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Lafitte and the boys

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  • John Ogden
    All- Piracy is such an ugly, judgmental word. I prefer to refer to these activities as pre-emptive salvage operations . Your servant, John Ogden -- Fortuna
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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      All-
      Piracy is such an ugly, judgmental word. I prefer to refer to these
      activities as "pre-emptive salvage operations".

      Your servant,
      John Ogden

      --
      Fortuna audentes favorit.
      ("Fortune favors the bold.")


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • annbwass@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/7/2006 6:47:06 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, johnjogden@gmail.com writes: All- Piracy is such an ugly, judgmental word. I prefer to refer to
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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        In a message dated 7/7/2006 6:47:06 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        johnjogden@... writes:



        All-
        Piracy is such an ugly, judgmental word. I prefer to refer to these
        activities as "pre-emptive salvage operations".






        Besides, I thought Lafitte was operating under Letters of Marque, albeit
        rather dubious ones.

        Ann Wass


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John Ogden
        Well, the distinction between piracy and privateering is largely one of legal technicality. The authority issuing the letter of marque may not be recognized
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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          Well, the distinction between piracy and privateering is largely one of
          legal technicality. The authority issuing the letter of marque may not be
          recognized by the international community at large. Lafitte's letters of
          marque came from Cartagena (modern Colombia), which was then in the process
          of securing its independence from Spain. That independence (read "national
          sovreignty") had not yet been recognized by Spain, Britain nor the United
          States. Therefore, there is a case for Lafitte and co'y to be labelled as
          pirates.

          On 7/7/06, annbwass@... <annbwass@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > In a message dated 7/7/2006 6:47:06 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          >
          > johnjogden@... <johnjogden%40gmail.com> writes:
          >
          > All-
          > Piracy is such an ugly, judgmental word. I prefer to refer to these
          > activities as "pre-emptive salvage operations".
          >
          > Besides, I thought Lafitte was operating under Letters of Marque, albeit
          > rather dubious ones.
          >
          > Ann Wass
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Fortuna audentes favorit.
          ("Fortune favors the bold.")


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • J.Bruce Whittaker
          Q: What is Fifteen men on a dead man s chest ? A: A pirates idea of a fair fight. Some mid-afternoon silliness on a summer day. Best regards, Bruce Whittaker
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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            Q: What is "Fifteen men on a dead man's chest"?

            A: A pirates idea of a fair fight.

            Some mid-afternoon silliness on a summer day.
            Best regards,
            Bruce Whittaker
          • annbwass@aol.com
            In a message dated 7/7/2006 1:45:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, johnjogden@gmail.com writes: Lafitte s letters of marque came from Cartagena (modern Colombia),
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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              In a message dated 7/7/2006 1:45:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
              johnjogden@... writes:

              Lafitte's letters of
              marque came from Cartagena (modern Colombia), which was then in the process
              of securing its independence from Spain. That independence (read "national
              sovreignty") had not yet been recognized by Spain, Britain nor the United
              States.


              Thanks. I couldn't remember the particulars. That is why I said his letters
              were "dubious."

              Ann Wass


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • tedyeat
              According to the latest, and best book, THE PIRATES LAFFITE by William C. Davis, there is no indication, after searching the records, that the Laffites ever
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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                According to the latest, and best book, THE PIRATES LAFFITE by
                William C. Davis, there is no indication, after searching the
                records, that the Laffites ever held a Cartegena Letter of Marque!

                YH&OS
                Ted Yeatman


                --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, annbwass@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > In a message dated 7/7/2006 1:45:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                > johnjogden@... writes:
                >
                > Lafitte's letters of
                > marque came from Cartagena (modern Colombia), which was then in
                the process
                > of securing its independence from Spain. That independence
                (read "national
                > sovreignty") had not yet been recognized by Spain, Britain nor
                the United
                > States.
                >
                >
                > Thanks. I couldn't remember the particulars. That is why I said
                his letters
                > were "dubious."
                >
                > Ann Wass
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • John Ogden
                All- Well, all that being established, pirate and piracy seem to be the legally correct technical terms. Even so, I stand by my pre-emptive salvage
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 7, 2006
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                  All-
                  Well, all that being established, "pirate" and "piracy" seem to be the
                  legally correct technical terms. Even so, I stand by my "pre-emptive
                  salvage" comment.


                  On 7/7/06, tedyeat <tedyeat@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > According to the latest, and best book, THE PIRATES LAFFITE by
                  > William C. Davis, there is no indication, after searching the
                  > records, that the Laffites ever held a Cartegena Letter of Marque!
                  >
                  > YH&OS
                  > Ted Yeatman
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com <WarOf1812%40yahoogroups.com>,
                  > annbwass@... wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > In a message dated 7/7/2006 1:45:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                  > > johnjogden@... writes:
                  > >
                  > > Lafitte's letters of
                  > > marque came from Cartagena (modern Colombia), which was then in
                  > the process
                  > > of securing its independence from Spain. That independence
                  > (read "national
                  > > sovreignty") had not yet been recognized by Spain, Britain nor
                  > the United
                  > > States.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Thanks. I couldn't remember the particulars. That is why I said
                  > his letters
                  > > were "dubious."
                  > >
                  > > Ann Wass
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  Fortuna audentes favorit.
                  ("Fortune favors the bold.")


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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