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Muskets 'n Stuff

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  • lalozon
    From: Gordon Deans The most common number given for captured stands of arms at Detroit (1812) is 2500. Remember also that I came
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 5, 2005
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      From: "Gordon Deans" <gord.deans@...>

      The most common number given for captured stands of arms at Detroit (1812)
      is 2500. Remember also that I came across a number of references which
      reported that militia units is western Upper Canada were known to be
      equipped with actual French muskets from British arsenals (which were so
      listed) at the beginning of 1812.





      In the Militia Return dated 24 March 1813, the Fifth Company of the 1st
      Regiment, Kent Militia commanded by Captain John Dolsen. This was a Rifle
      Company with one hundred and sixteen issued government rifles and thirty
      additional privately owned rifles.

      In another Militia Return dated (??) [I don't have the date at hand] it
      reports that the 1st Regiment, Kent Militia were issues British Military
      muskets with an auxiliary issue of US Military muskets from the fall of Fort
      Detroit.

      It seems the Kents were issued Government arms

      For those not from North America, Kent County is in South Western Ontario
      approx. 45 miles from Windsor which is across the river from Detroit. It is
      now the regional government of Chatham-Kent


      Yrs.,
      L2
    • dancingbobd@webtv.net
      Greetings, I am far from being an authority on Stand of Arms. In 1803 the papers transferring Private John Potts to Capt. M. Lewis for the L & C expedition
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 5, 2005
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        Greetings,

        I am far from being an authority on Stand of Arms.

        In 1803 the papers transferring Private John Potts to Capt. M. Lewis for
        the L & C expedition consisted of one listing his clothing and one
        listing musket, bayonet & scabbard, cartridge box, belt plate. flints
        and I think 12 cartridges. Would seem to describe a stand of arms to
        me. Steve or Dave, help me here!

        Regards,

        Bob Dorian
        [seldom a pvt. soldier]
      • md5_yager
        In several arms shipment documents dated during the American Rev War, stand of arms references include separate identification of a identical number of
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 5, 2005
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          In several arms shipment documents dated during the American Rev
          War, "stand of arms" references include separate identification of a
          identical number of 'cartouche boxes', e.g. 300 stand of arms, 300
          cartouche boxes; twelve hundred stand of arms, twelve hundred cartouche
          boxes, etc. Flints, powder, lead are identified separately. The
          references do not separately identify bayonets, carriages, etc.

          There seems to be only one interpretation, i.e. a "stand of arms" is
          one musket (and presumably also its bayonet). As the colonies were
          British, it seems certain their use of the term would be identical to
          the use of the term in the rest of the Empire.

          Dave
          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, dancingbobd@w... wrote:
          >
          > Greetings,
          >
          > I am far from being an authority on Stand of Arms.
          >
          > In 1803 the papers transferring Private John Potts to Capt. M. Lewis
          for
          > the L & C expedition consisted of one listing his clothing and one
          > listing musket, bayonet & scabbard, cartridge box, belt plate. flints
          > and I think 12 cartridges. Would seem to describe a stand of arms to
          > me. Steve or Dave, help me here!
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Bob Dorian
          > [seldom a pvt. soldier]
          >
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