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In the beginning . . .

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  • lalozon
    From: Craig Williams I also failed to mention the centennial Tattoo/Pageant of 1967 that included Canadian soldiers dressed in
    Message 1 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
      From: "Craig Williams" <sgtwarner@...>

      I also failed to mention the centennial Tattoo/Pageant of 1967 that
      included Canadian soldiers dressed in reproduced WW1 uniforms "recreating"
      an over the top attack.


      ------------------------


      1967 was also the year that the "BATTLE OF THE THAMES" (Warof 1812) was
      presented at Chatham Ontario.
      It was part of the city's Centennial Project (1967 was Canada's Centennial.
      Confederation 1867.)

      The Canadian Army Reserve wore red coated uniforms and the local black
      powder club portrayed the American Forces. The Natives were from the three
      Indian Reserves in the area.


      It was repeated three years later in 1970.


      Yrs.,

      L2
    • Colin
      Down here in the Boston area we have an abundance of AWI reenactments and reenactors. The history here is very interesting. In 1825, the men of Lexington
      Message 2 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
        Down here in the Boston area we have an abundance of AWI reenactments
        and reenactors. The history here is very interesting. In 1825, the men of
        Lexington re-enacted the Battle on Lexington Green for the 50th anniversary.
        Some of the actual participants in the battle took part...though much slower I
        imagine.

        Colin Murphy
        USS Con
        1812 MG
      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        ... Actualy re-enactments are far older than that, gladiatorial combat started as re-creations of aincient battles to honour the dead. I think the first
        Message 3 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
          In a message dated 11/1/05 1:20:48 AM, ms_civie@... writes:


          > I found this very fascinating as I had no idea that our hobby went
          > back over 150 years.  But it did leave me wondering about the origins
          > of reenactments in Canada and for the War of 1812.  Does anyone know
          > approximately when they emerged and became popularized?
          >

          Actualy re-enactments are far older than that, gladiatorial combat started as
          re-creations of aincient battles to honour the dead. I think the first
          re-enactments of the type we do took place in London during the Napoleonic wars
          where Peninsular war actions wouild be re-staged to encourage the public
          (sometimes by newlt returned regiments). Then of ciourse there was the Eglington
          Topunament of 18(35?) where medieval re-enactment was born.

          Cheers

          Tim



          Timothy Pickles



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Terry Lubka
          I read somewhere that at one of the first recreations of an ACW battle was having veterans of Pickett s charge actually walk across that field. When the old
          Message 4 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
            I read somewhere that at one of the first 'recreations' of an ACW
            battle was having veterans of Pickett's charge actually walk across
            that field. When the old Rebs made it to the small stone wall or
            Highwater mark some of them actually started fistfights with the Union
            vets!
            In Canada interest from the general population in reenacting started
            during the centennial year when numerous 1812 forts did mock battles.



            Terry
            22nd US
          • Terry Lubka
            I read somewhere that at one of the first recreations of an ACW battle was having veterans of Pickett s charge actually walk across that field. When the old
            Message 5 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
              I read somewhere that at one of the first 'recreations' of an ACW
              battle was having veterans of Pickett's charge actually walk across
              that field. When the old Rebs made it to the small stone wall or
              Highwater mark some of them actually started fistfights with the Union
              vets!
              In Canada interest from the general population in reenacting started
              during the centennial year when numerous 1812 forts did mock battles.



              Terry
              22nd US
            • suthren@magma.ca
              Dear Terry I read an account of an 1893 restaging of Pickett s Charge at Gettysburg. The veterans took up their respective positions and as the Confederates
              Message 6 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                Dear Terry

                I read an account of an 1893 restaging of Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg.
                The veterans took up their respective positions and as the Confederates
                approached, the Union veterans rose up with a roar of approval and went down
                to meet them for handshakes and embraces. Many tears flowed.

                Vic
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Terry Lubka" <tlubka@...>
                To: <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 11:26 AM
                Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: In the beginning . . .


                > I read somewhere that at one of the first 'recreations' of an ACW
                > battle was having veterans of Pickett's charge actually walk across
                > that field. When the old Rebs made it to the small stone wall or
                > Highwater mark some of them actually started fistfights with the Union
                > vets!
                > In Canada interest from the general population in reenacting started
                > during the centennial year when numerous 1812 forts did mock battles.
                >
                >
                >
                > Terry
                > 22nd US
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
                square miles...
                >
                > Unit Contact information for North America:
                > ---------------------------------
                > Crown Forces Unit Listing:
                > http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
                >
                > American Forces Unit Listing
                > http://usforces1812.tripod.com
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > No virus found in this incoming message.
                > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                > Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.6/152 - Release Date: 31/10/05
                >
                >
              • PEGGY MATHEWS
                And we can t forget, however much we might try, the episode in I think Sharpe s Regiment where he recreates the mythical taking of the Eagle at Talavera to
                Message 7 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                  And we can't forget, however much we might try, the episode in I think "Sharpe's Regiment" where he "recreates" the mythical taking of the Eagle at Talavera to get the Prince of Wales to make them his own regiment, thereby saving them from being broken up. Ah Sharpie, e's a clever boy.

                  On the serious side, I recall reading about a big ceremony called something like "The Presentation of the Eagles" in England in 1811 or 1812. But there was no mention in the bit I read about a reenactment.

                  Michael M.


                  "We must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it --
                  but we must sail, and not drift, nor lie at anchor." -- Oliver
                  Wendell Holmes
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: BritcomHMP@...<mailto:BritcomHMP@...>
                  To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com<mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 9:15 AM
                  Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] In the beginning . . .



                  In a message dated 11/1/05 1:20:48 AM, ms_civie@...<mailto:ms_civie@...> writes:


                  > I found this very fascinating as I had no idea that our hobby went
                  > back over 150 years. But it did leave me wondering about the origins
                  > of reenactments in Canada and for the War of 1812. Does anyone know
                  > approximately when they emerged and became popularized?
                  >

                  Actualy re-enactments are far older than that, gladiatorial combat started as
                  re-creations of aincient battles to honour the dead. I think the first
                  re-enactments of the type we do took place in London during the Napoleonic wars
                  where Peninsular war actions wouild be re-staged to encourage the public
                  (sometimes by newly returned regiments). Then of course there was the Eglington
                  Topunament of 18(35?) where medieval re-enactment was born.

                  Cheers

                  Tim




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Richard Feltoe
                  Erika, In Carl Benn s book, Historic Fort York published in 1993, page 152 has a photo of the Fort York opening day celebrations on Victoria Day 1934. In
                  Message 8 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                    Erika,
                    In Carl Benn's book, "Historic Fort York" published in 1993, page 152 has a
                    photo of the Fort York opening day celebrations on Victoria Day 1934. In
                    this image, as well as various dignitaries, a sailor in "modern" uniform and
                    a two groups of ladies from what appears to be in the first instance an
                    Ukranian and in the second, a Highland dance group (OMG multiculturalism was
                    there then too!!!); there are a pair of ladies in quasi late 18th century
                    dresses (perhaps a la Simcoe?) and a pair of infantrymen wearing an
                    identifiably redcoat /dark pants / white crossbelts / stovepipe shako, kit.

                    I think this is the earliest identifiable image that I'm aware of for an
                    "1812 reenactor" in conjunction with that site or any other in the Ontario.
                    however, you do pose an interesting question and I'm going to see if
                    anything else crops up in some of the picture collections I have links to.
                    Regards
                    Richard Feltoe
                  • spikeyj@crosslink.net
                    ... Polish; my daughter s dance costume is virtually identical. Spike Y Jones
                    Message 9 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                      On Tue, 1 Nov 2005, Richard Feltoe wrote:

                      > In Carl Benn's book, "Historic Fort York" published in 1993, page 152 has a
                      > photo of the Fort York opening day celebrations on Victoria Day 1934. In
                      > this image, as well as various dignitaries, a sailor in "modern" uniform and
                      > a two groups of ladies from what appears to be in the first instance an
                      > Ukranian...

                      Polish; my daughter's dance costume is virtually identical.

                      Spike Y Jones
                    • Richard Feltoe
                      I stand humbly corrected Richard
                      Message 10 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                        I stand humbly corrected
                        Richard
                      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                        In a message dated 11/1/2005 5:12:27 PM Central Standard Time, ciefranche21e@msn.com writes: And we can t forget, however much we might try, the episode in I
                        Message 11 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                          In a message dated 11/1/2005 5:12:27 PM Central Standard Time,
                          ciefranche21e@... writes:

                          And we can't forget, however much we might try, the episode in I think
                          "Sharpe's Regiment" where he "recreates" the mythical taking of the Eagle at
                          Talavera to get the Prince of Wales to make them his own regiment, thereby saving
                          them from being broken up. Ah Sharpie, e's a clever boy.

                          On the serious side, I recall reading about a big ceremony called something
                          like "The Presentation of the Eagles" in England in 1811 or 1812. But there
                          was no mention in the bit I read about a reenactment.



                          >>

                          As you know Michael Mr. Cornwell usualy gets his best ideas from history
                          books and the the 'Sharpe' thing is based on an actual 're-enactment' of the
                          period but I can't remember wether at Hyde Park or Windsor. I do recall it was
                          at the Prince Regent's instigation and I think most of the troops were
                          volunteers. As I have just got back home I will be able to look this up shortly.

                          Cheers

                          Tim


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • PEGGY MATHEWS
                          The event I was trying to remember (tune out now folks if Napoleonics put you off) was May 18, 1811. A big procession with the Foot Guards decked out in their
                          Message 12 of 17 , Nov 1, 2005
                            The event I was trying to remember (tune out now folks if Napoleonics put you off) was May 18, 1811. A big procession with the Foot Guards decked out in their finest paraded assorted French trophies along a long route, ending with the "formal act of obeisance and humiliation of the vanquished" (General Regnault "Les Aigles Imperiales et le Drapeau Tricolore). The highlight was the Eagle taken at Barossa, though the others were much older. Five taken in the Antilles, a flag captured in Egypt, a fortress standard taken in Spain, a pennon of the 2nd Bttn. 5th Ligne, two flags w/o Eagles of the 2nd and 3rd Prussian (taken at Walcheren), and a color of a provisional regiment. Certainly could have been more ceremonies than this though. I don't recall in which year Mr. Cornwell set his event.

                            In "Napoleon's War in Spain" by Henri Lachouque, Jean Tranie and J-C Carnigniani they assert that "in seven years of campaigning in Spain the French took 387 trophies, among which were 320 Spanish colours, 45 Portuguese colours and 22 British colours. The French army had lost only 11 Eagles, 8 of which had fallen to the British." p.125. There is no documentation of the numbers however. I can only think of a little over a half dozen British standards lost. Perhaps some were unofficial pennons or markers. The work otherwise is fairly balanced IMHO and numbers typically jive with other sources.

                            Sincerely,
                            Michael


                            "We must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it --
                            but we must sail, and not drift, nor lie at anchor." -- Oliver
                            Wendell Holmes
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: BritcomHMP@...<mailto:BritcomHMP@...>
                            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com<mailto:WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 9:54 PM
                            Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] In the beginning . . .



                            In a message dated 11/1/2005 5:12:27 PM Central Standard Time,
                            ciefranche21e@...<mailto:ciefranche21e@...> writes:

                            And we can't forget, however much we might try, the episode in I think
                            "Sharpe's Regiment" where he "recreates" the mythical taking of the Eagle at
                            Talavera to get the Prince of Wales to make them his own regiment, thereby saving
                            them from being broken up. Ah Sharpie, e's a clever boy.

                            On the serious side, I recall reading about a big ceremony called something
                            like "The Presentation of the Eagles" in England in 1811 or 1812. But there
                            was no mention in the bit I read about a reenactment.



                            >>

                            As you know Michael Mr. Cornwell usualy gets his best ideas from history
                            books and the the 'Sharpe' thing is based on an actual 're-enactment' of the
                            period but I can't remember wether at Hyde Park or Windsor. I do recall it was
                            at the Prince Regent's instigation and I think most of the troops were
                            volunteers. As I have just got back home I will be able to look this up shortly.

                            Cheers

                            Tim


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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