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Re: War Pension

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  • BritcomHMP@xxx.xxx
    In a message dated 8/2/99 6:57:14 PM Central Daylight Time, jsek@iaw.com writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 3, 1999
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      In a message dated 8/2/99 6:57:14 PM Central Daylight Time, jsek@...
      writes:

      << Many soldiers
      > signed up with the promise of receiving a land grant after the war,
      > but this leaves some interesting options. Aa soldier is killed on his
      > first day of duty. Would his wife, heirs receive his land grant, or
      > because he didn't finish the entire term of his enlistment, do they
      > get nothing?
      >
      > > I was wondering if you might know when the first War of 1812 Pension Law
      was
      > > passed that qualified Widows for a pension for their deceased husband's
      > > service in the War of 1812. I am researching a War of 1812 Veteran that
      died
      > > in service and wondered if his wife would have received any kind >>

      Dear John,

      I assume from the above reference to a land grant we are referring to US
      soldiers here?

      As far as British soldiers are concerned it would appear (from my brief
      scanning of the documents) that wives or nearest relatives would not receive
      any kind of pension though the were entitled to claim any prize money the
      soldier had due along with 'blood money'. This latter I came across in a
      collection of documents c1817 referring to a private killed at New Orleans
      (thanks Keith) but the regulations of 1806 do not seem to refer to this
      though I believe it refers to the value of his personal possessions or the
      amount paid for them by his comrades when they were sold off.

      Cheers

      Tim
    • John Sek
      Hi Tim: My reference to land grant was more as way of an example. I believe land grants were given on both sides of the border for various locations
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 3, 1999
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        Hi Tim:

        My reference to land grant was more as way of an example. I believe
        land grants were given on both sides of the border for various
        locations /enlistment groups as a form of getting the required
        strength. I am sure that other options may also have been employed
        and I would like to hear of these as well. The person who asked me
        this question, used the term War Pension referring to a government
        pension offered after the war to veterans and particularly to the
        widows of fallen soldiers.

        As you are suggesting, this may not have been done, which I tend to
        agree.

        How about it group, any other comments?




        *********************************************************************

        The Siege of Fort Erie - War of 1812 http://www.iaw.com/~jsek
      • BritcomHMP@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 8/3/99 8:44:28 PM Central Daylight Time, jsek@iaw.com writes:
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 3, 1999
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          In a message dated 8/3/99 8:44:28 PM Central Daylight Time, jsek@...
          writes:

          << As you are suggesting, this may not have been done, which I tend to
          agree.

          How about it group, any other comments? >>

          When it comes to pensions for the men I have the circulars for 1806 and the
          book of the new regulations introduced in 1829. Interestingly the fictional
          example used in the latter is the ubiquitous Thomas Atkins and his enlistment
          date is taken as 1806.

          Cheers

          Tim
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