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Why we fight (with apologies to Frank Capra)

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  • DM Carpenter
    I was talked into my first reenactment 10 years ago by an ROTC instructor at NCSU. I began doing WBTS. Before going to my first event, my impression of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 29, 1999
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      I was talked into my first reenactment 10 years ago by an ROTC
      instructor at NCSU.
      I began doing WBTS. Before going to my first event, my impression of
      reenactors was wannabe yahoos. Granted this during the 125, so that
      period was peaking, complete with the slip in quality that quantity can
      bring. I went to an event or two and I was hooked. I enjoyed reading,
      pseudo-research, and the unique camaraderie of the hobby. I enjoyed the
      interaction with the public. After two years, my small group began
      doing RevWar. I appreciated the different crowd at RevWar events, and I
      also appreciated the
      lack-of-event-sponsors-trying-to-soak-me-for-every-penny (vice WBTS).
      Funny, the registrations fees at WBTS events were supposedly to pay for
      the costs of the event (amenities *snort*, insurance...). After
      starting in RevWar, I wondered if the RevWar events got insurance and
      real amenities for free. *G*. A year or two after that, John Truelove
      talked my into trying 1812/Nap.
      His unit is the 21t RNBF, which served in Europe and in North America.

      Somewhere along the way, my motivation changed. Now, I go to events to
      see old friends in the hobby and meet new ones. Within the past three
      years, I starte doing WWII USN. We have formed a Historical
      Interpretive Detachment aboard USS North Carolina, and work with the HID
      aboard SS John Brown. With this period, I am allowed to collect
      original items, and interact with the men we portray. Having the chance
      to be instructed by the man who was gun captain on the very gun that I
      am now gun captain is a rare treat indeed. An example of this
      interaction is at an event last spring. I was told that I had been
      appointed gun captain on one of the guns in my mount. I quickly sewed
      my GC mark on my whites before chapel. After chapel, EVERY vet GC that
      was in attendance cornered me, and quizzed me if I knew what that mark
      was, and what my duties were. It was fine to se that these vets were
      proud of their past status, and their protection of same. It was more
      satisfying to have been duly examined and not found wanting. In the
      same vein, when I dyed one of my white covers blue, I had two comments
      from vets. THAT is a great moment.
      Great hobby
      Great comrades
      Great memories

      Dave
      Sobre John McLean's Coy, Cumberland Co. Loyal Militia
      Royal North Carolina Regiment
      21t Regt, Royal North British Fusiliers (Scots Fusiliers)
      Coy F 50th NCI
      HID, USS North Carolina, Gunnery
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