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Re: "Partisan" comments

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  • Tracy
    Kevin us spectators on the side lines sometimes boo the American forces and being a spectator we don t know if it an actual American or a cross dresser we boo
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 2, 2003
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      Kevin us spectators on the side lines sometimes boo the American
      forces and being a spectator we don't know if it an actual American
      or a "cross dresser we boo in a jokingly tone of voice.
      Tracy



      --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, Kevin & Allison Windsor
      <kevin.windsor@s...> wrote:
      > I have noticed that at events south of the border I (we) usually
      get booed going off or coming on the field, and at one event I was
      asked why a good American would want
      > to be a red coat. (he was surprised when I told him we were
      Canadians)
      > Do the American forces get this treatment when they come up here?
      (I know there are a couple of spectators on this list) Do Canadians
      who portray US forces get this? I
      > know we never have when we switch teams, but it could be because we
      are good looking!!
      >
      > Kevin
      > 89th
      >
      > hq93rd wrote:
      >
      > > What a novel concept!
      > > You mean I can now, and finally -- after too many years, look
      forward
      > > to attending events and not having snide comments and looks
      directed
      > > my way (and usually behind my back) simply because I (a born and
      bred
      > > USA-ian) wear a red uniform?
    • hm95thfoot
      ... American ... At War of 1812 events we have always, as American citizens celebrating the accomplishments and memories of those who fought on the side of the
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 3, 2003
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        --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Tracy" <tracyforsyth@h...> wrote:
        > Kevin us spectators on the side lines sometimes boo the American
        > forces and being a spectator we don't know if it an actual
        American
        > or a "cross dresser we boo in a jokingly tone of voice.
        > Tracy
        >


        At War of 1812 events we have always, as American citizens
        celebrating the accomplishments and memories of those who fought on
        the side of the Crown, been treated with the utmost courtesy, at
        least by the site staffs and visitors. The people at Ft. Niagara,
        Ft. Erie and Ft. George, as well as the NPS staff at Chalmette
        Battlefield stand out in my mind as being especially courteous and
        respectful.

        Every once in a while we encounter a somewhat misinformed visitor
        (rifle units tend to attract those....), whom we politely let ramble
        on, but most, just about all, really, were tickled pink that we,
        like all the other reenactors, had come to these places. When they
        learned where we were from, some were quite astounded that we had
        come so far, and were all the more appreciative as a result.

        On the Rev War side, if I may, it was especially delicious irony to
        be in French Quebec City and having les citoyens go absolutely mad
        in cheering us British redcoats a few years ago. Something I thought
        I'd never live to see. (Of course, they might have been cheering us
        because "we" saved them from the American invaders in 1775....)

        RWF
      • Larry Lozon
        From: Peter Catley The role of the Commentators is often significant. ________________ I have found, since doing the narration
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 3, 2003
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          From: "Peter Catley" <peter.catley@...>

          The role of the Commentators is often significant.

          ________________

          I have found, since doing the narration at a number of
          events that the commentator's remarks should be equal
          about both sides and remember where you are ......

          It is not nice to pee in the other guys sandbox!

          I also make sure that they understand in order to have a
          battle you need an enemy and some of the enemy are actually
          "YOUR GUYS" cross dressing.

          This usually deters the cat calls. Also with the march past at
          the end of the tactical, especially if I can help it, both sides
          receive good rounds of applause.

          Larry Lozon
        • HQ93rd@aol.com
          ... My dear Peter, Are you insinuating I do not have, nor wear a kilt? Tish tosh! I lead the Highland Brigade on the death marches of 1990 and 1995 through
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 6, 2003
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            In a message dated 2/11/2003 9:47:29 AM, peter.catley@... writes:


            > However in France one section of the British Army have been raised to
            > Sainthood and that is the Highlanders, but only those in kilts I'm afraid
            > Benton.
            >

            My dear Peter,
            Are you insinuating I do not have, nor wear a kilt?
            Tish tosh!
            I lead the Highland Brigade on the "death marches" of 1990 and 1995 through
            the ways and backways of Waterloo and Braine A'llude (sic) clad in kilt,
            sporran and kilt-hose. Being at the head of the column I heard first off the
            ecstatic cries of "Eccosais!!" from the locals, and watched the glasses of beer
            appear out of pubs and houses to be offered the lads. I was also present at Boulgne
            in '95, seeing more of the same.
            Now, as I follow regs and as an Highland officer wear trousers and boots in
            the field, does not mean I know nothing of kilts!

            Yours, most bombastically,
            B
            93rd SHRoFLHU
            THE Thin Red Line
            www.93rdhighlanders.com



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