Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Muskets 'n Stuff

Expand Messages
  • md5_yager
    In several arms shipment documents dated during the American Rev War, stand of arms references include separate identification of a identical number of
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 5, 2005
      In several arms shipment documents dated during the American Rev
      War, "stand of arms" references include separate identification of a
      identical number of 'cartouche boxes', e.g. 300 stand of arms, 300
      cartouche boxes; twelve hundred stand of arms, twelve hundred cartouche
      boxes, etc. Flints, powder, lead are identified separately. The
      references do not separately identify bayonets, carriages, etc.

      There seems to be only one interpretation, i.e. a "stand of arms" is
      one musket (and presumably also its bayonet). As the colonies were
      British, it seems certain their use of the term would be identical to
      the use of the term in the rest of the Empire.

      Dave
      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, dancingbobd@w... wrote:
      >
      > Greetings,
      >
      > I am far from being an authority on Stand of Arms.
      >
      > In 1803 the papers transferring Private John Potts to Capt. M. Lewis
      for
      > the L & C expedition consisted of one listing his clothing and one
      > listing musket, bayonet & scabbard, cartridge box, belt plate. flints
      > and I think 12 cartridges. Would seem to describe a stand of arms to
      > me. Steve or Dave, help me here!
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Bob Dorian
      > [seldom a pvt. soldier]
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.