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white belts

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  • howard
    Now that we know how they did in Afganistan. How would one whitten cross belts and not have it come off on our red coats??? HOWARD
    Message 1 of 6 , May 27, 2004
      Now that we know how they did in Afganistan.
      How would one whitten cross belts and not have it come off on our red
      coats???

      HOWARD
    • AdC Crown Forces
      howard wrote: How would one whitten cross belts and not have it come off on our red coats??? HOWARD I just did my white buff belt. A
      Message 2 of 6 , May 27, 2004
        "howard" <howardsimcoe@h...> wrote:

        How would one whitten cross belts and not have it come off on our
        red coats???



        HOWARD

        I just did my white buff belt.

        A little WOOLITE in a saucer with just a touch of water
        use a tooth brush and brush the dirt away

        Don't wet yhe belt too much , more suds


        Yrs,

        L2
      • colsjtjones2000
        Another suggestion, which I have used on my more than 20 years old belting. Wipe the dirt/marks off with a moistened rag. Apply a light coating of Kiwi white
        Message 3 of 6 , May 27, 2004
          Another suggestion, which I have used on my more than 20 years old
          belting. Wipe the dirt/marks off with a moistened rag. Apply a
          light coating of Kiwi white shoe polish. (I find Kiwi is not as
          thick as others on the market and at all costs you want to prevent a
          build up which cracks over the years.) When dry lightly brush with a
          suede brush. That also reduces build up. It does give a slight
          sheen, which I suppose the farbys would denigrate. But it does keep
          the rough polish from depositing itself on your tunic. I understand
          the original/historic pipeclay did tend to make a mess of
          tunics. Doug


          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "AdC Crown Forces" <lalozon@n...>
          wrote:
          > "howard" <howardsimcoe@h...> wrote:
          >
          > How would one whitten cross belts and not have it come off on our
          > red coats???
          >
          >
          >
          > HOWARD
          >
          > I just did my white buff belt.
          >
          > A little WOOLITE in a saucer with just a touch of water
          > use a tooth brush and brush the dirt away
          >
          > Don't wet yhe belt too much , more suds
          >
          >
          > Yrs,
          >
          > L2
        • BritcomHMP@aol.com
          ... It did come off on the coats! The soldiers knew exactly how much to put on to whiten the belts without it comming off too badly. As soon as they came off
          Message 4 of 6 , May 27, 2004
            In a message dated 5/27/04 4:21:20 PM, howardsimcoe@... writes:


            > Now that we know how they did in Afganistan.
            > How would one whitten cross belts and not have it come off on our red
            > coats???
            >
            > HOWARD
            >

            It did come off on the coats! The soldiers knew exactly how much to put on to
            whiten the belts without it comming off too badly. As soon as they came off
            parade they brushed their uniforms untill they were clean. Much of the time of
            a soldier in barracks was taken up in maintaining kit, there was no magic
            formula by which a soldier looked smart or 'soldierly' it was constant hard slog,
            nothing more. It is amazing how good a body can look if the whole of ones day
            is spent on drill and maintaining kit!

            Cheers

            Tim



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • cpl_kings_own
            ... a ... with a ... Actually the pipeclay was supposed to have a semi-glazed finish due to the material known as blue stone added to it (not sure what it is
            Message 5 of 6 , May 27, 2004
              --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "colsjtjones2000"
              <colsjtjones2000@y...> wrote:
              > Another suggestion, which I have used on my more than 20 years old
              > belting. Wipe the dirt/marks off with a moistened rag. Apply a
              > light coating of Kiwi white shoe polish. (I find Kiwi is not as
              > thick as others on the market and at all costs you want to prevent
              a
              > build up which cracks over the years.) When dry lightly brush
              with a
              > suede brush. That also reduces build up. It does give a slight
              > sheen, which I suppose the farbys would denigrate. (snip)

              Actually the pipeclay was supposed to have a semi-glazed finish due
              to the material known as "blue stone" added to it (not sure what it
              is known as today), as an attempt at making pipeclay water-
              resistant.

              A good substitute for pipeclay nowadays is outdoor semi-gloss white
              (or buff) latex paint. The only difference is the carrier, latex,
              which makes the coating permanent. Otherwise, this paint is
              basically liquid pipeclay.

              If the paint cracks, I just put some medium grade sandpaper on a
              wood block and go over the painted sides of crossbelts after having
              laid them out on a table. I get the paint sanded down so that it is
              at the same level of the cracks, and repaint, good as new.

              Or, additionally, one could use real pipeclay, if one can find it.

              Roger Fuller
            • dancingbobd@webtv.net
              List, Crazy Crow Trading Post has balls of pipe clay. They can be found by a Google search. Regards, Bob Dorian [Pv t. J. Thompson, Cap t Lewis Co. of
              Message 6 of 6 , May 31, 2004
                List,

                Crazy Crow Trading Post has balls of pipe clay. They can be found by a
                Google search.

                Regards,

                Bob Dorian
                [Pv't. J. Thompson, Cap't Lewis' Co. of Northwestern Discovery]
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