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'Pompeii of the East' discovered

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  • glifencible
    Interesting, as it took place in 1815. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4748902.stm All the people, their houses and culture are still encapsulated there
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 27, 2006
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      Interesting, as it took place in 1815.

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4748902.stm

      "All the people, their houses and culture are still encapsulated there
      as they were in 1815. It's important that we keep that capsule intact
      and open it very carefully."
    • Jim Krause
      ... Last Friday I saw a program on the History Channel called Little Ice Age-Big Chill.
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 28, 2006
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        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "glifencible" <blongo@...> wrote:
        >
        > Interesting, as it took place in 1815.
        >
        > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4748902.stm
        >
        > "All the people, their houses and culture are still encapsulated there
        > as they were in 1815. It's important that we keep that capsule intact
        > and open it very carefully."
        >

        Last Friday I saw a program on the History Channel called "Little Ice
        Age-Big Chill."
        http://www.historychannel.com/global/listings/listings.jsp?fromDate=24&fromMonth=1&fromYear=106&NetwCode=THC

        It briefly discussed this particular volcanic eruption. The eruption
        was so devastating, that it affected the weather world wide. New
        England had snow storms in June and July, 1816 which were attributed
        to the amount of ash in the stratosphere partially blocking a certain
        amount of sunlight. Crops failed, and there was a great migration to
        the western territories and new states of the U.S. Furthermore, the
        program suggested that there may have been some effect on the weather
        during the Battle of New Orleans indirectly aiding Jackson's victory.
        At any rate, the eruption of Mount Tambora made the eruption of Mount
        St. Helens look like a little belch. I found it fascinating.

        Jim Krause
        fifer
      • Camp Chief
        How could this be if the eruption did not take place until April 10th, 1815? David Randle Furthermore, the program suggested that there may have been some
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 28, 2006
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          How could this be if the eruption did not take place until April 10th, 1815?



          David Randle





          Furthermore, the program suggested that there may have been some effect on
          the weather during the Battle of New Orleans indirectly aiding Jackson's
          victory. At any rate, the eruption of Mount Tambora made the eruption of
          Mount St. Helens look like a little belch. I found it fascinating.

          Jim Krause
          fifer

          _____



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Craig Williams
          Mr. Randle is quite correct. The dates don t jibe. Incidentally, the Tambora eruption did cause weather disturbances that were felt in North America that year
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 28, 2006
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            Mr. Randle is quite correct. The dates don't jibe.

            Incidentally, the Tambora eruption did cause weather disturbances
            that were felt in North America that year though. The ash in the
            atmosphere caused a cooling and subsequent crop failure in North
            America. Because of this there was a famine here. The Native
            population referred to 1815 as "the year with no summer".

            Craig Williams

            On 28-Feb-06, at 2:28 PM, Camp Chief wrote:

            > How could this be if the eruption did not take place until April
            > 10th, 1815?
            >
            >
            >
            > David Randle
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Furthermore, the program suggested that there may have been some
            > effect on
            > the weather during the Battle of New Orleans indirectly aiding
            > Jackson's
            > victory. At any rate, the eruption of Mount Tambora made the
            > eruption of
            > Mount St. Helens look like a little belch. I found it fascinating.
            >
            > Jim Krause
            > fifer
            >
            > _____
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
            > hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
            > fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
            >
            > Unit Contact information for North America:
            > ---------------------------------
            > Crown Forces Unit Listing:
            > http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
            >
            > American Forces Unit Listing
            > http://usforces1812.tripod.com
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Jim Krause
            ... Sorry, bad typing and composition. I meant to imply that the continuing cold spell influenced the weather, and that the eruption of Mount Tambora
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 28, 2006
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              --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Craig Williams <sgtwarner@...> wrote:
              >
              > Mr. Randle is quite correct. The dates don't jibe.
              >
              > Incidentally, the Tambora eruption did cause weather disturbances
              > that were felt in North America that year though. The ash in the
              > atmosphere caused a cooling and subsequent crop failure in North
              > America. Because of this there was a famine here. The Native
              > population referred to 1815 as "the year with no summer".
              >
              > Craig Williams
              >
              > On 28-Feb-06, at 2:28 PM, Camp Chief wrote:
              >
              > > How could this be if the eruption did not take place until April
              > > 10th, 1815?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > David Randle


              Sorry, bad typing and composition. I meant to imply that the
              continuing cold spell influenced the weather, and that the eruption of
              Mount Tambora exaserbated a severe situation. Next time I'll compose
              my post a little better. Sorry for the confusion.

              Jim K
            • Richard Feltoe
              Dear Group, As it happens I had to do some research on this eruption as a sidebar part of a book I wrote a year or so ago. In reference to its impact upon
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 28, 2006
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                Dear Group,
                As it happens I had to do some research on this eruption as a sidebar part
                of a book I wrote a year or so ago. In reference to its impact upon Canada
                and Europe it certainly did cause a great deal of trouble. In Britain and
                across Europe, high dust levels in the upper atmosphere caused a general
                drop in temperature of around 10 degrees Farenheit, this was coupled with
                increased rain throughout the summer months (just think of the days before
                Waterloo). This was followed by widespread crop failures in the Autumn. It's
                also important to note that this climatic disaster also coincided with a
                major worldwide economic downturn as the nations of Europe (and particularly
                Britain) tried to reintegrate into society the hundreds of thousands of
                troops that were being demobbed, thus swamping the employment market with
                men and therefore depressing wages. While at the same time, the industrial
                complex that had thrived in supplying the war efforts of all the nations
                (but again, particularly the British) was suddenly deprived of its main
                markets and had to downsize and cut back while seeking to develop new
                opportunities. We're talking major economic meltdown and growing social
                upheaval here folks!

                As if these problems were not enough, during the winter of 1815/16 there was
                a huge upsurge in sunspot activity, enough so that the gigantic spots could
                be seen on the sun's surface with the naked eye. The combination of the two
                natural events was that throughout 1816 the residual impact upon the world's
                climes literally created a year without a summer. For example, the Quebec
                Gazette of May 12, 1816 recorded:

                "...The season continues extremely unfavourable to agriculture. Yesterday
                morning there was ice of considerable thickness formed during the night.
                Masses of snow still lie in the fields and very little wheat has been sown
                in the district..."

                Snow fell in Quebec, Trois Rivieres and Montreal on June 6, while
                temperatures hovered around freezing point until the 10th of the month.
                There were frosts recorded throughout July in Montreal and Quebec and began
                again as early as the second week in September. The year's highest recorded
                temperature at Quebec City in August was 72 degrees F. Finally, by October
                17, 1816, the ice was so thick in the St. Lawrence River that all shipping
                had to be terminated for the season.

                My researches only extended to the area of Lower Canada for the book, but
                one can surmise that it was no less severe in Upper Canada. Just at a time
                when the entire agricultural infrastructure was attempting to become
                reestablished after the depradations suffered during the war. Tough times
                indeed!


                Richard Feltoe







                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Craig Williams" <sgtwarner@...>
                To: <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 2:55 PM
                Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: 'Pompeii of the East' discovered


                > Mr. Randle is quite correct. The dates don't jibe.
                >
                > Incidentally, the Tambora eruption did cause weather disturbances
                > that were felt in North America that year though. The ash in the
                > atmosphere caused a cooling and subsequent crop failure in North
                > America. Because of this there was a famine here. The Native
                > population referred to 1815 as "the year with no summer".
                >
                > Craig Williams
                >
                > On 28-Feb-06, at 2:28 PM, Camp Chief wrote:
                >
                > > How could this be if the eruption did not take place until April
                > > 10th, 1815?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > David Randle
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Furthermore, the program suggested that there may have been some
                > > effect on
                > > the weather during the Battle of New Orleans indirectly aiding
                > > Jackson's
                > > victory. At any rate, the eruption of Mount Tambora made the
                > > eruption of
                > > Mount St. Helens look like a little belch. I found it fascinating.
                > >
                > > Jim Krause
                > > fifer
                > >
                > > _____
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
                > > hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
                > > fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
                > >
                > > Unit Contact information for North America:
                > > ---------------------------------
                > > Crown Forces Unit Listing:
                > > http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
                > >
                > > American Forces Unit Listing
                > > http://usforces1812.tripod.com
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
                square miles...
                >
                > Unit Contact information for North America:
                > ---------------------------------
                > Crown Forces Unit Listing:
                > http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
                >
                > American Forces Unit Listing
                > http://usforces1812.tripod.com
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Craig Williams
                According to the United States Geological Service the Tambora eruption caused 92000 deaths, most, apparently by famine. There was also an outbreak of collera
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 1, 2006
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                  According to the United States Geological Service the Tambora
                  eruption caused 92000 deaths, most, apparently by famine. There was
                  also an outbreak of collera attributed to the aftermath of the Volcano.
                  The dust and aerosols in the air dropped global temperatures by as
                  much as 3 degrees.

                  Craig W
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