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Re: Canvas painting

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  • Scott Jeznach
    I once was told that linseed oil was the base for most weather-durable paint in the 18th and early 19th Century. Tint and color was provided from abundant
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 1, 1999
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      I once was told that linseed oil was the base for most weather-durable paint
      in the 18th and early 19th Century. Tint and color was provided from
      abundant local sources. Hence, barnyard red was linseed oil pigmented with
      animal blood after slaughters on farms and black was linseed oil pigmented
      with soot, lamp-black, etc.

      Scott J.
      Royal Marines
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Robert Van Patten <orville@...>
      To: War of 1812 mail list <WarOf1812@onelist.com>
      Date: Monday, November 01, 1999 1:22 PM
      Subject: [WarOf1812] Canvas painting


      >From: "Robert Van Patten" <orville@...>
      >
      >I need information on the kind of paint that can be used for painting
      >things like gaiters and knapsacks - primarily black - but interested in all
      >common colors. Comments?
      >
      >>The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
      square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
      square miles...
      >
    • NINETY3RD@xxx.xxx
      ... Durn! You beat me to it Scott! ... B 93rd SHRoFLHU
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 1, 1999
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        In a message dated 01/11/1999 12:34:28 PM, scottj@... writes:
        >I once was told that linseed oil was the base for most weather-durable
        >paint
        >in the 18th and early 19th Century. Tint and color was provided from
        >abundant local sources. Hence, barnyard red was linseed oil pigmented
        >with
        >animal blood after slaughters on farms and black was linseed oil pigmented
        >with soot, lamp-black, etc.
        >Scott J.

        Durn! You beat me to it Scott!
        :-)

        B
        93rd SHRoFLHU
      • Gary Stephens
        Hello, all, Thanks, Larry, for the information regarding fish oil. I had no idea regarding that one. Learning curve takes an upward swing. :-) I wonder,
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 3, 1999
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          Hello, all,

          Thanks, Larry, for the information regarding fish oil. I had no
          idea regarding that one. Learning curve takes an upward swing. :-) I
          wonder, however, about the blood bit, as blood, when dry, tends to be
          brownish, not scarlet. Perhaps the oil was mixed with true vermillion
          (can't remember for the life of me where that comes from - must go dig out
          my ancient notes)?

          Mighten milk paint serve well on canvas? When the milk paint dries
          it is one of the hardest known paints in existence, extremely durable. Easy
          to obtain and mix these days as Lee Valley carries all the period colours
          in powder form.

          Lorina

          --------------------------------------
          Five Rivers Chapmanry ~ purveyors of quality hand-crafted cooperage & fine
          hand-sewn, embroidered garments http://www.5rivers.org e-mail:
          info@...
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