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Re: Sharpe

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  • Roger Fuller
    ... Thanks for your views, Larry. I will now add my own. I wish I could say that Mr Moore and the Sharpe s Series adhere closely to reality, but IMHO they do
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 2, 1998
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      >From: "Larry Lozon" <lalozon@...>
      >
      >Ladies and Gentlemen:
      >
      > I'm sitting hear watching this War of 1812 list grow
      >by leaps and bounds, and damn this is great.
      >
      > In the article about the 95th. I would like to say
      >only that Mr. Moore of the Sharpe's Series may be good
      >or maybe bad for re-enacting, but if it was his idea
      >during the shooting of the series to have the Musketmen
      >spit the balls down the barrel count me out. I have never
      >read anything that says "put your mouth over a loaded musket" !
      >
      Thanks for your views, Larry. I will now add my own.

      I wish I could say that Mr Moore and the Sharpe's Series adhere closely to
      reality, but IMHO they do not. Whether they are spitting musket balls down
      rifle barrels (which as the owner of a Baker, I can tell you, is NOT
      advisable!!) or pretending the Chosen Men are a sort of Frank Sinatra/Sammy
      Davis Jr "Ratpack" of the Napoleonic Era, the whole series, with a few
      exceptions, I feel is an over-the-top farbfest.

      The REAL Rifle Corps would never have tolerated a loose cannon like Sharpe-
      they operated on teamwork, but using individual initiative to aid in the
      team effort, not for reckless self-aggrandizement a la Sharpie. He would
      have been sent to a posting in the tropics double-quick.....

      The "Chosen Men" were not a sort of Dirty Dozen or Praetorian Guard, but
      rather a type of lance corporal, to make the sergeant's duties a bit
      lighter.

      Despite Cornwell's and the TV series portraying most officers as
      empty-headed fops, many officers, esp. in the Rifle Corps, were quite brave
      and did well as leaders. Men were sometimes promoted from the ranks to
      officer status, e.g, Surtees, and he did quite well, and was accepted by his
      fellow officers as one of their own. The Rifle Corps was supposed to be an
      antidote, or at least a palliative, to the trad. Prussian style of
      discipline and stratified hierarchy as had been practiced in the redcoated
      ranks of the Brit. Army since at least the time of Frederick the Great.

      Harper could never have made sergeant, let alone RSM! He can't read! His
      seven-barrelled gun is a crock as well...how many times have those of us
      with flintlocks, shooting them in line volleys, have ever mistakenly thought
      our weapon fired, when it really didn't, and then double-loaded them, with
      the resulting BOOM and sheet of flame hitting our neighbor? Try doing it
      with live ball, and with SEVEN barrels...eventually you will receive free,
      unscheduled instant rearrangement of your hands and face.....

      I saw no evidence in the books or TV series of de Rottenburg's 1799
      LI/Rifleman tactics of file partners and extended order being specifically
      employed. Rather, the personalities are basically set up as using ad hoc
      ranger tactics, i.e., fighting as a mob, throwing themselves at the enemy,
      with blood-curdling Gaelic screams, &c, &c. Riflemen may have been "saucy
      fellows", but they were more intelligent and usually under control- that's
      why they did so well.

      (FWIW, isn't it interesting how the "South Essex" look like the Canadian
      Fencibles? It's just my observation, that's all.)

      I could speak about Mr Moore but won't. He has managed to make a good living
      out of it all, though. (Is it true there's a Sharpe's Fan Club?? Whatever
      turns 'em on...) I will leave comments on him to our colleagues in the UK
      who know him better than I.

      I could go on and on, but I'm not interested in reenacting the TV series or
      the books (although one gent from New Brunswick did ask me that once in all
      innocence [I hope...]) What was good about the series? Obadiah Hakeswill!
      And that's all...

      If I've offended anybody, I'm sorry about that, but we all have to stop
      believing in Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy sometime. The books and series
      should be treated as escapist fare, a good read on a rainy afternoon, and
      nothing more, I feel.

      I have the honour, &c, &c,
      Roger Fuller
      Rifleman -not Officer....
      3/95th Foot
    • Steve Hartwick
      Ladies and Gentlemen and Benton too ;) ;) I put to you that Sharpes Rifles are wonderfully amuzing books and tv shows intended to entertain the public at
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 7, 1998
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        Ladies and Gentlemen and Benton too ;) ;)

        I put to you that Sharpes Rifles are wonderfully amuzing books and tv shows intended to entertain the public at large. If it brings some intrest to the period so be it.

        It is for entertainment not to teach. We in this hobby on the other hand work the other way. We teach and entertain.

        Sharpe only becomes a problem if we let it. Please don't take these shows too seriously and be gentle when speaking to the public about it. You may find a new recruit asking if the stuff on Sharpe last night ws real.

        Paul: The idea of taking US troops as Dutch/Belgians to Waterloo this time is mine. It was last time in 95 too but we got no takers. As Roger has suggested it is so that more people can go who might otherwise might not due to the expence of a new uniform and the cost of the trip. This time I have had inquires from approx. 30 people. I realise that this will be a bone of contention with some people and I hope I have not offended you with the concept. For the Record the Dutch 32nd regiment wore a blue coatee with red facing and white lace. It may just be me but that tunic sounds familiar.

        Steve
      • Roger Fuller
        ... From: Steve Hartwick To: 1812 onelist Date: Saturday, November 07, 1998 2:07 AM Subject: [WarOf1812]
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 7, 1998
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          -----Original Message-----
          From: Steve Hartwick <shartwic@...>
          To: 1812 onelist <warof1812@onelist.com>
          Date: Saturday, November 07, 1998 2:07 AM
          Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe


          >Ladies and Gentlemen and Benton too ;) ;)

          >I put to you that Sharpes Rifles are wonderfully amuzing books and tv shows intended to entertain the public at large. If it brings some intrest to the period so be it.

          >It is for entertainment not to teach. We in this hobby on the other hand work the other way. We teach and entertain.

          >Sharpe only becomes a problem if we let it. Please don't take these shows too seriously and be gentle when speaking to the public about it. You may find a new recruit asking if the stuff on Sharpe last night ws real.


          >Steve


          Thanks, Steve,

          this pretty much sums up what I've been saying in the past few days.

          We in the 3/95th discussed it a while back and our policy is: Sharpe is neither a good thing, nor a bad thing, but sometimes it is a necessary thing, in order to draw the public. We would _never_ denigrate the books or series to a member of the public. Who wants to send away somebody angry, when they came to us with a smile? People want something good to entertain them, pique their interest, and perhaps thereby they might learn something new to them while they watch and speak with us. (Who knows? We might even get some more to join us- at least they are a bit more interested in history than the general public.)

          Suffice it to say, as the guys in rifle green toting Bakers, we've pretty much accepted it as a fact of life that for the foreseeable future, we'll be the ones at events who will hear the most about it, and are used to it.

          We have had people join because of a strong interest in Sharpe, but have had to turn away a few because they thought they WERE Sharpe *grin***... but that's another story for another day.

          Roger Fuller
          3/95th
        • NINETY3RD@aol.com
          ... mine. ... so ... new ... 30 ... I ... regiment ... tunic ... Say--this might sound familiar too -- At battle of Waterloo, Brit Highlander red coatee with
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 8, 1998
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            In a message dated 06/11/1998 11:07:12 PM, you wrote:

            > The idea of taking US troops as Dutch/Belgians to Waterloo this time is
            mine.
            >It was last time in 95 too but we got no takers. As Roger has suggested it is
            so
            >that more people can go who might otherwise might not due to the expence of a
            new
            >uniform and the cost of the trip. This time I have had inquires from approx.
            30
            >people. I realise that this will be a bone of contention with some people and
            I
            >hope I have not offended you with the concept. For the Record the Dutch 32nd
            regiment
            >wore a blue coatee with red facing and white lace. It may just be me but that
            tunic
            >sounds familiar.

            Say--this might sound familiar too -- At battle of Waterloo, Brit Highlander
            red coatee with yellow facings. Ok, name the unit!
            da da da dum, da da dum. da da da dum dee, dadadadada...
            OK! Let's see what our panel said:
            #1 - The 92nd Gordons! Yes! - the 92nd was indeed at Waterloo, however the
            coatee in question being worn at the 1990 and 1995 (and in 2000) is that of
            the 93rd! Who weren't really there!
            Yep - that is what I have worn, and SHALL wear at Waterloo (which event
            happens only every 5 years...). My uniform of an officer of the 93rd
            Highlanders. Anyone who wishes to call me FARB first send me oh, $3000 to pay
            for a 92nd officer's kit. I shall be happy to accomodate.
            I think that gets across the idea.....
            eh?
            ;-)
            Cheers!
            Benton
          • IX Regt.
            ... We ll be there and proud of it, IX Regt. arrived at Antwerpen in July 1815 and matched straight to Paris. We d been held up by a minor show the 1812-14:-)
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 10, 1998
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              >Benton
              >

              We'll be there and proud of it, IX Regt. arrived at Antwerpen in July
              1815 and matched straight to Paris. We'd been held up by a minor show
              the 1812-14:-) and so missed our place in glory, but still we;ll be
              there and I said very proud to be fighting our friends and colleagues in
              21eme.

              Lets get'em!

              Peter
              --
              IX Regt.
            • Larry Simpson
              I personaly like the Sharpe series. Try to find a book, movie, story, etc. today thatgets ALL the facts straight. It is even harder to do when the subject is
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 22, 1999
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                I personaly like the Sharpe series. Try to find a book, movie, story,
                etc. today thatgets ALL the facts straight. It is even harder to do
                when the subject is a historical one.

                Even if there are problems with accuracy - IT IS STILL A DAMN FINE
                READ!!!!

                Larry
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              • Robert Van Patten
                Amen to that! ... square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 22, 1999
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                  Amen to that!

                  ----------
                  > From: Larry Simpson <correus@...>
                  > To: WarOf1812@onelist.com
                  > Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe
                  > Date: Tuesday, June 22, 1999 9:35 AM
                  >
                  > From: Larry Simpson <correus@...>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I personaly like the Sharpe series. Try to find a book, movie, story,
                  > etc. today thatgets ALL the facts straight. It is even harder to do
                  > when the subject is a historical one.
                  >
                  > Even if there are problems with accuracy - IT IS STILL A DAMN FINE
                  > READ!!!!
                  >
                  > Larry
                  > _________________________________________________________
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                  > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                  square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS
                  of square miles...
                • BritcomHMP@xxx.xxx
                  In a message dated 6/22/99 8:34:33 AM Central Daylight Time, correus@yahoo.com writes:
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jun 22, 1999
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                    In a message dated 6/22/99 8:34:33 AM Central Daylight Time,
                    correus@... writes:

                    << Even if there are problems with accuracy - IT IS STILL A DAMN FINE
                    READ!!!! >>

                    Oh true the books do rattle along and are great fun. However most of the big
                    battle scenes in them owe a LOT to the accounts in Napiers' History of the
                    Peninsula War. Personally I always find it far more thrilling to read such
                    accounts by people who were actually there and truly 'tell it like it was'.

                    Interestingly when the TV Sharpe was first proposed we were going to correct
                    the books inaccuracies (as far as possible) but when that version got canned
                    (for lack of money) and the Producer (Kenny McBain of 'Inspector Morse' fame)
                    died all such idea ended. It was revived with a much smaller budget and the
                    rest, as they say, is history.

                    Cheers

                    Tim
                  • NINETY3RD@xxx.xxx
                    In a message dated 22/6/1999 6:34:34 AM, correus@yahoo.com writes:
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jun 22, 1999
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                      In a message dated 22/6/1999 6:34:34 AM, correus@... writes:

                      << I personaly like the Sharpe series. Try to find a book, movie, story,
                      etc. today thatgets ALL the facts straight. It is even harder to do
                      when the subject is a historical one.

                      Even if there are problems with accuracy - IT IS STILL A DAMN FINE
                      READ!!!! >>

                      I don't think any of us were reviewing the books' literary appeal, but simply
                      pointing out (in our exaggerated way) the Sharpe books -- and movies -- are
                      not historical works, but are indeed novels -- and movies --, and should not
                      be used as a basis for historical research. That may seem obvious to most on
                      this list, but believe me, there are plenty in the world who do not
                      understand this simple fact!
                      For example: It is rather like either version of "The Buccaneer" movies.
                      Swashbuckling good cinema fun (I even have both versions on tape), but
                      absolute rubbish as history -- unfortunately many many people do take them as
                      history lessons.
                      Cheers!
                      B
                      http://hometown.aol.com/ninety3rd
                    • The Bosse Family
                      Great! Lets see if we can roll in Czar of Holy Russia and he can do what Nappy couldn t!! Dave Bosse
                      Message 10 of 19 , Apr 5, 2000
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                        Great!
                        Lets see if we can roll in Czar of Holy Russia and he can do what Nappy
                        couldn't!!

                        Dave Bosse
                      • thecheetah
                        What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?
                        Message 11 of 19 , Oct 1, 2001
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                          What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?
                        • PEGGY MATHEWS
                          Well, where to begin? They are entertaining historical *fiction*, woven around the Napoleonic Wars and slightly beyond. They follow the traditional,
                          Message 12 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
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                            Well, where to begin? They are entertaining historical *fiction*, woven around the Napoleonic Wars and slightly beyond. They follow the traditional, stereotypical image of the crude gutter-lout British soldier, most of whom have a heart of gold inside. The officer corps are largely either incompetent ego-maniacs or noble lads usually destined for an early exit. The French are typically brave and dedicated (where's the glory in beating a weak foe?) with one sympathetic officer who inevitably dies and one despicable Frenchman who often lingers through several books. The Spanish are usually portrayed in the worst possible light, once again in keeping with the popular stereotype.

                            There are factual errors both in terms of the armies and the tactics, though as a recurring theme it seems to be in order to perpetuate the popular myths.

                            Sharpe is not totally a superman, as he sometimes misses, sometimes has a misfire, and is frequently wounded. Though as a hero he will survive near certain death at least once a book, usually in a plausible manner. He is sometimes outsmarted in the short term, but his street smarts will always prevail in the end.

                            As is often the case with a successful series, the author has taken Sharpie (I love the character of Sgt. Hakeswill, especially as played in the TV series) to too many places, and been at the heart of too many events. I followed him through the Peninsula to South America, and then back to India. but when he showed up at Trafalgar I dropped out. Perhaps when I've read everything else pending in my library....

                            The TV series did more good than harm IMO. While perpetuating some myths it also created a renewed interest in the Peninsula War and as a sideline, reenacting. It then behooves us to take the interested neophyte and lead them to the correct path(s).

                            Hope this helps.

                            Michael

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: thecheetah
                            Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2001 7:04 AM
                            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe

                            What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?



                            The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

                            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • John-Paul Johnson
                            ... Too right. I came across the TV series when it was first shown on the Buffalo PBS station. I was INSTANTLY hooked! Even with the very limited knowledge
                            Message 13 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
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                              > The TV series did more good than harm IMO. While perpetuating some myths it also created a renewed interest in the Peninsula War and as a sideline, reenacting. It then behooves us to take the interested neophyte and lead them to the correct path(s).
                              >

                              Too right. I came across the TV series when it was first shown on the
                              Buffalo PBS station. I was INSTANTLY hooked! Even with the very
                              limited knowledge of the Peninsular War, I was quite well aware that
                              bringing fictional characters into an historical event often makes for
                              some interesting historical..hmmmm...revisions?

                              Anyway, it was not long after History Television started showing the
                              series again that I met up with The Newf's at a dog 'n' pony show at
                              Fort Willow near Barrie, Ontario. The rest, as they say, is history....

                              I've read most of the Sharpe series now but Cornwell lost me with
                              Sharpe's Triumph. IMHO the story is poorly constructed and the
                              improbabilities and coincidences were spread so thick that I found
                              myself crying out "Oh COME ON!!!" many times throughout the book. I
                              don't think I be picking up Trafalgar at all.

                              Also, ever notice that the later stories all seem to have the theme of
                              Sharpe being accused of a crime he didn't commit and being forced to
                              clear his name? Holy Formulaic writing Batman!

                              J-P Johnson
                              Bulger's Company
                              Royal Nfld Reg't

                              --------------
                              J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/
                            • Bateman, Andrew
                              ... I ve read so many of these books they all blend together! Yes, they re getting worse, but they appeal to a side of my mind that wants to suspend disbelief
                              Message 14 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
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                                > -----Original Message-----
                                > From: John-Paul Johnson [mailto:jpjohnsn@...]
                                >
                                > I've read most of the Sharpe series now but Cornwell lost me with
                                > Sharpe's Triumph. IMHO the story is poorly constructed and the
                                > improbabilities and coincidences were spread so thick that I found
                                > myself crying out "Oh COME ON!!!" many times throughout the book. I
                                > don't think I be picking up Trafalgar at all.

                                I've read so many of these books they all blend together! Yes, they're
                                getting worse, but they appeal to a side of my mind that wants to suspend
                                disbelief and be entertained.

                                The main problem is the inconsistencies that crop up as Cornwell tries to
                                pack more and more action into the parts of Sharpe's life before "Sharpe's
                                Rifles". A French ambush in that book (in 1809) was supposed to be Sharpe's
                                first uncertain time leading men under fire. Yet in "Sharpe's Fortress"
                                (1804?) he leads 80 men over the wall at Gawlighur to capture the gate from
                                behind and appears very confident doing it. One other thing I've noticed
                                about all the India books: they all end with Sharpe throwing Hakeswill to
                                dangerous animals!

                                Hope Cornwell decides to continue the Starbuck chronicles instead. Left the
                                poor guy stranded at the end of Antietam!

                                Andrew Bateman, 1/41st
                              • petemonahan@aol.com
                                euan What do we think of Sharpe? Great military soap opera -I ve read and own them all- but not exactly 100% H.A.! Also, as The Sharpe Site points out, the
                                Message 15 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
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                                  euan
                                  What do we think of Sharpe? Great military soap opera -I've read and own
                                  them all- but not exactly 100% H.A.! Also, as "The Sharpe Site" points out,
                                  the man has more than even the proverbial 9 lives. ( One of their pages lists
                                  all his wounds - his surface scars alone must look like a road map of the
                                  Peninsula!) And the plots get a wee bit predictable, especially the
                                  improbable, doomed from the start lust interest.

                                  Having said all that, will I read the next one? You betcha!

                                  Peter Monahan,
                                  Royal Nfld. Reg't
                                • Larry Lozon
                                  From: thecheetah What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books? ....................................... Euan: take
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
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                                    From: "thecheetah" <euan.wilkinson@...>

                                    What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?
                                    .......................................

                                    Euan:

                                    take a tour through

                                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WarOf1812/messages

                                    this subject raises it's head every six to eight months!
                                    ~ there are mega postings on this subject

                                    enjoy :-)
                                  • colsjtjones2000@yahoo.ca
                                    Michael - I thought you were right on in your response. I have enjoyed the Sharpe novels, but I take them with a grain of salt - and I often cringe when
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
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                                      Michael - I thought you were right on in your response. I have
                                      enjoyed the Sharpe novels, but I take them with a grain of salt -
                                      and I often cringe when Cornwell takes too much license with
                                      historical fact. I have enjoyed the TV series, although it takes
                                      even more license, and more cringing.

                                      Other people have cringed at Trafalgar. But Sharpe's description of
                                      the battle *itself* as really a non participant is not bad. Look at
                                      Cornwell's references for it - he certainly consulted the
                                      appropriate people.

                                      Doug


                                      --- In WarOf1812@y..., "PEGGY MATHEWS" <ciefranche21e@m...> wrote:
                                      > Well, where to begin? They are entertaining historical *fiction*,
                                      woven around the Napoleonic Wars and slightly beyond. They follow
                                      the traditional, stereotypical image of the crude gutter-lout British
                                      soldier, most of whom have a heart of gold inside. The officer corps
                                      are largely either incompetent ego-maniacs or noble lads usually
                                      destined for an early exit. The French are typically brave and
                                      dedicated (where's the glory in beating a weak foe?) with one
                                      sympathetic officer who inevitably dies and one despicable Frenchman
                                      who often lingers through several books. The Spanish are usually
                                      portrayed in the worst possible light, once again in keeping with the
                                      popular stereotype.
                                      >
                                      > There are factual errors both in terms of the armies and the
                                      tactics, though as a recurring theme it seems to be in order to
                                      perpetuate the popular myths.
                                      >
                                      > Sharpe is not totally a superman, as he sometimes misses, sometimes
                                      has a misfire, and is frequently wounded. Though as a hero he will
                                      survive near certain death at least once a book, usually in a
                                      plausible manner. He is sometimes outsmarted in the short term, but
                                      his street smarts will always prevail in the end.
                                      >
                                      > As is often the case with a successful series, the author has taken
                                      Sharpie (I love the character of Sgt. Hakeswill, especially as played
                                      in the TV series) to too many places, and been at the heart of too
                                      many events. I followed him through the Peninsula to South America,
                                      and then back to India. but when he showed up at Trafalgar I dropped
                                      out. Perhaps when I've read everything else pending in my library....
                                      >
                                      > The TV series did more good than harm IMO. While perpetuating some
                                      myths it also created a renewed interest in the Peninsula War and as
                                      a sideline, reenacting. It then behooves us to take the interested
                                      neophyte and lead them to the correct path(s).
                                      >
                                      > Hope this helps.
                                      >
                                      > Michael
                                      >
                                      > ----- Original Message -----
                                      > From: thecheetah
                                      > Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2001 7:04 AM
                                      > To: WarOf1812@y...
                                      > Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe
                                      >
                                      > What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
                                      hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
                                      fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
                                      >
                                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                                      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Larry Lozon
                                      From: Raymond Hobbs ... ..................... We didn t have our eyes on you Sharpie! Cuz last night it was HORNBLOWER The Duel on
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Mar 1, 2002
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                                        From: "Raymond Hobbs" <ray.hobbs@...>


                                        > Interesting that the 24th (and indeed the 23rd - Royal Welch Fusliers)
                                        > were present at so many battles in the Peninsula - yet they are
                                        > completely ignored by Bernard Cornwell in his Sharpe books.
                                        .....................

                                        We didn't have our eyes on you Sharpie!

                                        Cuz last night it was HORNBLOWER "The Duel"
                                        on the telly
                                      • Peter Catley
                                        Cornwall ignores almost all the Regiments in the Peninsula. He only really mentions the rifle regiments and the fictious South Essex . The 1/23rd (Royal Welsh
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Mar 1, 2002
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                                          Cornwall ignores almost all the Regiments in the Peninsula. He only really
                                          mentions the rifle regiments and the fictious "South Essex".

                                          The 1/23rd (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) and 2/24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiments
                                          have a fine history in the Peninsula war. I don't know off hand where the
                                          1/24th served at this period.

                                          Peter Catley

                                          -----Original Message-----
                                          From: Larry Lozon [mailto:lalozon@...]
                                          Sent: 01 March 2002 21:24
                                          To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe

                                          From: "Raymond Hobbs" <ray.hobbs@...>


                                          > Interesting that the 24th (and indeed the 23rd - Royal Welch Fusliers)
                                          > were present at so many battles in the Peninsula - yet they are
                                          > completely ignored by Bernard Cornwell in his Sharpe books.
                                          .....................

                                          We didn't have our eyes on you Sharpie!

                                          Cuz last night it was HORNBLOWER "The Duel"
                                          on the telly




















                                          The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                                          square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
                                          square miles...

                                          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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