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Re: A question for the Navy types out there.

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  • Dale Kidd
    So there were actually TWO Growlers!!! No bloody wonder the information regarding the ship is so friggin confused... various authors have been confused beween
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 25 5:52 PM
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      So there were actually TWO Growlers!!! No bloody wonder the
      information regarding the ship is so friggin' confused... various
      authors have been confused beween the two, which both sailed at the
      same time and in different theatres of the same conflict.

      Nice work, Rich. That clears up an issue that's been bugging me for a
      while. Thanx.

      ~Dale

      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Rich Parkinson"
      <rich.parkinson@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ray,
      >
      > I'm obviously not a navy type ;) but I came across this at
      http://www.hazegray.org/danfs/
      >
      >
      > Growler, a wooden sloop, was purchased as Experiment on Lake
      Ontario during 1812, and was first commanded by Sailing Master M. P.
      Mix. She was actively employed with Chauncey's squadron on Lake
      Ontario from 1812 to 1814. Growler took part in attacks on Kingston,
      York, and Fort George and the engagement with the British squadron 7
      to 11 August 1813. She was captured by the British 10 August 1813.
      Recaptured 5 October 1813, Growler was libelled and purchased by the
      Navy, rejoining the squadron. The British captured her again 5 May
      1814 at Oswego, N.Y., and she was taken into the Royal Navy as
      Hamilton.
      >
      > The second Growler was a sloop purchased on Lake Champlain in 1812.
      She cruised under the command of Lt. Sidney Smith as part of
      Commodore Macdonough's squadron until she was taken by the British
      near Isle Aux Noix, Canada, 3 June 1813. Growler was then taken into
      the Royal Navy as Shannon, and later Chub. Under the latter name she
      was captured by the American Squadron in the Battle of Lake Champlain
      11 September 1814. She saw no further service however, and was sold
      at Whitehall, N.Y. in July 1815.
      >
      > R. Parkinson
      > 41st
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Ray Hobbs
      > To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, August 24, 2006 12:05 PM
      > Subject: [WarOf1812] A question for the Navy types out there.
      >
      >
      > I have looked at all the references I can lay my hands on and
      have a
      > puzzle to solve about the naming of US ships during the War of
      1812.
      >
      > I have come across two US ships named the "Growler" during the
      War of
      > 1812. One was an 11-gun sloop (112 tons) that was captured by the
      > British at Ile aux Noix in early June, 1813. It was renamed HMS
      Chubb
      > and took part in Murray's raid on Plattsburgh in July 1813.
      >
      > There is another of the same name (Growler) which took part in
      several
      > engagements on Lake Ontario in 1813 - running aground, and being
      > captured in August 1813. This latter ship was smaller (85 tons),
      and
      > carried two guns (a 32lb carronade and a 12 pdr).
      >
      > What confuses me is that the second Growler was also involved
      earlier
      > in the year, in April 1813 in the attack on York. This suggests
      to me
      > that there must have been two ships of the same name sailing at
      the
      > same time under the US flag.
      >
      > Can anyone sort this one out, or throw any light on it for me?
      >
      > Many thanks
      > Ray Hobbs
      > 41st Regt.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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