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Re: canvas painting

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  • Gary Stephens
    Sorry to leap in here so late on this topic, but I ve been kinda busy. Having made my living on and off as a multi-media artist, I d advise you to make sure
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 1999
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      Sorry to leap in here so late on this topic, but I've been kinda busy.

      Having made my living on and off as a multi-media artist, I'd
      advise you to make sure you purchase a high quality acrylic paint. Some of
      the 'fabric' paints available in fabric stores simply won't hold up to the
      type of abuse gear for historical re-enactment will undergo.

      I would, however, highly recommend Liquitex acrylic paints,
      available at any fine art store. For some years I painted 'art' t-shirts.
      My philosphy about 'art' garments of this nature was they had to stand the
      abuse I would give them, and so I painted two fantasy dragon t-shirts for
      my children who were then adolescent and extremely abusive of their
      clothing. These t-shirts were washed weekly, in hot water, detergents,
      bleach, often dried in the dryer or exposed to sunlight. The colours over
      the years remained brilliant and the detail sharp. My son, now 22, still
      has the t-shirt. It's mildly faded now after eight years, and the cotton a
      bit holey (no, not holy), but the dragon is quite plain.

      The key, when using acrylic, is to be sure you use apply the paint
      with a damp but not wet brush, being sure of even and dense coverage, which
      strokes which push the pigment into the fibres. You will have to remember
      the chemistry of the colours, i.e. alizarin crimson is transparent and
      staining, cadmium red is opaque tending to be fugitive, etc. Once the
      fabric has dried 24 hours, set the paint by ironing on the wrong side with
      a hot iron, no steam. This will draw the acrylic into the fibres. You won't
      have to seal. The paint will last years.

      Oh, one more caveat - you might want to wash whatever it is you're
      going to paint first, as sometimes sizings which are put in fabrics can
      inhibit the fibres' ability to absorb pigment. The other thing to remember
      is if you have a large, flat surface to paint, you might want to prepare
      the canvas, so to speak, by applying a light coat of Gesso and then do a
      light sanding. This is what should be done to floorcloths before they are
      painted.

      Hope this helps.

      Lorina

      --------------------------------------
      Five Rivers Chapmanry ~ purveyors of quality hand-crafted cooperage & fine
      hand-sewn, embroidered garments http://www.5rivers.org e-mail:
      info@...
    • Robert Van Patten
      Dear Lorina: thanks for all the caveats and the advice. van ... of ... the ... which ... with ... won t ... remember ... fine ... square miles: in North
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 1999
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        Dear Lorina: thanks for all the caveats and the advice.

        van

        ----------
        > Having made my living on and off as a multi-media artist, I'd
        > advise you to make sure you purchase a high quality acrylic paint. Some
        of
        > the 'fabric' paints available in fabric stores simply won't hold up to
        the
        > type of abuse gear for historical re-enactment will undergo.
        >
        > I would, however, highly recommend Liquitex acrylic paints,
        > available at any fine art store.
        > The colours over> the years remained brilliant and the detail sharp.
        >
        > The key, when using acrylic, is to be sure you use apply the paint
        > with a damp but not wet brush, being sure of even and dense coverage,
        which
        > strokes which push the pigment into the fibres. You will have to remember
        > the chemistry of the colours, i.e. alizarin crimson is transparent and
        > staining, cadmium red is opaque tending to be fugitive, etc. Once the
        > fabric has dried 24 hours, set the paint by ironing on the wrong side
        with
        > a hot iron, no steam. This will draw the acrylic into the fibres. You
        won't
        > have to seal. The paint will last years.
        >
        > Oh, one more caveat - you might want to wash whatever it is you're
        > going to paint first, as sometimes sizings which are put in fabrics can
        > inhibit the fibres' ability to absorb pigment. The other thing to
        remember
        > is if you have a large, flat surface to paint, you might want to prepare
        > the canvas, so to speak, by applying a light coat of Gesso and then do a
        > light sanding. This is what should be done to floorcloths before they are
        > painted.
        >
        > Hope this helps.
        >
        > Lorina
        >
        > --------------------------------------
        > Five Rivers Chapmanry ~ purveyors of quality hand-crafted cooperage &
        fine
        > hand-sewn, embroidered garments http://www.5rivers.org e-mail:
        > info@...
        >
        > > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
        square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS
        of square miles...
      • Bateman, Andrew
        Does anyone know what they used in 1812 to paint canvas backpacks, etc? I have no doubt that modern latex products and the like will look sharp and last well,
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 1999
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          Does anyone know what they used in 1812 to paint canvas backpacks, etc? I
          have no doubt that modern latex products and the like will look sharp and
          last well, but it might be better to use something more authentic.

          Pte. Andrew Bateman, 1/41st Regt. of Foot
        • Larry Lozon
          From: Bateman, Andrew Does anyone know what they used in 1812 to paint canvas backpacks According to Ron Berlin who has been a
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 1, 1999
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            From: "Bateman, Andrew"
            <abateman@...>

            Does anyone know what they used
            in 1812 to paint canvas backpacks

            According to Ron Berlin who has been a
            professional painter for approximately
            fifty years and remembers his father
            making paint from scratch. The old
            paints were made with 'fish oil' as
            their base. In Canada and the United
            States the paint you buy to guard
            against rust is made with 'fish oil',
            as it penetrates the best. Rustoleum or
            Tremclad is the same as 1812 paint. I
            have been using it for years and it soaks
            into the canvas and makes it waterproof.
            If you want to touch it up after a few
            years of wear just apply a coat of 'floor wax'.
            All authentic 1812 products.

            Larry Lozon
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