Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

"Squire"

Expand Messages
  • lalozon
    From: Ask Yahoo!: Monday June 6, 2005 ___________- What does it mean when someone has esquire after their name? ....... The original title comes from the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 7, 2005
      From: Ask Yahoo!: Monday June 6, 2005
      ___________-


      What does it mean when someone has "esquire" after their name?

      .......

      The original title comes from the Middle Ages -- an esquire was the
      rank above a gentleman, and below a knight. The word derives from the Latin
      scutum (shield), and Middle English esquier (shield bearer). It was also
      generally applied to upstanding members of society: judges, sheriffs,
      lawyers, professors.

      The title was eventually adopted almost exclusively by the British legal
      profession. There were still plenty of non-lawyer esquires (the title was
      often passed down to eldest sons), but it was very popular among barristers.
      The title was often shortened to "Squire."

      Today in the United States, the title is mostly used as a sign of courtesy
      toward members of the legal profession. It also pops up in the stationary of
      lawyers who think of themselves highly. It's a formal address that has no
      specific meaning.

      However, if you want to get, um, legal about it, the use of the title
      "esquire" could be downright treasonous. The U.S. Constitution forbids
      aristocratic titles. The Articles of Confederation state that: "nor shall
      the United States in Congress assembled, or any of them, grant any title of
      nobility."
      _____________


      Interesting and awaiting comments from Mon Ami, the Squire of Titchmarsh
      ............

      Yrs.,
      L2
    • suthren@magma.ca
      Similarly, Canada abolished the right to use titles of nobility in the 1930s, although it has been continued in other parts of the Commonwealth, such as in
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 7, 2005
        Similarly, Canada abolished the right to use titles of nobility in the
        1930s, although it has been continued in other parts of the Commonwealth,
        such as in Australia and New Zealand.

        Vic Suthren
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "lalozon" <lalozon@...>
        To: "Onelist WarOf1812" <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 1:20 PM
        Subject: [WarOf1812] "Squire"


        > From: Ask Yahoo!: Monday June 6, 2005
        > ___________-
        >
        >
        > What does it mean when someone has "esquire" after their name?
        >
        > .......
        >
        > The original title comes from the Middle Ages -- an esquire was
        the
        > rank above a gentleman, and below a knight. The word derives from the
        Latin
        > scutum (shield), and Middle English esquier (shield bearer). It was also
        > generally applied to upstanding members of society: judges, sheriffs,
        > lawyers, professors.
        >
        > The title was eventually adopted almost exclusively by the British legal
        > profession. There were still plenty of non-lawyer esquires (the title was
        > often passed down to eldest sons), but it was very popular among
        barristers.
        > The title was often shortened to "Squire."
        >
        > Today in the United States, the title is mostly used as a sign of courtesy
        > toward members of the legal profession. It also pops up in the stationary
        of
        > lawyers who think of themselves highly. It's a formal address that has no
        > specific meaning.
        >
        > However, if you want to get, um, legal about it, the use of the title
        > "esquire" could be downright treasonous. The U.S. Constitution forbids
        > aristocratic titles. The Articles of Confederation state that: "nor shall
        > the United States in Congress assembled, or any of them, grant any title
        of
        > nobility."
        > _____________
        >
        >
        > Interesting and awaiting comments from Mon Ami, the Squire of Titchmarsh
        > ............
        >
        > Yrs.,
        > L2
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
        square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
        square miles...
        >
        > Unit Contact information for North America:
        > ---------------------------------
        > Crown Forces Unit Listing:
        > http://1812crownforces.tripod.com
        >
        > American Forces Unit Listing
        > http://usforces1812.tripod.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
        > Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.6.5 - Release Date: 07/06/05
        >
        >
      • Donlyn Meyers
        In the US a person is addressed as the Honorable if they have been an elected official at any time, from dogcatcher to Senator. Donlyn Meyers Smoke and Fire
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 7, 2005
          In the US a person is addressed as the "Honorable" if they have been an elected official at any time, from dogcatcher to Senator.
          Donlyn Meyers
          Smoke and Fire Co. Publishing Smoke and Fire News
          27 N. River Rd. Waterville, Ohio 43566 1-800-766-5334
          dmeyers@... www.smoke-fire.com

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: lalozon
          To: Onelist WarOf1812
          Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2005 1:20 PM
          Subject: [WarOf1812] "Squire"


          From: Ask Yahoo!: Monday June 6, 2005
          ___________-


          What does it mean when someone has "esquire" after their name?

          .......

          The original title comes from the Middle Ages -- an esquire was the
          rank above a gentleman, and below a knight. The word derives from the Latin
          scutum (shield), and Middle English esquier (shield bearer). It was also
          generally applied to upstanding members of society: judges, sheriffs,
          lawyers, professors.

          The title was eventually adopted almost exclusively by the British legal
          profession. There were still plenty of non-lawyer esquires (the title was
          often passed down to eldest sons), but it was very popular among barristers.
          The title was often shortened to "Squire."

          Today in the United States, the title is mostly used as a sign of courtesy
          toward members of the legal profession. It also pops up in the stationary of
          lawyers who think of themselves highly. It's a formal address that has no
          specific meaning.

          However, if you want to get, um, legal about it, the use of the title
          "esquire" could be downright treasonous. The U.S. Constitution forbids
          aristocratic titles. The Articles of Confederation state that: "nor shall
          the United States in Congress assembled, or any of them, grant any title of
          nobility."
          _____________


          Interesting and awaiting comments from Mon Ami, the Squire of Titchmarsh
          ............

          Yrs.,
          L2







          The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

          Unit Contact information for North America:
          ---------------------------------
          Crown Forces Unit Listing:
          http://1812crownforces.tripod.com

          American Forces Unit Listing
          http://usforces1812.tripod.com



          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WarOf1812/

          b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          WarOf1812-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Angela Gottfred
          ... elected official at any ... In Canada, the terms honourable and right honourable are used for a variety of people. The Honourable [Name] is either: - a
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 7, 2005
            > In the US a person is addressed as the "Honorable" if they have been an
            elected official at any
            > time, from dogcatcher to Senator.

            In Canada, the terms "honourable" and "right honourable" are used for a variety
            of people.
            The Honourable [Name] is either:
            - a former lieutenant-governor of a province
            - the commissioner of a territory (while in office only)
            - the premier of a province (while in office only)
            - the government leader of a territory (while in office only)
            - a cabinet minister for a province or territory (while in office only)
            - a judge of a provincial or federal superior court, appeals court, or court of
            Queen's bench
            - a judge of a provincial or territorial court (but *not* to be called "your
            honour" in court)
            - a member or former member of the federal cabinet
            - a speaker of the Senate or House of Commons
            - a member of Parliament or the Senate


            The Right Honourable [Name] is either:
            - a governor-general or former governor-general of Canada
            - a prime minister or former prime minister of Canada
            - a member of the federal cabinet
            - the Chief Justice of Canada

            Your humble and obedient servant,
            Angela Gottfred





            > -----Original Message-----
            > In the US a person is addressed as the "Honorable" if they have been an
            elected official at any
            > time, from dogcatcher to Senator.
          • Dale
            My dear departed grandfather used to say of Canadian politicians: They re nothing but a bunch of goddamned crooks... and they have the unmitigated
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 8, 2005
              <chuckle> My dear departed grandfather used to say of Canadian
              politicians: "They're nothing but a bunch of goddamned crooks... and
              they have the unmitigated GALL to refer to themselves as HONOURABLE!"

              Hmmm.... come to think of it, the events of the past couple of years
              seem to bear out his viewpoint pretty well!

              Keep your powder dry.
              ~Dale

              >
              > In Canada, the terms "honourable" and "right honourable" are used
              for a variety
              > of people.
              > The Honourable [Name] is either:
              > - a former lieutenant-governor of a province
              > - the commissioner of a territory (while in office only)
              > - the premier of a province (while in office only)
              > - the government leader of a territory (while in office only)
              > - a cabinet minister for a province or territory (while in office
              only)
              > - a judge of a provincial or federal superior court, appeals court,
              or court of
              > Queen's bench
              > - a judge of a provincial or territorial court (but *not* to be
              called "your
              > honour" in court)
              > - a member or former member of the federal cabinet
              > - a speaker of the Senate or House of Commons
              > - a member of Parliament or the Senate
              >
              >
              > The Right Honourable [Name] is either:
              > - a governor-general or former governor-general of Canada
              > - a prime minister or former prime minister of Canada
              > - a member of the federal cabinet
              > - the Chief Justice of Canada
              >
              > Your humble and obedient servant,
              > Angela Gottfred
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.