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Moving Mortars

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  • spikeyj@crosslink.net
    Question: What mode of transport was used to move large mortars from place to place; e.g., to get them to the site of a siege not readily accessible by ship?
    Message 1 of 4 , May 31 4:49 PM
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      Question: What mode of transport was used to move large mortars from
      place to place; e.g., to get them to the site of a siege not readily
      accessible by ship? Did they have individual carriages, or were they
      just loaded onto big wagons, to be manhandled off when the site was
      reached?

      Spike Y Jones
    • abateman
      ... From: ... They were carried on a sling wagon or a sling cart and then manhandled into position. A sling wagon looks like a
      Message 2 of 4 , May 31 6:14 PM
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <spikeyj@...>


        > Question: What mode of transport was used to move large mortars from
        > place to place; e.g., to get them to the site of a siege not readily
        > accessible by ship?

        They were carried on a "sling wagon" or a "sling cart" and then manhandled
        into position. A "sling wagon" looks like a wagon with wooden rails instead
        of a bed and a wooden rail ramp that folds down at the back. The mortar
        sitting in its bed would be hauled up onto the wagon with a windlass (like a
        boat onto a trailer) and lashed down. The Osprey New Vanguard book #65
        (British Napoleonic Artillery 1793-1815 (2) - Siege and Coastal Artillery)
        has a good picture on page 22. The "sling cart" had two large wheels (about
        7 feet in diameter) and the mortar or gun barrel was slung underneath it,
        not far off the ground.

        Andrew Bateman, 41st Foot
      • Peter Monahan
        What, no outboard mortar boats? ============================================================ From: abateman Date: 2005/05/31 Tue PM
        Message 3 of 4 , May 31 8:48 PM
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          What, no outboard mortar boats?
          ============================================================
          From: "abateman" <abateman@...>
          Date: 2005/05/31 Tue PM 09:14:11 EST
          To: <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Moving Mortars

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <spikeyj@...>


          > Question: What mode of transport was used to move large mortars from
          > place to place; e.g., to get them to the site of a siege not readily
          > accessible by ship?

          They were carried on a "sling wagon" or a "sling cart" and then manhandled
          into position. A "sling wagon" looks like a wagon with wooden rails instead
          of a bed and a wooden rail ramp that folds down at the back. The mortar
          sitting in its bed would be hauled up onto the wagon with a windlass (like a
          boat onto a trailer) and lashed down. The Osprey New Vanguard book #65
          (British Napoleonic Artillery 1793-1815 (2) - Siege and Coastal Artillery)
          has a good picture on page 22. The "sling cart" had two large wheels (about
          7 feet in diameter) and the mortar or gun barrel was slung underneath it,
          not far off the ground.

          Andrew Bateman, 41st Foot





          The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

          Unit Contact information for North America:
          ---------------------------------
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          ============================================================


          Peter Monahan
          petemonahan@...
          705-435-0953 H / 905-936-4743 W
        • spikeyj@crosslink.net
          ... Well, in the original question I did specify sites not readily accessible by ship. Spike Y Jones
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1, 2005
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            On Tue, 31 May 2005, Peter Monahan wrote:

            > What, no outboard mortar boats?

            Well, in the original question I did specify sites not readily
            accessible by ship.

            Spike Y Jones

            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: <spikeyj@...>
            >
            > > Question: What mode of transport was used to move large mortars from
            > > place to place; e.g., to get them to the site of a siege not readily
            > > accessible by ship?
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