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Canada owes much to Historic Nancy?

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  • Kevin Windsor
    from CanWest News service. If not for the Nancy, you would likely be speaking American today. ???? WOW! I didn t know how truly significant that battle was!
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 2 7:21 AM
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      from CanWest News service.
      "If not for the Nancy, you would likely be speaking American
      today."????
      WOW! I didn't know how truly significant that battle was! And to
      think you can watch it with "700 re-enactors tell Nancy's exciting
      story with their roaring cannons, blazing muskets, slashing
      tomahawks and fierce war cries."

      With tongue in cheek!
      Kevin
      89th Reg't


      TRAVEL
      Canadians owe a debt to historic little Nancy
      By capturing two U.S. ships in the War of 1812, the crew of the
      Nancy help turn the tide in the Upper Great Lakes

      Pat Brennan
      Special to The Vancouver Sun

      If not for the Nancy, you would likely be speaking American today.

      That means you'd know the exact date of your next federal election,
      you wouldn't know what Smarties are and you might pretend to be
      Canadian when travelling overseas.

      Of course, you would also be paying less for gas and claiming your
      mortgage payments as tax deductions. But the Nancy changed all that.

      The little merchant schooner Nancy, with her brave and creative
      crew, played a major role in ensuring that Canada is what it is
      today, eh.

      And that's why 5,000 spectators will gather in Wasaga Beach
      Provincial Park on Georgian Bay next month to watch 700 re-enactors
      tell Nancy's exciting story with their roaring cannons, blazing
      muskets, slashing tomahawks and fierce war cries.

      Nancy wasn't meant to be a fighter. She was hired to carry supplies
      between British outposts on the upper Great Lakes. And that's just
      what she was doing during the War of 1812 when the Americans put her
      on their hit list and sent out three frigates to hunt her down.

      The Americans controlled shipping on the upper lakes after pounding
      the British fleet in the Battle of Lake Erie. Only The Nancy
      remained to supply the vital British fort at Michilimackinac near
      Sault Ste. Marie, which controlled Lake Huron, Lake Superior and
      lands to the west.

      Troops and supplies bypassed the American fleet by coming up from
      York (Toronto) via Lake Simcoe and the Nottawasaga River where the
      Nancy lay at the mouth of the Nottawasaga to carry them on to Fort
      Michilimackinac.

      The three American gunboats knew her routine and decided to wait at
      the mouth of the Nottawasaga to blast her into history when she
      returned from Michilimackinac. However, Nancy wasn't out on Georgian
      Bay. Spies had tipped off her skipper, Lt. Miller Worsley of the
      Royal Navy, that the American vessels were coming for her, so
      Worsley sneaked Nancy deeper up the river to hide her in the woods.

      An American shore party gathering firewood discovered the ruse and
      it wasn't long before the three Yankee gunboats unleashed their big
      weapons on the Nancy's hiding place.

      They lobbed cannon balls and projectiles over the narrow neck of
      land separating the river from Georgian Bay, and the Americans had
      accurate gun crews.

      With the Nancy ablaze, Worsley got his crew of 22 sailors, 23
      Indians and nine French Canadian voyageurs off the vessel and into
      the woods. They all escaped and eventually did a midnight run in
      freight canoes past the American blockade and paddled 360 miles (580
      km) west to Michilimackinac.

      The Americans came looking for them and, after resting at Fort
      Michilimackinac, the crew of the Nancy came looking for the
      Americans.

      They paddled their canoes at night out to the American gunboat
      Tigress, anchored along Huron's north shore. They climbed aboard,
      overran the crew and captured the ship.

      The next day they used the same game to capture Scorpion, America's
      other warship hunting the Nancy's crew.

      The courage and cunning of Nancy's crew on Georgian Bay turned the
      tide in the campaign for the Upper Lakes.
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