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"yankee"

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  • James Yaworsky
    ... I ve heard that it is an Indian corruption of the French word for English - anglais . You have to hear the way it s pronounced in Last of the
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2003
      >From: Stalin15@...
      >
      >I've heard the word "Yankee" was a corruption of the Arwark Indian sound
      >for "English".
      > Anyone got a definte source on the etymology of that word?
      >
      >--Pat

      I've heard that it is an Indian corruption of the French word for "English"
      - "anglais". You have to hear the way it's pronounced in "Last of the
      Mohicans" - "anglais" becomes "yanglais" becomes 'yankee" etc...

      Jim Yaworsky
      41st

      P.S. I've never heard of the "Arwark" tribe. Whereabouts were their happy
      hunting grounds?

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    • Ray Hobbs
      The Arwark are/were a Central American tribe, and I believe they were some of the first to greet Columbus. That s a long way geographically and
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 1, 2003
        The Arwark are/were a Central American tribe, and I believe they were
        some of the first to greet Columbus. That's a long way geographically
        and chronologically, from their encounter with English.
        I like the Dutch etymology - from Jan Kees, a Flemish term of
        disparagement used for the Dutch. But where the trail leads after that
        is muddy. The term 'Yankee' is first seen in English documents in
        1683, which would fit the development of New Amsterdam and the Dutch
        merchants there.
        Ray Hobbs
        41st Regt.


        On Wednesday, October 1, 2003, at 10:57 AM, James Yaworsky wrote:

        >
        > >From: Stalin15@...
        > >
        > >I've heard the word "Yankee" was a corruption of the Arwark Indian
        > sound
        > >for "English".
        > >    Anyone got a definte source on the etymology of that word?
        > >
        > >--Pat
        >
        > I've heard that it is an Indian corruption of the French word for
        > "English"
        > - "anglais".  You have to hear the way it's pronounced in "Last of the
        > Mohicans" - "anglais" becomes "yanglais" becomes 'yankee" etc...
        >
        > Jim Yaworsky
        > 41st
        >
        > P.S. I've never heard of the "Arwark" tribe.  Whereabouts were their
        > happy
        > hunting grounds?
        >
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      • dancingbobd@webtv.net
        Hi All, The 1828 Websters defines YANKEE, n. A corrupt pronunciation of the word English by the native Indians of America. The Flemish attribution sound like
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 2003
          Hi All,

          The 1828 Websters defines YANKEE, n. A corrupt pronunciation of the
          word English by the native Indians of America.

          The Flemish attribution sound like a lot more fun.

          Bob
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