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Re: Safety

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  • Roger Fuller
    ... Oh, dear.. as this looks like it could be a contentious issue, and I don t want to start a political row in a scene I am quite new in, interested parties,
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 3, 1998
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      >Safety!!!
      >
      >Somebody had to go and bring that up, eh? (Sorry, Canadian! The "Eh!" was
      >bound to rear its head sooner or later!)
      >
      >But, yes someone had to go and mention that most contentious of issues,
      >safety! Everyone has different views on the subject and no one ever sees to
      >want to change their views even when presented with valid and viable proof
      >to counter the argument. So who will be the first to step boldly into this
      >void.
      >
      Oh, dear..

      as this looks like it could be a contentious issue, and I don't want to
      start a political row in a scene I am quite new in, interested parties,
      please Email me off list with info on safety regs in 1812 events. We of the
      3/95th really need some guidance here as to what's permitted, as some would
      like to load their Bakers, for example, from the horn (USING A BRASS
      MEASURE, FOLKS) occasionally at events. (We're still trying to work that one
      out; my gut feeling is, no, it won't be permitted at events.) Ramming and
      dropping wadding from cartridges down the barrel is not permitted in our
      unit, BTW. Does everybody in the 1812 scene require hammer stalls as well as
      flashguards?

      Roger
      3/95th
    • Sean
      Well, I see no one dared to take the bait on this issue of battlefield safety so on the morrow (I m done work and am going home) I will expound my beliefs and
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 3, 1998
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        Well, I see no one dared to take the bait on this issue of battlefield
        safety so on the morrow (I'm done work and am going home) I will expound my
        beliefs and see what people say to support or counter them, if they feel so
        inclined.

        Safety was a hot issue when the beast that some refer to as BNALHA was on
        the rampage and if things get ironed-out fast this time around there may
        not be such a fear of joining... at least among certain groups that I know.


        Cpl. Sean Hirst
        Royal Newfoundland Reg't, Lt. Coy
        *********************************
        945-0591
      • Sean
        Now safety... this is fairly long winded, so bear with me! (One star for each question asked by Jim. Two stars for exoanded Pretty simple, eh!) Ramrods: Ram
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 4, 1998
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          Now safety... this is fairly long winded, so bear with me!

          (One star for each question asked by Jim. Two stars for exoanded Pretty
          simple, eh!)


          Ramrods: Ram the first volley or not.
          Remove the ramrod from the musket before taking the field?
          Use ramrods for firing displays for the public with no
          opposing force opposite your line?


          * Sure, ram the first volley, just as long as the first volley isn't
          prepared in haste after contact has been made. We'll assume for this that
          the troops all load before they evn see on another.

          * Never remove the ramrod from the weapon. It can lost, stolen etc. In the
          pipes it's nice and safe.

          * Always use ramarods when doing a firing display. The public should be
          educated properly. (so many have pointed out that the Sharpe series is the
          anti-christ on miseducation so why should we join its ranks.)

          ** Some even advocate using a ram rod on the battlefield...Reasons
          - ramming forces all the powder to the touch hole, especially in a
          fouled weapon,
          thus decreasing misfires and increasing safety.
          - a ramrod not settling to where it "should" can indicate a
          misfired previous
          round (some people can't tell if their weapon went off or not???)

          (The big flaw with this reasoning is that we then must assume that everyone
          on the field is not a spaz that is going to fire their weapon with the rod
          in and I'm sure we all know a least one person that could fit the spaz
          category.)

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Wadding: Can Cavalry use paper wadding to hold charges in the barrel
          of pistols and slung carbines?
          Can Inf. use wadding on first volley for a louder bang to
          start the show?
          Can Inf. use wadding at any time?

          * Yes...

          * Yes, yes...

          * I guess you know where I'm going with this...
          We always use wadding because:
          - After a battle if a field needs to be checked for dropped rounds
          they are very easy
          to distinguish (being all blow to bits and what not)
          - The paper is only shot about 5 or 6 feet from the weapon. Not
          being particularly
          aerodynamic, paper is therefore not much of a threat.
          - Sometimes people say they can't see or hear their weapon fire in
          line. With all
          that pretty white confetti blown out of the end you can now
          generally tell
          - The only time we won't use a wad is when we are fighting in
          extremely dry woods
          or if there are dead on the ground within 10 metres of or front.
          People tend to
          get cranky about being set on fire.

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Bayonets Can a body of troops move with bayonets fixed?
          Can a body of troops start an assault with fixed bayonets
          and remove them before closing with the enemy?
          Can you break into a run for the last part of a charge with
          bayonets fixed and then recover before ending the
          charge?

          * Yes...

          * No, too much confusion. Will look stupid if you stop to remove what is
          suppose to be used
          to get your "point" across. Again have to assume people aren't going to be
          a giant spaz.

          * No! Refer to above spaz statement...

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Artillery How close can Inf. come to the muzzle of a cannon, "die"
          and lay under a firing gun?
          How can you safely "overrun" an artillery position?

          * This would be something an artillery man would have to discuss. I'm sure
          the safe range is a lot closer than we really think. I know the sfe range
          in front of a musket is about ten metres with a 120 grain charge being
          fired. It's loud (what???) but nothing hits you and it looks really cool.
          So, if some people are advocating no closer than 50 metres for a musket and
          it's be shown that 10 is actually safe then how wrong are we? Artillerist
          speak up! Also, I think the five minute rule is crap. If you want to blaze
          away, go ahead! It's not my powder!

          * I agree with Roger. They would have outflanked in the olden days too!

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Cavalry Can cavalry have drawn sabers when they attack Inf.?
          Can Inf. have fixed bayonets when cavalry attacks?
          How do Cavalry want the Inf. to react if a horse gets loose
          on the field?

          * I think cavalry are great and everytime I've worked with them it's been a
          whole heap o'fun, but I think they are the best ones to decide. Cavalry
          fellows tend to be very responsible for their actions and in control and
          the horse is always going to have that element of unknown to them. If they
          come to play they should dictate their rules of engagement to us and if
          some of the infantry don't like what they say then they don't have to come
          and play with the rest of the big boys.

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Infantry When we say "elevate" because troops are approaching, some
          people elevate to 45 degrees and it looks like they
          are duck shooting. Do we need to be this obvious?
          Can two sides actually close and mix it up?
          Does "mix it up" mean just mean moving amongst the other
          side, or does it mean limited hand-to hand.
          Does "hand to hand" mean fake butt strokes or grappling
          and rolling on the ground?

          * I don't think you need to elevate as long as you are outside of the 15
          metre range. Just like I said before as long as there is only paper and gun
          powder in the barrel nothing flies out past a few metres. We have tested
          this theory and are prepared to do a full production with notes, photos and
          stuff to support it. Of course at this range people have to take massive
          casualties so this means people are going to have to leave their kevlar
          coatees in the tent and die. It looks incredibly stupid to the crowd if we
          blaze away at this range and no one dies.

          * Closing and mixing it up is a touchy issue but if two units decide they
          are compatible and there has been a clear winner decided on before hand I
          see no problem here. The head commanders of both sides might like to know
          that this is going to happen as well. Right, Steve!

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Camps Can you use straw inside your tent for bedding (as concerns
          fire hazard)
          Can you use straw outside around your tent against rain and
          wind?

          * Straw can be used inside your tent. I know it's not period but it is a
          hell of a lot more accurate than a pumped up plastic mattress. When it
          comes to sleep and the inside of someones tent I think it's up to them as
          to what they want to do. If thye have anachcronism heaven inside the wals
          of their own little world they can just keep the flaps closed.

          * Straw outside the tent can be a bit of a fire hazard but in the many
          years that I've been in the hobby I've never seen a Guy Fawkes Day
          Demonstration.

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Loading from the horn - I think some folks think this means pouring
          powder directly from a horn into the muzzle like in some
          old Fess Parker movies from the 1950's. I must say that I
          have never had a hot flash up the barrel with a torn-open
          cartridge in 19 years of the hobby either.. Anyway, if you
          are pouring from a horn into a measure, THEN from the
          measure to the muzzle, I don't see a problem. When I do
          ECW,we pour our charges from an apostle into the barrel,
          and prime from a flask. (and with burning slowmatch in my
          hand!!!)

          * We don't use them and in 1812 they weren't that wide spread anyway but if
          your regiment uses them safely them what concern is it of anyone around
          you.

          ********************************************************************************
          *****

          Artillery I think as an infantry person, I would honor the safety
          regs the Artillery folks already use, especially ACW. They
          have the largest population of firable guns and more
          "booms per season" than any three other time periods
          combined. So I would think we should adopt their guidelines

          * Let's hear from the artillerists on what they say about their weapons. I
          would never listen to an artillerist telling me what to do with my musket
          (a weapon I know quite well) so I would never think myself so high and
          mighty as tell them how to run a gun.

          As to Jim's statement about speed of volleys...

          I think that the amount of volleys we are firing on the field is fine.
          There are some fellows out there that can't fire three rounds a minute even
          without ramming. But I completely agree that there should be more manoeuvre
          and march on the field than there is. In a Utopian reenactment society
          there wouldbe very little planning of battles beforehand and the General
          would have to act and counter-act their foes manoeuvres with those of his
          own. This assumes that if a fellow was caught in an inferior position (ie.
          flanked) he would either have to give ground or take some casulties. A
          perfect example of this happened at Fort Erie this year. The Brits put out
          an Light-Bob (Sorry, Jim) screen and the Yanks sent up a fast moving column
          to bust through. Under overwhelming pressure the screen pivotted back (THIS
          IS GOOD) but then as the Yanks moved through they were flanked by the light
          screen. The lights fired at close range but no one took casualties on the
          Yank side. The Yanks looked like superheroes, the Brits looked like
          incompitent boobs and the crowd looked confused and probably said, "They
          were so close. How come no one died? Golly gee, those guns must really be
          inaccurate!" (THIS IS BAD)

          In the end this hobby has to be looked at in this fashion... We are all
          grown men firing an explosive material at one another out of tools designed
          to kill. There is a certain element of danger involved in this and everyone
          has to assume some sort of responsibilty for their actions. One has to
          understand that the possibility of getting hurt by yourself or a buddy or
          some guy on the otherside is very real. If you figure you can sue at the
          drop of a hat then get out of this hobby and into something safer like coin
          collecting or bird watching. Hell, if somebody does hurt you Listen
          Hammurabi's an "Eye for an eye" rule and go nd kick his ass behind some
          officers marquee.



          Cpl. Sean Hirst
          Royal Newfoundland Reg't, Lt. Coy
          *********************************
          945-0591
        • NINETY3RD@aol.com
          In a message dated 04/11/1998 9:46:36 AM ... This is to me a real stickler and thorn in the side (puns intended). I happen to be trained in stage combat - a
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 4, 1998
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            In a message dated 04/11/1998 9:46:36 AM

            >Can two sides actually close and mix it up?
            > Does "mix it up" mean just mean moving amongst the other
            > side, or does it mean limited hand-to hand.
            > Does "hand to hand" mean fake butt strokes or grappling
            > and rolling on the ground?


            This is to me a real stickler and thorn in the side (puns intended).
            I happen to be trained in "stage combat" - a fancy theatrical term for not
            only "sword fighting but also a lot of other forms of physical "contact" or
            "violence" presented on a stage or in front of cameras. This is an art form
            more than a real martial art, but is designed to look real and (usually) to
            follow actual period forms of fighting with whatever weapon. Not to be
            confused with far too many SCA (and SCA-ers, just don't even start the
            arguement, ok?) rattan/duct-tape bash fests.

            I have often thought it might be a good idea (and hey - maybe a source of
            income to pay for reenactor doodads, or at least gas money...) to offer and
            teach some basic stage combat techniques at events or what not. I have been a
            Fight Director for a number of theatrical productions, a good many of which I
            had to not only choreograph the fights, but also had casts of novices who had
            never done any such thing before. In which cases I hand out my list of 4 rules
            for Stage Combat:
            "1.Safety
            2. Safety
            3. Safety
            4. All of the above."

            So, to briefly answer this issue of should there be any "mixing it up"? --
            If you are not trained -- NO.
            If you have not arranged it and in some form rehearsed it immediately prior
            with your "opponent" -- NO.

            Cheers!
            Benton
          • Stein
            Dear 1812 s, Apart from having as good a public liability insurance as can be obtained - and here in West Australia the only insurance company that was
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 4, 1998
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              Dear 1812's,

              Apart from having as good a public liability insurance as can be
              obtained - and here in West Australia the only insurance company that was
              prepared to offer a policy did so because the salesmen had actually
              participated in black powder reenactment with the RAN in 1988 - we have
              found that there are a couple of small things that ease over awkward spots
              on the field.

              It seems inevitable that someone is going to be shot. I mean -
              haven't we all done it at some time or other. You take aim at the enemy,
              pull the trigger, and get that solid thump in the shoulder that tells you
              there was a ball in the barrel rather than just a blank charge. At this
              point there are several things to do.

              1. Apply Dencorub to the shgoulder to prevent a bruise forming. Heparin
              also works but it spreads the bruise. Consider getting one of those plastic
              shoulder pads that the shotgunners use and sewing it into your uniform.

              2. Remove the shooting victim from the field using a period stretcher.
              Nothing looks farbier than a gurney bouncing over a poughed field. When in
              doubt - drag.

              3. Remove the outer clothing near the wound carefully.

              4. Prop up the victim carefully on a pile of newspapers.

              5. Remove the ball carefully with a pair of long-nose pliers. They can't
              do forensic tests on it if they can't find it. You may be able to pass
              the whole thing off as an insect bite that was ignored.

              6. If anyone asks who did it say Benton Jennings. And point vaguely back
              to where the troops are milling.

              7. Ease on back to the car and quietly drive away.


              Of course you will have to apologise to the organisers of the event
              for leaving early but you can do this the next day with a bread-and-butter
              letter and they seem to take it with a fair degree of philosophy. As a side
              note I see that Benton Jennings is now wanted in 2 states of Australia - I
              don't think the pictures in the post office do him justice, though.



              Cheers....Dick Stein

              ***********************************
              PLEASE NOTE!!!!!!

              WE HAVE CHANGED OUR EMAIL ADDRESS!!!
              Please send all correspondence to:

              stein@...

              Thankyou.
              ***********************************
            • Steve Hartwick
              On the topic of safety I will offer the following. Yes Sean. For those not familliar with my mug I will add to my previous intro that I have been graced
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 4, 1998
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                On the topic of safety I will offer the following.

                Yes Sean.

                For those not familliar with my mug I will add to my previous intro that I have been graced occasionally wit Command of the British line at several 1812 Events.

                Safety is formost in my thoughts as I anticipate being on the list of sued individuals if it all goes for a dump.

                At any opposed line tactical DO NOT USE A RAM ROD FOR ANY... NO NOT ANY RESON!!!! If you don't take it out it wont fly at me. I have yet to meet anyone in the hobby dim enough to forget one in the tube but it wont happen on my watch.

                Nothing should go down an infantrymans barrel. Not even the paper.

                Cavalry must wad as their pieces hang muzzle down but don't point it at us!

                If Bayonets are fixed extreme care and control must be used but we have used them safely on the field and can continue. Rain, Ground and spead of advance are the big thoughts for this one. If a unit commander does not feel an order is safe - stand your unit down and advise the field commander or safety officer.

                I am well known as being against hand to hand combat. If it appears on my field without my prior knowledge I will stop a tactical, and have, if I don't like the look of it. The problem is that once it happens there are uninformed people who think that it's ok and start charging in all over the place. Or my favorite down in a ravine full of trilliums (Ontario's Provincial and very protected flower) where the public cann't see anyway. But I digress.

                Don't go near the guns. 50 meters is still to close to a 6lber if it goes off pointed at you. Again if you want to over run one it has to be arranged in advance and both commanders must know.

                Basically common sense and safe handling of a loaded firearm will guide you well.

                Every site has it's own rules. If you play in their sand box the onus is on you the player to know the rules and use them.

                Steve
              • John Sek
                ... Unless some recent change I am not aware of, they are not protected flowers and have never been, only everyone thinks so. Still why trample them if it can
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 4, 1998
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                  Steve Hartwick wrote:

                  > the place. Or my favorite down in a ravine full of trilliums
                  > (Ontario's Provincial and very protected flower) where the public
                  > cann't see a

                  Unless some recent change I am not aware of, they are not protected
                  flowers and have never been, only everyone thinks so. Still why
                  trample them if it can be avoided.

                  John Sek

                  --
                  *********************************************************************

                  The Siege of Fort Erie - War of 1812 http://www.iaw.com/~jsek
                • NINETY3RD@aol.com
                  ... can t ... pass ... back ... As usual (if you subscribed to the newslist out of OZ you would know) Dr Dick is quite right. I for one already knew to carry
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 4, 1998
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                    In a message dated 04/11/1998 3:18:32 PM, stein wrote:

                    >From: stein@... (Stein)
                    >
                    >Dear 1812's,
                    >
                    > Apart from having as good a public liability insurance as can be
                    >obtained - and here in West Australia the only insurance company that was
                    >prepared to offer a policy did so because the salesmen had actually
                    >participated in black powder reenactment with the RAN in 1988 - we have
                    >found that there are a couple of small things that ease over awkward spots
                    >on the field.
                    >
                    > It seems inevitable that someone is going to be shot. I mean -
                    >haven't we all done it at some time or other. You take aim at the enemy,
                    >pull the trigger, and get that solid thump in the shoulder that tells you
                    >there was a ball in the barrel rather than just a blank charge. At this
                    >point there are several things to do.
                    >
                    >1. Apply Dencorub to the shgoulder to prevent a bruise forming. Heparin
                    >also works but it spreads the bruise. Consider getting one of those plastic
                    >shoulder pads that the shotgunners use and sewing it into your uniform.
                    >
                    >2. Remove the shooting victim from the field using a period stretcher.
                    >Nothing looks farbier than a gurney bouncing over a poughed field. When in
                    >doubt - drag.
                    >
                    >3. Remove the outer clothing near the wound carefully.
                    >
                    >4. Prop up the victim carefully on a pile of newspapers.
                    >
                    >5. Remove the ball carefully with a pair of long-nose pliers. They
                    can't
                    > do forensic tests on it if they can't find it. You may be able to
                    pass
                    > the whole thing off as an insect bite that was ignored.
                    >
                    >6. If anyone asks who did it say Benton Jennings. And point vaguely
                    back
                    > to where the troops are milling.
                    >
                    >7. Ease on back to the car and quietly drive away.
                    >
                    >
                    > Of course you will have to apologise to the organisers of the event
                    >for leaving early but you can do this the next day with a bread-and-butter
                    >letter and they seem to take it with a fair degree of philosophy. As a side
                    >note I see that Benton Jennings is now wanted in 2 states of Australia - I
                    >don't think the pictures in the post office do him justice, though.
                    >
                    > Cheers....Dick Stein

                    As usual (if you subscribed to the newslist out of OZ you would know) Dr Dick
                    is quite right. I for one already knew to carry the needle nose pliers in my
                    haversack.
                    As I am already confirmed as criminally insane, I am blamed for incidents I am
                    not even in attendance at. Take Gettysburg and that Frog with the pistol --
                    all my fault now of course, and here I was tucked away in California at the
                    time...
                    And Ned Kelley had nothing on me, blue!
                    ahahahahahahaha!!!
                    Benton
                  • Anne Woodley
                    I thought there might be a bit of (vague?) interest from this list for the chapters of the Harry Smith Autobiography(of the 95th) that cover the 1812 war - so
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 5, 1998
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                      I thought there might be a bit of (vague?) interest from this list for the
                      chapters of the Harry Smith Autobiography(of the 95th) that cover the 1812
                      war - so I have blithely skipped a few chapters of his life and just put up
                      chapters 19-23 - I think the America's campaign actually start from Chapter
                      20. you can link to the other chapters from each page but in case you
                      wanted here are the 5 urls.

                      http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/Harrysmith19.html

                      http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/Harrysmith20.html

                      http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/Harrysmith21.html

                      http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/Harrysmith22.html

                      http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/Harrysmith23.html


                      I would just like to point out that Benton Jennings (pointing vaguely
                      here) was in charge of the footnote accuracy, so there may be a few minor
                      glitches still there. If there is some remaining problems then contact me
                      (Benton will never get round to fixing it) and just note that the footnotes
                      are at the bottom of the page.

                      By the way - I've been really interested to here the discussion on the
                      muskets and guns. All accounts that I have read (which admittedly isn't as
                      wide as some of you) point to their huge inaccuracy. I think some of the
                      people who have discussed it later have talked about the fear factor
                      influencing aim, loading etc and also that the guns jammed with heat/dirt
                      etc. Even stocks swelling so they were unusable. But it is all second hand
                      knowledge to me - the most lethal weapon I have held in my hand is a tin
                      opener so it is fascinating to hear how they work, and the pros and cons of
                      using of them in different ways - its a lot nearer than some remote uniform
                      200 years ago.

                      Regards

                      Anne
                    • NINETY3RD@aol.com
                      ... What? What? What? I was? Am? Where? When? ;-)
                      Message 10 of 16 , Nov 5, 1998
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                        In a message dated 05/11/1998 12:17:08 AM, awoodley@... wrote:

                        >I would just like to point out that Benton Jennings (pointing vaguely
                        >here) was in charge of the footnote accuracy, so there may be a few minor
                        >glitches still there. If there is some remaining problems then contact me
                        >(Benton will never get round to fixing it) and just note that the footnotes
                        >are at the bottom of the page.


                        What? What? What?
                        I was? Am? Where? When?
                        ;-)
                      • IX Regt.
                        Excellent, thanks for the advice, the spelling of Benton s name is correct, can we give his address? Pioneer Peter IX Regt. (UK) ... -- IX Regt.
                        Message 11 of 16 , Nov 6, 1998
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                          Excellent, thanks for the advice, the spelling of Benton's name is
                          correct, can we give his address?

                          Pioneer Peter
                          IX Regt. (UK)
                          >From: stein@... (Stein)
                          >
                          >Dear 1812's,
                          >
                          > Apart from having as good a public liability insurance as can be
                          >obtained - and here in West Australia the only insurance company that was
                          >prepared to offer a policy did so because the salesmen had actually
                          >participated in black powder reenactment with the RAN in 1988 - we have
                          >found that there are a couple of small things that ease over awkward spots
                          >on the field.
                          >
                          > It seems inevitable that someone is going to be shot. I mean -
                          >haven't we all done it at some time or other. You take aim at the enemy,
                          >pull the trigger, and get that solid thump in the shoulder that tells you
                          >there was a ball in the barrel rather than just a blank charge. At this
                          >point there are several things to do.
                          >
                          >1. Apply Dencorub to the shgoulder to prevent a bruise forming. Heparin
                          >also works but it spreads the bruise. Consider getting one of those plastic
                          >shoulder pads that the shotgunners use and sewing it into your uniform.
                          >
                          >2. Remove the shooting victim from the field using a period stretcher.
                          >Nothing looks farbier than a gurney bouncing over a poughed field. When in
                          >doubt - drag.
                          >
                          >3. Remove the outer clothing near the wound carefully.
                          >
                          >4. Prop up the victim carefully on a pile of newspapers.
                          >
                          >5. Remove the ball carefully with a pair of long-nose pliers. They can't
                          > do forensic tests on it if they can't find it. You may be able to pass
                          > the whole thing off as an insect bite that was ignored.
                          >
                          >6. If anyone asks who did it say Benton Jennings. And point vaguely back
                          > to where the troops are milling.
                          >
                          >7. Ease on back to the car and quietly drive away.
                          >
                          >
                          > Of course you will have to apologise to the organisers of the event
                          >for leaving early but you can do this the next day with a bread-and-butter
                          >letter and they seem to take it with a fair degree of philosophy. As a side
                          >note I see that Benton Jennings is now wanted in 2 states of Australia - I
                          >don't think the pictures in the post office do him justice, though.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Cheers....Dick Stein
                          >
                          >***********************************
                          >PLEASE NOTE!!!!!!
                          >
                          >WE HAVE CHANGED OUR EMAIL ADDRESS!!!
                          >Please send all correspondence to:
                          >
                          >stein@...
                          >
                          >Thankyou.
                          >***********************************
                          >
                          >
                          >
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                          >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square
                          >miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square
                          >miles...

                          --
                          IX Regt.
                        • stein@xxxxxxx.xxx.xxxxxxxxx)
                          Dear Pioneer Peter, Yes, that is the way Benton spells his name. I believe he is somewhere in California becoming a movie star. While this may seem an
                          Message 12 of 16 , Nov 6, 1998
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                            Dear Pioneer Peter,

                            Yes, that is the way Benton spells his name. I believe he is
                            somewhere in California becoming a movie star. While this may seem an
                            ambitious hope for most of us, Benton probably will succeed. I wonder if
                            they still have the old casting couches in the directors' private offices?


                            Dr. Dick

                            ***********************************
                            PLEASE NOTE!!!!!!

                            WE HAVE CHANGED OUR EMAIL ADDRESS!!!
                            Please send all correspondence to:

                            stein@...

                            Thankyou.
                            ***********************************
                          • NINETY3RD@aol.com
                            ... ... ... back ... If needs be, I can send a crate of autographed 8x10 headshots to distribute to the amazed public, which will include an
                            Message 13 of 16 , Nov 7, 1998
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                              In a message dated 06/11/1998 11:18:47 AM, ixreg@... wrote:

                              >Excellent, thanks for the advice, the spelling of Benton's name is
                              >correct, can we give his address?
                              >
                              >Pioneer Peter
                              >IX Regt. (UK)
                              >>From: stein@... (Stein)
                              >>
                              >>Dear 1812's,
                              <snip>
                              >> It seems inevitable that someone is going to be shot. I mean -
                              >>haven't we all done it at some time or other. You take aim at the enemy,
                              >>pull the trigger, and get that solid thump in the shoulder that tells you
                              >>there was a ball in the barrel rather than just a blank charge. At this
                              >>point there are several things to do.
                              <snip>
                              >>6. If anyone asks who did it say Benton Jennings. And point vaguely
                              back
                              >> to where the troops are milling.
                              >>
                              >>7. Ease on back to the car and quietly drive away.
                              >>
                              >> Of course you will have to apologise to the organisers of the event
                              >>for leaving early but you can do this the next day with a bread-and-butter
                              >>letter and they seem to take it with a fair degree of philosophy. As a side
                              >>note I see that Benton Jennings is now wanted in 2 states of Australia - I
                              >>don't think the pictures in the post office do him justice, though.

                              If needs be, I can send a crate of autographed 8x10 headshots to distribute to
                              the amazed public, which will include an address and rates for joining my Fan
                              Club --- I'll become rich and famous one way or another.....
                              ;-)
                              Cheers!
                              Benton
                              P.S. Only give out the address of my publicist...L.A. is weird enough as it
                              is.
                            • chimera1@sympatico.ca
                              I have been talking about simple safety rules. How about something like this? Bayonets will not be fixed when in opposing situations. Ramrods will not be used
                              Message 14 of 16 , Apr 4, 2001
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                                I have been talking about simple safety rules. How about something
                                like this?

                                Bayonets will not be fixed when in opposing situations.

                                Ramrods will not be used in loading in opposing situations.

                                No objects of any kind can be thrown in opposing situations.

                                Opposing lines/units/individuals will not fire within 30 yards (or
                                whatever) of their opposition.

                                Opposing lines/units/individuals will not come closer than 5 yards
                                (or whatever) from their opposition.

                                Physical contact will not occur between individuals unless previously
                                ageed by the individuals.

                                Cartridge will be stored centrally by units between demos/battles and
                                not carried around by individuals.

                                Hey, there may be a few more, but doesn't this cover the basics?

                                Doug
                              • chimera1@sympatico.ca
                                Are there any site/event administrators on or monitoring this site? - and if so what might be your opinions? Doug
                                Message 15 of 16 , Apr 17, 2001
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                                  Are there any site/event administrators on or monitoring this site? -
                                  and if so what might be your opinions? Doug
                                • colsjtjones2000@yahoo.ca
                                  During one of the Stoney Creek battles, a front rank man in the unit immediately to my right was consistently misfiring. In frustration, he shoved himself
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jun 11, 2001
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                                    During one of the Stoney Creek battles, a front rank man in the unit
                                    immediately to my right was consistently misfiring. In frustration,
                                    he shoved himself back and physically shoved his rear rank file
                                    partner into the front. A pace and a half back, he went to work on
                                    his lock, with the muzzle hovering and almost touching the front rank
                                    man's neck. So intent was he, that I am sure he had no idea where
                                    his muzzle was. His work seemed to have no effect, so he soon died a
                                    dramatic death (perhaps overdue).

                                    Proper drill would have had him remain in position as he worked on
                                    his lock. If he had to remove himself to the rear rank, he should
                                    have remained in the locked up position, so that his muzzle was
                                    safely forward of the front rank.

                                    Doug
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