Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [WarOf1812] sword

Expand Messages
  • Kevin Windsor
    And as a Material Culturist and Curator, I would advise donating it to the local Museum. (with all of the information that Ray suggested) He would receive
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 4, 2005
      And as a Material Culturist and Curator, I would advise donating it to the
      local Museum. (with all of the information that Ray suggested) He would
      receive either a tax receipt or possibly cash, but it would be
      professionally cared for, professionally exhibited, stored according to
      Ontario Museum standards, and there forever, and appreciated by all.

      and BTW Ray the best conservators at the CWM are from the Canadian
      Conservation Institute.

      Kevin
      89th Reg't
      (and also a trained Museum professional!!)


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "ray hobbs" <ray.hobbs@...>

      As an archaeologist, I would advise complete annotation on the precise
      location of its find, down to the last centimetre. Orient all compass
      measurements from the north. Also, if it applies, measure the depth of
      its burial.

      Whatever your friend does DO NOT CLEAN IT - I repeat DO NOT CLEAN
      IT!!!!!! This should be done by a professional museum conservator -
      some of the best are at the CWM and Museum of Civilization, Otawa -
      Gatineau. Modern abrasives or cleansers would ruin it.

      Hope this helps
      Ray
      41st Regt.
    • Craig Williams
      I agree with Mr. Hobbs on almost all points here except the 1796 light Cav. part . Although it could very likely be a Brit pattern, I think it also possible
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 4, 2005
        I agree with Mr. Hobbs on almost all points here except the 1796
        light Cav. part . Although it could very likely be a Brit pattern, I
        think it also possible that it could be a US sabre manufactured by
        STAR who were as spotty at marking their swords as some of the Brit
        contractors.
        The reason I say this, is that the blade doesn't seem wide enough for
        a 1796 pattern. It would be a big help to have the measurements and
        weight.
        Also, the guard has a less "decisive" appearance to the "D" than what
        one normally sees in the 1796.
        There is one other possibility, and that is a light company officers
        sword. Again, size and weight have a great deal to do with
        identifying this type.


        Craig Williams


        On 4-Oct-05, at 6:03 PM, ray hobbs wrote:

        > Dave:
        > It is a 1796 pattern British Light Cavalry Sabre (one very similar was
        > also used by the US forces).
        > There is another original in the small museum at Fairfield.
        > It is the same pattern as one that would have been used by the
        > Provincial Dragoons, The Canadian Light Dragoons (Coleman's Troop)
        > along the Thames in 1813.
        > It is in extremely good condition.
        >
        > As an archaeologist, I would advise complete annotation on the precise
        > location of its find, down to the last centimetre. Orient all compass
        > measurements from the north. Also, if it applies, measure the depth of
        > its burial.
        >
        > Whatever your friend does DO NOT CLEAN IT - I repeat DO NOT CLEAN
        > IT!!!!!! This should be done by a professional museum conservator -
        > some of the best are at the CWM and Museum of Civilization, Otawa -
        > Gatineau. Modern abrasives or cleansers would ruin it.
        >
        > Hope this helps
        > Ray
        > 41st Regt.
        > On Tuesday, October 4, 2005, at 04:14 PM, Dave Westhouse wrote:
        >
        >
        >> Hello list,
        >>
        >> I have posted 4 photos of a sword in the photos section. A friend
        >> from
        >> work found the sword in a hollowed out log on his farm in the Simcoe,
        >> Ontario area. Southwestern Ontario.
        >>
        >> It is complete with scabard and appears to me, the untrained eye, to
        >> be a regular cavalry soldiers sword.
        >>
        >> There are no identifiable marks on the blade or handle.
        >>
        >> It is rather plain in appearance but in relatively good shape.
        >>
        >> The question this gentleman has is how old is it? How would he find
        >> out? What should he do with it, as in cleaning or restoring?
        >>
        >> Thank you, any input would be greatly appreciated.
        >>
        >> Dave Westhouse, Corporal
        >> 1st (Royal Scots) Grenadiers
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
        >> hundreds
        >> of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
        >> THOUSANDS of square miles...
        >>
        >> Unit Contact information for North America:
        >> ---------------------------------
        >> Crown Forces Unit Listing:
        >> http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
        >>
        >> American Forces Unit Listing
        >> http://usforces1812.tripod.com
        >>
        >>
        >>
        > <image.tiff>
        >
        >>
        >> YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >>
        >> + Visit your group "WarOf1812" on the web.
        >>
        >> + To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        >> WarOf1812-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >>
        >> + Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        >> Service.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        > <image.tiff>
        >
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------
        > ~-->
        > Life without art & music? Keep the arts alive today at Network for
        > Good!
        > http://us.click.yahoo.com/FXrMlA/dnQLAA/Zx0JAA/PJ_qlB/TM
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        > ~->
        >
        > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
        > hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
        > fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
        >
        > Unit Contact information for North America:
        > ---------------------------------
        > Crown Forces Unit Listing:
        > http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
        >
        > American Forces Unit Listing
        > http://usforces1812.tripod.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.