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which devices are these?

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  • rextoews
    Many decry hammer-stalls and flash guards as modern devices improper to the impression. Private ownership and use of firearms is in a precarious position.
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2005
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      Many decry hammer-stalls and flash guards as modern devices
      improper to the impression. Private ownership and use of firearms is
      in a precarious position. Explaining to bystanders the use of the
      half cock, hammer-stalls, flashguards, ramrods to check the barrel,
      the fact we purchase insurance, reinforces to the public the fact
      that we responsibly go beyond to teach, to educate and take the
      greatest measures to assure public safety and ourselves, especially
      with what many consider a primitive firearm. Your ulterior motive
      may be to preserve private ownership of firearms, and remember that
      there is as much opposition to realistic replicas. How many would
      still be in the hobby if we had to carry wooden sticks painted pink
      and in chorus shout "bang" on the firing line? A tenor I'm not, the
      report of my musket carries further.

      Firearms safety is not just a modern concern. Think of the fact that
      you have a half cock on your musket. If your concern is historical
      authenticity, Cuthbertson, instrumental in interpreting British
      regulations of the military in the latter part of the 1700's (about
      the time of the American Revolution), noted that, "On service,
      leather Hammer-stalls are undoubtedly an advantage to a Battalion,
      when loaded, and resting on their arms, as accidents may be
      prevented by having them fixed upon the hammers of the firelock."
      For those of you that may be modern thinking, the frizzen was
      actually called the hammer. What we currently call the hammer was
      called the cock. The hammer-stall was a frizzen cover. Also, when
      stealthy movement of a unit was done, it was not unusual to take the
      extra precaution of not loading the musket until the enemy were
      about to be engaged, for fear that an accidental discharge would
      reveal your movement.

      The famous English gunsmith, Henry Nock who opened a gunshop in
      London in 1772, appointed as gunsmith to King George, III in 1789
      (who incidently also invented the flintlock tinder starter),
      supplied guns equipped with flash guards. In the 1770's, they did
      not have sideburns.

      I don't know any blind reenactors on an infantry line, so I'll laud
      the extra safety, thank you.
    • BritcomHMP@aol.com
      In a message dated 02/02/2005 08:25:51 Central Standard Time, rextoews@yahoo.ca writes: Firearms safety is not just a modern concern. Think of the fact that
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2005
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        In a message dated 02/02/2005 08:25:51 Central Standard Time,
        rextoews@... writes:

        Firearms safety is not just a modern concern. Think of the fact that
        you have a half cock on your musket. If your concern is historical
        authenticity, Cuthbertson, instrumental in interpreting British
        regulations of the military in the latter part of the 1700's (about
        the time of the American Revolution), noted that, "On service,
        leather Hammer-stalls are undoubtedly an advantage to a Battalion,
        when loaded, and resting on their arms, as accidents may be
        prevented by having them fixed upon the hammers of the firelock."






        That said the only instances I can ever find of these articles being used at
        the time was in defective muskets that, of necesity, still had to see
        service. I strongly suspect that this is what he was refering to, not advocating
        the universal use of them. Also, even on the defective muskets there was no
        thought of sliping them on and off during the firing procedure in the idiotic
        manner adopted by the early rev war groups.

        I soon came to the conclusion that any musket that needs a hammerstall
        should be nowehere near a re-enactment field, and no re-enactor who needs a
        flashguard on his musket should be firing one. In those circumstances the weapon
        needs repair and the man needs training.

        Cheers

        Tim


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      • Colin
        I searched the archives for this and found no references. Maybe I DID A BAD SEARCH AND THIS HAS BEEN DISCUSSED BEFORE, but this is another side to safety vs.
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 2, 2005
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          I searched the archives for this and found no references. Maybe I DID A BAD
          SEARCH AND THIS HAS BEEN DISCUSSED BEFORE, but this is another
          side to safety vs. Authenticity.

          Elevating?!?!


          What is the opinion on this. I'm not totaly sure how I feel about this , but I have
          heard something similar to the title of this post.
          Something to the effect that "if someone is not sure about whats coming out of
          their musket they should be (read along now) "nowehere near a re-enactment
          field.""

          Though not totally sure I guess I do lean to the leveled musket side.


          I like the most of us here have been on the recieving side of a battalion volley.
          (the first time for me was at Ft George in '96. WOW!!! The Impressive British
          line let off a most Beautiful volley) And it was leveled not elevated!! It has
          gone through my mind that someone may have goofed and put something
          down there but.... What can you say. I have accepted that as a risk of the
          hobby. Maybe I'm nuts!?!? but I guess my overall opinion is that elevating
          muskets to look like a 21 gun salute is silly looking. ("No wonder no one
          goes down. They shoot over eachothers head!") and if some think they need
          to elevate, they should probably prepare for events by either drilling without
          ramers or anything else that could possible be shot from a musket and/or
          leave that stuff home!!!

          Anyone else?
          Colin Murphy
          USS Con 1812 MG
        • BritcomHMP@aol.com
          In a message dated 02/02/2005 10:58:18 Central Standard Time, usmarine1814@yahoo.com writes: if some think they need to elevate, they should probably prepare
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 2, 2005
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            In a message dated 02/02/2005 10:58:18 Central Standard Time,
            usmarine1814@... writes:

            if some think they need
            to elevate, they should probably prepare for events by either drilling
            without
            ramers or anything else that could possible be shot from a musket and/or
            leave that stuff home!!!





            Tht's something else that puzzels me. if one wants to prevent hiting someone
            I would think that elevating is the last thing to do, it will only make
            anything in the barrel fly further! A more sure way is by depressing the barrel
            (and it would be historicaly correct to have officers shouting "shoot low"),

            The exception of course would be over an area with casualties in front of
            the line.

            Cheers

            Tim


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