Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [WarOf1812] Re: U.S. Cheesebox canteen

Expand Messages
  • dancingbobd@webtv.net
    Hi Dave, The L & C Expedition traveled almost entirely by water in boats, floating in water. Canteens do not appear on the list of items purchased or drawn
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 5, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Dave,

      The L & C Expedition traveled almost entirely by water in boats,
      floating in water. Canteens do not appear on the list of items
      purchased or drawn from public stores.

      One journal entry by Lewis [I think] covered his experiment of taking 1
      gallon of water from the river and letting it settle over night and
      finding that there was a wine glass of sediment. Jefferson had read
      McKenzies journal when he crossed the continent in the late 1790's where
      there was a portage of some 200 yards. The expectation of drinking from
      the streams on which they were traveling may not have prompted the
      planning to include canteens.

      No fertilizer or pesticide washing off of farms & ranches to pollute the
      rivers and streams. Dipping water from the river would have been the
      norm. [In 1989 I went canoeing in the boundary waters of NE Minnesota
      for 5½ days and it is so clean the we drank by dipping from the lakes.
      No sediment, thankfully!] All that said, it still does not shed any
      light on what canteens if any were available.

      Regards,

      Bob Dorian
      [aka Pvt. John Thompson, Cpt. Lewis' Company of North Western Discovery]
    • ebclemson
      ... there was plenty of Missouri river water to be had?Why would they dig a well at Fort Osage on the Missouri river, if they coul= d just drink from the
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 6, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com,

        Hey Bob,
        Understand that the corp primarily traveled along rivers.

        Then......

        Why would they build Fort Bellefontaine at the site of a FOUNTAIN SPRING if=
        there was plenty of Missouri river water to be had?

        Why would they dig a well at Fort Osage on the Missouri river, if they coul=
        d just drink from the river?

        Why would they dig a well at Fort Dearborn with Lake Michigan only a stones=
        throw away and the Chicago river right next to the Sally port?

        Why did W. Scotts brigade in 1814 all have canteens, if they were primarily=
        in the area of Buffalo, Ft.Erie Chippewa and Lundy's Lane? You would think=
        that two of the Great Lakes and the Niagara river would be enough water? <g=
        >

        Yes, it is possible the Corp planned to drink enitrely from rivers, streams=
        ,etc. but highly unprobable. Did they actually think they would always be n=
        ext to a river?

        I agree that the so far we have found no documentation on canteens. However=
        , I would not want to suggest that means they did not have canteens or somew=
        ay to store and transport water.

        Why take food stuffs if the West was full of food for the taking?

        Ok, no fertilizer......well, actually there was....it was called manure. W=
        hen Buffalo crossed the streams etc they would had "naturally" left a deposi=
        t of manure. I can't remember if it was Bradbury or Sibley, but one of the=
        m mentioned about large amounts of dead buffalo floating down the Missouri. =
        Now that would be a tasty beverage, Missouri River water with just a dash of=
        rotting buffalo for flavor. mmmmmm, good.

        <g>

        Adieu,

        Cap'n Dave,

        1st Infy. & Missouri Rangers.

        dancingbobd@w... wrote:
        > Hi Dave,
        >
        > The L & C Expedition traveled almost entirely by water in boats,
        > floating in water. Canteens do not appear on the list of items
        > purchased or drawn from public stores.
        >
        > One journal entry by Lewis [I think] covered his experiment of taking 1
        > gallon of water from the river and letting it settle over night and
        > finding that there was a wine glass of sediment. Jefferson had read
        > McKenzies journal when he crossed the continent in the late 1790's where
        > there was a portage of some 200 yards. The expectation of drinking from
        > the streams on which they were traveling may not have prompted the
        > planning to include canteens.
        >
        > No fertilizer or pesticide washing off of farms & ranches to pollute the
        > rivers and streams. Dipping water from the river would have been the
        > norm. [In 1989 I went canoeing in the boundary waters of NE Minnesota
        > for 5½ days and it is so clean the we drank by dipping from the lakes.
        > No sediment, thankfully!] All that said, it still does not shed any
        > light on what canteens if any were available.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Bob Dorian
        > [aka Pvt. John Thompson, Cpt. Lewis' Company of North Western Discovery]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.