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Re: [WarOf1812] Musket firing training

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  • PEGGY Mathews
    Iwould think you would still want to draw wadded powder though. Wouldn t want it getting all gummy in the breech. IIRC the windage in a Bess was
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 14, 2006
      Iwould think you would still want to draw wadded powder though. Wouldn't
      want it getting all gummy in the breech. IIRC the windage in a Bess was
      proportionally greater than in the French and American armies, with the
      Americans having the tightest fit. So a new twist on the phrase "rolling
      volley" might be very practical. Unfortunately I'm not in a position to
      check my references right now, so going from memory. "Aim low lads.... No
      No! Not that low!" <vbg>

      I'm not sure I'd be too tickled to have rounds going off at any time. Even
      at a post I wouldn't take kindly to a shot disturbing my rest, and it might
      have a complacency factor should there be a real emergency. But perhaps
      they went to a specific area to discharge their firearm, or signalled,
      or....? Or maybe it was just unique to Fort So-And-So on the frontier. Me,
      I'd be annoyed as the sentry for creating a need to clean it!

      Michael M.



      ----------------------------------------------
      "Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able
      to tell the difference."





      >From: BritcomHMP@...
      >Reply-To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      >To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Musket firing training
      >Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2006 06:56:24 EDT
      >
      >
      >In a message dated 13/04/2006 21:22:23 Central Standard Time,
      >ciefranche21e@... writes:
      >
      >For the Americans I seem to recall someone posting that when they were on
      >sentry duty at a post they fired off their round when relieved rather than
      >pulling the ball to get some target practice. That may have been the
      >rules at
      >some post rather than doctrine though. Still, for an army that called
      >"Aim"
      >rather than "Present" I would infer some practice at shooting.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >Interestingly the British practice was to load 'running ball' that is the
      >charge was rammed home but the ball was put in after so that, after
      >completing
      >sentry duty, the ball could be rolled out without the need to fire the
      >musket
      >or draw the charge. This was particularly used on campaign when firing the
      >musket might alert the enemy.
      >
      >Cheers
      >
      >Tim
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
      >square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS
      >of square miles...
      >
      >Unit Contact information for North America:
      > ---------------------------------
      >Crown Forces Unit Listing:
      >http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
      >
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      >http://usforces1812.tripod.com
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
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