Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [WarOf1812] talking on the field

Expand Messages
  • Kevin Windsor
    I think what Mr Lozon is trying to say is that there are a lot of things happening on the field. If you are too busy yelling you killed Kenny...you b#stard
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 28, 2005
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I think what Mr Lozon is trying to say is that there are a lot of things
      happening on the field. If you are too busy yelling "you killed Kenny...you
      b#stard (I have heard it!) then you may not hear the "cavalry on the
      field...form square" and to paraphrase the late Sjt Maj those squirrels
      cross that field fast and if you are on the outside of the square good luck!
      I have also heard things like "Dolly Madison wears army boots" "King George
      wears a dress". I highly doubt any of this would be shouted out to taunt
      the enemy one last time. If we wanted to truly emulate the command corps of
      the time I am sure I could get the Drum Major to flog the next offender or a
      cuff from the Serjeant would do nicely.
      Today I was reading an account of Lundy's Lane where Winfield Scott's
      Brigade started cheering when they heard General Riall had been captured.
      This was quickly answered by several large guns shooting at them!!
      Personally I have been on both sides of the caution tape, and when I hear
      things like, "f#$% musket won't go off, I think the next shot I'm goin'down"
      or can you believe them? we've been shooting at them for five minutes and no
      one is dying!" or "Hey Kevin this one is for you!" (more things I have
      heard)

      Kevin
      89th


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "J-P Johnson" <jpjohnsn@...>

      > I'm not sure why you are tying this to safety. It has been my experience
      > in this hobby, meager as it is, that, by and large, the laughing and
      > joking pretty much ceases as battle is joined. The pre-show hi-jinks
      > are a sign of good esprit-de-corps and camaraderie and likely
      > historically accurate prior to a battle.
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.