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Re: [War Of 1812] British Drummers + Bearskins

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  • Tom Fournier
    ... Good question! I went back and checked the ratios on some of the others: 40 Sergeant Coats 40 Caps 4 Grenadier Caps 664 Rank and File Coats 664 Caps 80
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 1, 2007
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      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Luthien Tinuviel <rrbeckner@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > So it would seem that the drummers and fifers of the
      > grenadier company had both a shako and a bearskin (if
      > "grenadier cap" may be interpreted as bearskin)?
      > Perhaps the bearskins were only worn for special
      > occasions?
      >
      > Beck
      > Fifer, 89th Regt. Grenadier Coy.
      >


      Good question! I went back and checked the ratios on some of the
      others:

      40 Sergeant Coats
      40 Caps
      4 Grenadier Caps

      664 Rank and File Coats
      664 Caps
      80 Grenadier Caps

      The same seems to hold true - both the Grenadier Cap and a regular
      Cap for all ...

      Tom
    • BritcomHMP@aol.com
      In a message dated 01/01/2007 21:19:45 Central Standard Time, rrbeckner@yahoo.com writes: So it would seem that the drummers and fifers of the grenadier
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2007
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        In a message dated 01/01/2007 21:19:45 Central Standard Time,
        rrbeckner@... writes:

        So it would seem that the drummers and fifers of the
        grenadier company had both a shako and a bearskin (if
        "grenadier cap" may be interpreted as bearskin)?
        Perhaps the bearskins were only worn for special
        occasions?





        Not surprising really, Canada was a British possession, the army was not
        sent there to fight a campaign but was a native army defending its territory
        from an invader. As such all the troops there (pre invasion) would have been
        equipped for the formal ceremonies in such a station, including 'grenadier caps'
        (bearskins is a relatively modern term). Also remember that Sir George
        Prevost was well known for being a martinet so we can be sure that all formal
        ceremonies were carried out in the regulation dress, in fact there were Peninsula
        veterans who complained that Prevost was far more picky about such things
        than Wellington.

        Cheers,

        Tim


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