of volunteers deserve a huge HUZZAH for a
                  Message 8 of 16 , Aug 27, 2001
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                    From: Lloyd Gower <agower@...>


                    > I would like to commend all the people involved in the
                    > planning and conducting of the Battle of Georgian Bay.

                    ................................

                    Yes Lloyd

                    Dave Brunelle and his committee of volunteers deserve a
                    huge HUZZAH for a GREAT event!

                    It was the best picnic ever held for re-enactors,
                    F&I, Rev, 1812 and American Civil War re-enactors all coming
                    together to choreograph fantastic sea and land battles.

                    Wasn't it a Party!

                    I hope all arrived home safe........ n' tired.......*
                  • easeufe@aol.com
                    In a message dated 8/27/01 9:41:44 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Will the next Penetang include Vikings to assist the naval landings and the Lancaster from
                    Message 9 of 16 , Aug 27, 2001
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                      In a message dated 8/27/01 9:41:44 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                      lalozon@... writes:


                      > It was the best picnic ever held for re-enactors,
                      > F&I, Rev, 1812 and American Civil War re-enactors all coming
                      > together to choreograph fantastic sea and land battles.
                      >
                      >

                      Will the next Penetang include Vikings to assist the naval landings and the
                      Lancaster from Hamilton for air support? 8^)

                      Ed Seufert, LCpl
                      1812 Royal Marines
                      1st Co/2nd Batt RM



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • petemonahan@aol.com
                      Ed No, absolutely no Vikings allowed! We ve got enough irregulars already :^). We are, however, hoping for several cohorts of Romans and a company of Swiss
                      Message 10 of 16 , Aug 27, 2001
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                        Ed

                        No, absolutely no Vikings allowed! We've got enough irregulars already :^).
                        We are, however, hoping for several cohorts of Romans and a company of Swiss
                        pikemen. Oh, yes, and a squadron of motorized hang gliders for close air
                        support. In appropriate colours, of course. :^)

                        Your most H & Ob't.
                        Peter Monahan, Penetang. Royal Newfs
                      • Larry Lozon
                        From: easeufe@aol.com ... lalozon@netrover.com wrote: It was the best picnic ever held for re-enactors, F&I, Rev, 1812 and American Civil War re-enactors all
                        Message 11 of 16 , Aug 28, 2001
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                          From: easeufe@...

                          --------------------------------------

                          lalozon@... wrote:

                          It was the best picnic ever held for re-enactors,
                          F&I, Rev, 1812 and American Civil War re-enactors all coming
                          together to choreograph fantastic sea and land battles.

                          easeufe@... wrote:

                          Will the next Penetang include Vikings to assist the naval landings and the
                          Lancaster from Hamilton for air support? 8^)
                          ..............................

                          Ed, no Vikings, but come to think of it there were some Scottish
                          Bravehearts types in the Clandestine Camping Area, but they
                          didn't attend as combatants, rather they stayed put and sold
                          their armour and swords. No Lancaster, but an ultra-light,
                          a few smaller planes as well as a hot air balloon did skim the
                          area taking photos.

                          This event was not far all, a few come to mind who would not even
                          look at the photos we took of it. Those, however, who like a well run
                          event, great battle scenarios, super camaraderie between all time lines
                          and national troops, the ability to meet old and new friends, win great
                          prizes FREE!, hear great entertainment, a great collection of American
                          and Canadian sutlers, have a very well run camping area with super
                          clean and maintained porta-potties hidden in huge marquees, clean food
                          booths such as a local bakery & restaurant, Subway, Pizza Nova, Upper
                          Canada Brewery, etc., hot showers, et more, it was the event for you.

                          Like my first posting on this matter states,

                          " ... It was the best picnic ever held for re-enactors, ......

                          ... F&I, Rev, 1812 and American Civil War re-enactors all
                          coming together to choreograph fantastic sea and land battles..."
                        • Richard Feltoe
                          Dear List, For those who dare to come , that was the slogan used by the event at Penetanguishine this past weekend and it was certainly appropriate. As one
                          Message 12 of 16 , Aug 28, 2001
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                            Dear List,
                            "For those who dare to come", that was the slogan used by the event at Penetanguishine this past weekend and it was certainly appropriate. As one who attended this event and seeing the various comments arising from this, I wanted to include my own hearty congratulations and kudos to Dave for pulling off one hell of a good time. I also would like to describe for those who did not attend some of the mixed elements of the weekend and I apologise in advance for the length of this message.

                            Having been at the previous event and seeing the mixed timelines in battle together (and not being overly impressed), I have to admit I was dubious about the historical integrity of this years event. However, the superb site, planned entertainment and the fact that my wife was intending to set up a blanket sale with Karen Posner of Past Reflections committed me to going. I have to admit I'm glad I did.

                            Having driven up the previous Sunday (In pouring rain) to set up the tentage and ensure a decent spot in the encampment (I knew it was going to be sardine city) we returned on Thursday to see a sea of canvas. From that point onwards until the Sunday night (except for official off-site activities) I was gratefully thankful that I did not have to leave once to secure additional ice / bread / or other sundry items that seem to require my leaving other events, due to the well-planned supplies obtained by the event co-coordinators. Full marks for that!

                            In a similar fashion, the toileting facilities were exemplary, with the possible niggle on behalf of our ladies that having a "Flushie" with ten stalls and urinals for the Guys and only two stalls for the "Gals" was somewhat of an imbalance that hopefully could be addressed at a future event.

                            I had determined that I would not be able to participate in the Balm Beach Battle (Thursday evening) as there were jobs to be done in camp, but from all I heard from my son Mark (who did go) it was a fun scenario.

                            I took the opportunity to wander the camp that evening and was a little concerned to see the confederate flag flying at several locations at what was supposed to be an "1812" event and felt the unit(s) concerned could have had a bit more respect for the events supposed historical setting, while the Rev war material was, at least historically feasible as "leftovers". However, all these "negatives" were wiped away by the majestic and formidable site of the Brig 'Niagara" mooring almost alongside our company street. To see that vessel illuminated by the last rays of the sun and then shortly afterwards silhouetted against the evening sky was a picture no artist or photograph could reproduce.

                            Friday was a good day for shopping and relaxing ( which was just as well as it was getting quite hot) until it was time to leave for Midland. As a member of the Battalion colour party we were one of the first to depart and we knew there would be a while to wait at the other end. What we did not expect was a route march from the drop off point to a piece of industrial wasteland, followed by nearly two hours of standing around while TV crews made a*7%%$les of themselves filming meaningless C*$p. (I've seen the taped broadcast and I've never seen such amateurish BS and inaccurate presentation as this bunch of clowns put out as news reporting, it made a mockery of everything we were trying to do and any sense of historical integrity).

                            Fortunately, once we got to do what we had come there for, namely present a battle, things improved dramatically. The American line looked formidable and even the discrepancies of costuming between the time periods soon disappeared in the smoke of battle. Unfortunately, the need to keep the colours safe forced our party to remain further back from the front lines than I would have liked. As a result, I was not able to see the flow of the fighting, but the retreat through the railway cutting and bush was a real rush as we constantly had to keep a watch that the American light troops did not infiltrate to our rear and threaten the colours.

                            Then we reached the open ground back near the bus drop off point, only to find that the public had completely crowded in on the pathway, thus completely blocking any further advance by our drums and the following units, or should I say retreat. Fortunately a quick port arms and an advance along the point of route seemed to do the trick as I and one of my recruits forced back the crowd enough to let the column through.

                            Now came the difficult process of conducting a battle along the main street, uphill, with the public crowding in on either side. From my elevated prospect I had the benefit of seeing much of the firing by both sides and it seemed to me that all units conducted themselves with a high degree of concern for both crowd and unit safety during this stage of the proceedings. Furthermore, this attitude was also voiced by the Mayor of Midland (who had accompanied the Colour party throughout the Battle). He was more than a little impressed by the safe way things were conducted throughout and said so on more than one occasion.

                            Having reached the designated point of surrender, I was detailed by the Sergeant Major to leave the colours and escort the gentleman to the Awaiting Americans. However, upon returning to the lines, imagine my mortification to find the colours GONE!. The British line was fully formed across the street but no sign of the colours.

                            However, knowing the 'Gentlemen' acting as Ensigns, I made a shrewd guess as to where to find them and sure enough momentarily saw the colours gracefully adorning the deck of the nearby bar and the two officers sitting comfortably having a drink (while the two enemy lines faced each other and occasional firing continued below their vantage point). Now if that doesn't show a proper appreciation of how far reenactors will sacrifice themselves to demonstrate how some of the other half (officers) lived, while their men fought and died, I just don't know what does. (NARF)

                            To conclude the evening, the march back down the hill to the loud cheers and applause of the crowds was stirring to say the least, and the speedy and efficient way in which the busses picked us up and returned us to the site was the epitome of excellent organisation. Not to mention the fantastic concert put on by Tanglefoot.

                            Saturday's morning battle in Penetang was another hurry up and wait after the busses moved us to our designated drop-off spot (right outside the town's funeral home). Fortunately there was no business being conducted at that moment and we took advantage of its large portico to shelter from the increasing heat and sun. We were waiting there for some time and it would appear that the Drum Major decided that as far as his musicians were concerned "Idle hands etc." He therefore began holding an impromptu practice and drumming session, right outside of the Funeral Home's main doors. Within seconds at least a dozen individuals had made the comment that "the noise was enough to wake the dead!" thus rendering everyone into helpless fits of laughter. This was shortly thereafter followed by equally humorous comments to those individuals using a handy water spout to fill their canteens and water bottles that " The tap comes straight from the preparation room".

                            Once the fighting began, we were constantly on the move, weaving our way around successive units and I was too busy to see much of anything, but from the noise and cheers of the crowd they certainly seemed to enjoy it all. The barricade was a great piece of theatrics, and after taking post well behind its position I was highly entertained to see the leading units manning the barricaded firing away to the musical accompaniment provided by of one of their members on a partially dismembered piano.

                            It was also a stirring sight to see the units halt the retreat and form up to man the barricade as each unit moved in to replace the ones that fired and retired. It looked great!.

                            Having reached the field of the final battle, however, the organisation seemed to stumble as there were absolutely no crowd barriers or lines and we were taken from a position of shade and stationed right out in the open for some time in the broiling sun, while the band from Washington did their "bit" for well over twenty minutes, or so it seemed to me.

                            The Battle was something of a mish mash and not up to the earlier action on the street leaving us just grateful to be off the field and expecting to be able to grab a break and a drink. Instead we were immediately taken on a broiling march a good distance down the empty street to the busses, instead of having them come to us at a fully accessible parking lot. Back at the site, however, the welcome benefit of an unlimited sized swimming pool (lake) allowed for a respite from the heat and exhaustion before climbing back into rig once again and returning to the purpose of our attending the event, namely talking to the public about history.

                            The night battle may have been spectacular for those who went on the boats, but for this individual it left much to be desired and was perhaps the disappointment of the weekend. The exact same failings of the previous event reoccured once again as there was no attempt to cordon off the crowd outside the gate, vehicles were parked everywhere and they expected us to fight a battle in this environment.

                            To be blunt it was neither appropriate as a venue or safe. I was horrified and mortified to see that while some groups (mainly 1812'ers) controlled their firing in close proximity to the public, others totally disregarded any sense of control or safety and ran directly through the public. This was so bad that in one case I witnessed an individual (Green-coated Rev War) kneel and fire from within the crowd while a family with small children was within three feet of his pan. He then stood and reloaded while one of the little ones could have easily reached into his cartridge box.

                            Fortunately this did not happen as the child in question was screaming with fear (from the proximity of the explosion) in his mothers arms and she was trying to console him. This idiot, for that is all one can deem him)seemed totally oblivious to the near injury he had caused and ran off to play "mountain goat" with the rest of his fellows over the top of the alley way at the back of the restaurant, leaving me shaking my head and sending up a prayer of thanks to the Safety fairy for a safe deliverance . Here we were held up for some time as there was no room to deploy as the fighting raged ahead of us and it got somewhat boring for me at least.

                            Finally getting into the open and working along the road things improved but the magic of that battle was lost for this reenactor with what I had witnessed outside the gate.

                            True to form with this event, however, the remainder of the evening with the show put on by Tanglefoot and the never ending paddle dance served to dispel the earlier situation and leave me with a good feeling at the end of the day.

                            Sunday's overcast skies, followed by downpours of rain only served to reinforce my determination to leave the "Iron Man" competition to the hardcore types (actually it was my recognition that this aging bod of mine didn't stand a chance against some of the young bucks that swung the balance)

                            Since the colours were not taken out on this final Battle, I had the chance to actually fire from the line for the first time during the event, and had a ball. My commendations to the "French" last stand, a glorious end, even if it did seem that some individuals wore Kevlar vests in the face of all the fictional lead that was being chucked in their direction, volley after volley. I for one was tempted to do the coup de grace with the bayonet, just to get past them.

                            Fortunately, after the battle we did not have to contend with the usual rush to pack and get away as we had previously decided to wait until the Monday to do things. For this I am doubly grateful as the weather cleared late in the day, which helped to dry the canvases and the following morning we watched as the "Niagara" slipped off into the bay by the light of the early morning sun, a gorgeous site and one that left me with a determination to be back in the line outside the gates waiting for access to the site when the next event is held.

                            Did the event have its problems?, Yes, Were there Farby's? Yes,
                            Did that invalidate the tremendous job done by the organisers to give us a great time NO! Would I recommend it for anyone the next time? ABSOLUTELY!!!!!.

                            The only thing we have to do is ensure that the word gets out enough in the 1812 and Napoleonic era associations to encourage them to come as replacement for the Civil War and Rev War groups, thus making sure the numbers of reenactors stay high while making it a proper time-relative event. Perhaps a new scenario, such as the following would encourage groups in Europe to consider coming over?

                            "The year is 1818, angry at their failure to expel the British from North America in 1812-1815, the American War Hawks concoct a scheme to rescue Napoleon from Ste Helena. Helped by ex-patriot Frenchmen living in the American south, they succeed in bringing Napoleon to the U.S. Whereupon he raises his standard and attracts many loyal troops from France and its former territories / allies. United with a renewed American Army, they then begin a series of probes into Canada, aiming to finally overrun the British and push them out of Canada in order (overtly) to establish a "New France" in Lower Canada. As part of this scheme they need to capture the new naval base at Penetanguishine to secure the Upper Lakes and establish a foothold for an eventual advance down the Ottawa River, thus bypassing Kingston (which is heavily defended) and leading the way for a multi pronged assault on Montreal and Quebec City."
                            (Hmmm, Methinks I feel an alternate history book coming on)

                            Finally, Getting back to the realities of the weekend, I want to stress again my heartfelt thanks and appreciation to Dave and his crew for all their hard work. Great Job Guys!

                            Regards Richard Feltoe
                            Colour Sergeant, Battalion. / Sergeant, Light Coy (No7) Incorporated Militia







                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Cpl. Wattie
                            Overall, I agree that it was an excellent event with more highlights than I can think of off the top of my head ... from Sgt-Maj. Lightfoot s unmentionables
                            Message 13 of 16 , Aug 28, 2001
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                              Overall, I agree that it was an excellent event with more highlights
                              than I can think of off the top of my head ... from Sgt-Maj.
                              Lightfoot's unmentionables flapping on the flagpole to those last two
                              volleys on Sunday from the entire British line (now THAT was a
                              battalion volley!)
                              Were I to nitpick, I would say that there seemed to be more waiting
                              around before the battles than was strictly necessary. I also agree
                              with Richard about the slightly crazy situation during the Saturday
                              night battle. And how about that bloody great Remax balloon in the
                              afternoon?!?
                              To mention a few points that haven't been raised elsewhere, I thought
                              the crowds were enthusiastic, appreciative and a pleasure to perform
                              for.
                              The barricade was certainly a highlight, but I'd like to applaud the
                              re-enactors (whomever they were) who had to cart the furniture,
                              including piano, from a local curling rink to the street.
                              As well, the toilet facilities were more than sufficient for the
                              numbers of happy campers and were kept clean all weekend, for which
                              the organizers deserve our thanks. Talk about a thankless job ...
                              Great work all 'round guys.
                            • PEGGY MATHEWS
                              To add a few comments from the French perspective... ... From: Richard Feltoe (big snip) I took the opportunity to wander the camp that evening and was a
                              Message 14 of 16 , Aug 28, 2001
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                                To add a few comments from the "French" perspective...

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Richard Feltoe

                                (big snip)
                                I took the opportunity to wander the camp that evening and was a little concerned to see the confederate flag flying at several locations at what was supposed to be an "1812" event and felt the unit(s) concerned could have had a bit more respect for the events supposed historical setting, while the Rev war material was, at least historically feasible as "leftovers". (snip)
                                Michael: I confess I had a big negative reaction when I saw them and expected, through my ignorance, wild and irresponsible behavior. However my fears were totally unjustified as I was impressed by their behavior, drill and discipline when I saw them in action. As you say though, the nature of much of the combat meant you missed a lot. But for my experience I was pleased to serve next to them. On the other hand, people for whom I automatically granted respect because of other periods I play disappointed or shocked me.
                                (bigger snip)

                                The night battle may have been spectacular for those who went on the boats, but for this individual it left much to be desired and was perhaps the disappointment of the weekend. The exact same failings of the previous event reoccured once again as there was no attempt to cordon off the crowd outside the gate, vehicles were parked everywhere and they expected us to fight a battle in this environment.

                                To be blunt it was neither appropriate as a venue or safe. I was horrified and mortified to see that while some groups (mainly 1812'ers) controlled their firing in close proximity to the public, others totally disregarded any sense of control or safety and ran directly through the public. This was so bad that in one case I witnessed an individual (Green-coated Rev War) kneel and fire from within the crowd while a family with small children was within three feet of his pan. He then stood and reloaded while one of the little ones could have easily reached into his cartridge box.

                                Fortunately this did not happen as the child in question was screaming with fear (from the proximity of the explosion) in his mothers arms and she was trying to console him. This idiot, for that is all one can deem him)seemed totally oblivious to the near injury he had caused and ran off to play "mountain goat" with the rest of his fellows over the top of the alley way at the back of the restaurant, leaving me shaking my head and sending up a prayer of thanks to the Safety fairy for a safe deliverance . Here we were held up for some time as there was no room to deploy as the fighting raged ahead of us and it got somewhat boring for me at least.

                                Finally getting into the open and working along the road things improved but the magic of that battle was lost for this reenactor with what I had witnessed outside the gate.
                                Michael: I left the above intact to emphasize that what Richard said is absolutely true. Even the "crowd control" people (volunteers so cut them some slack) didn't know what to do. I asked them to move some spectators back at one point because I knew that what I had seen would be repeated, and they shuffled them back about five feet. We moved them again. Finally, after one of those clumps of little green men fired on us at a range of about 15 feet I took the French off the field. I won't fault those who stayed, but for me remaining would have been saying it was okay with us. I passed our concerns along and they were addressed. I would hasten to add that I *never* witnessed any questionable behavior on the part of the 1812 units anywhere, anytime, anyplace.
                                (snip)
                                Since the colours were not taken out on this final Battle, I had the chance to actually fire from the line for the first time during the event, and had a ball. My commendations to the "French" last stand, a glorious end, even if it did seem that some individuals wore Kevlar vests in the face of all the fictional lead that was being chucked in their direction, volley after volley. I for one was tempted to do the coup de grace with the bayonet, just to get past them.
                                Michael: Actually, the bayonet was exactly what we wanted. I had spoken with Peter during officers call and thought it was all arranged. We were just going to collapse a step or two before the line reached us, you'd just sweep past and the crowd would think you the supermen you believe yourselves to be. ;-) Dying Hollywood style was just an ad lib. Hope someone got some pictures. As for Kevlar, the only Crown casualties I saw on that flank were two after the battle swept past us. We almost all bore bloody bandages before the end to keep the walking wounded idea going.

                                (snip)
                                Did the event have its problems?, Yes, Were there Farby's? Yes,
                                Did that invalidate the tremendous job done by the organisers to give us a great time NO! Would I recommend it for anyone the next time? ABSOLUTELY!!!!!.
                                Michael: Agreed on all counts.

                                The only thing we have to do is ensure that the word gets out enough in the 1812 and Napoleonic era associations to encourage them to come as replacement for the Civil War and Rev War groups, thus making sure the numbers of reenactors stay high while making it a proper time-relative event. Perhaps a new scenario, such as the following would encourage groups in Europe to consider coming over?

                                "The year is 1818, angry at their failure to expel the British from North America in 1812-1815, (snip interesting scenario)
                                Michael: Only problem with this would be that it would make it impractical to rationalize the leftover Rev War kits. And of course the numbers would be waaaaay down without them. Anyone hear a count of soldiers fielded?
                                Finally, Getting back to the realities of the weekend, I want to stress again my heartfelt thanks and appreciation to Dave and his crew for all their hard work. Great Job Guys!

                                (last snip)
                                Michael: How true, a Herculean effort worthy of our gratitude and appreciation. I can't imagine planning and executing such an event, even with three years to plan.
                                Michael Mathews, sergent commanding: 3e Cie, 1er Btn., 21e Regiment de Ligne


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Justin Blathwayt
                                SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM Shut up! Bloody Vikings All that aside, brilliant event. Congrats to Dave and everyone, and thanks !!! justin ... and the
                                Message 15 of 16 , Aug 29, 2001
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                                  SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM
                                  Shut up! Bloody Vikings

                                  All that aside, brilliant event. Congrats to Dave and everyone, and
                                  thanks !!!

                                  justin



                                  --- In WarOf1812@y..., easeufe@a... wrote:
                                  > In a message dated 8/27/01 9:41:44 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                                  > lalozon@n... writes:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > > It was the best picnic ever held for re-enactors,
                                  > > F&I, Rev, 1812 and American Civil War re-enactors all coming
                                  > > together to choreograph fantastic sea and land battles.
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > Will the next Penetang include Vikings to assist the naval landings
                                  and the
                                  > Lancaster from Hamilton for air support? 8^)
                                  >
                                  > Ed Seufert, LCpl
                                  > 1812 Royal Marines
                                  > 1st Co/2nd Batt RM
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • J.Bruce Whittaker
                                  Greetings All, I would just like to say thank you to Dave and his group of volunteers for the work they did bringing us the first two Battles of Georgian Bay.
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Apr 4 10:03 AM
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                                    Greetings All,
                                    I would just like to say thank you to Dave and his group of
                                    volunteers for the work they did bringing us the first two Battles
                                    of Georgian Bay. So, thanks Dave.
                                    J.Bruce Whittaker
                                    Norfolk Militia (Heritage Regiment)
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