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flashguards

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  • Larry Lozon
    Andrew Bateman wrote: They may not strictly enforce it... but it s on the books. Sgt. Wattie wrote: Yeah, but so s the jaywalking bylaw and the 100 km/hr speed
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 1, 2003
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      Andrew Bateman wrote:

      They may not strictly enforce it... but it's on the books.

      Sgt. Wattie wrote:

      Yeah, but so's the jaywalking bylaw and the 100 km/hr speed limit ...
      A law ... a regulation, honoured more in the breach than the observance is
      no law at all.

      ---------------

      True Story..........

      A highland unit, bout 20 guys show up at a Rev event at a USA National
      Parks site. Sat morning they check muskets, the Highland unit was denied
      access to all firing due to no flash guards and hammerstalls.

      I would hate to have that happen at Ft. George or Erie ........
      as it is on their rules, printed and handed out to all who attend and has
      been for years .

      PS: They do issue tickets for jaywalking and driving over the speed limit.

      ............ a thot!
    • Gord_1812
      ... National ... denied ... and has ... Yes Rev war events seem to really push the flash guard and hammer stalls. But like some have said. That s what they
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 1, 2003
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        >
        > True Story..........
        >
        > A highland unit, bout 20 guys show up at a Rev event at a USA
        National
        > Parks site. Sat morning they check muskets, the Highland unit was
        denied
        > access to all firing due to no flash guards and hammerstalls.
        >
        > I would hate to have that happen at Ft. George or Erie ........
        > as it is on their rules, printed and handed out to all who attend
        and has
        > been for years .
        Yes Rev war events seem to really push the flash guard and hammer
        stalls. But like some have said. "That's what they did." There are
        some reports of the military trying out flash guards but it didn't
        catch on. in The 1800's so why does the rev war crowd put them?
        And is there actually documentation on hammer stalls?

        Gord
      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        In a message dated 8/1/2003 11:31:36 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Yes of course they do, they invented them to try to make using a musket safe for people who
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 2, 2003
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          In a message dated 8/1/2003 11:31:36 PM Central Daylight Time,
          gord_1812@... writes:


          > Yes Rev war events seem to really push the flash guard and hammer
          > stalls.

          Yes of course they do, they invented them to try to make using a musket safe
          for people who were either scared of the weapon or to lazy to get it right.


          But like some have said. "That's what they did." There are

          > some reports of the military trying out flash guards but it didn't
          > catch on. in The 1800's so why does the rev war crowd put them?
          > And is there actually documentation on hammer stalls?
          >
          >

          No, it is not what they did. There are limited reports of such devices being
          used on unserviceable weapon that could not be replaced. Flashguards on ones
          where the touch hole had become over enlarged and hammerstalls where the half
          cock was not operating properly.

          There were some experiments with the 'self priming' lock that the Prussians
          had developed but of course the flashguard was cast integral with the lock. As
          you rightly say they were never introduced into service.

          They are only in use today because the Rev War people introduced them for
          their bicentennial!

          Cheers

          Tim


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Webb
          Hello List, While flashguards are a highly debated bit of safety equipment, and I know of two people who have been hit by flying flashguards, they are less
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 3, 2003
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            Hello List,
            While flashguards are a highly debated bit of safety equipment, and I know
            of two people who have been hit by flying flashguards, they are less
            intrusive than more conventional eye protection.
            It will never happen you say? I just learned of a historic site where
            the soldiers now wear construction goggles when they fire muskets.
            Increasingly labour laws in Canada are being very strictly interpreted,
            and some historic site managers are being told that not only could they get
            fired and be sued after an accident, but that they could also end up in
            jail if they do not demonstrate "due diligence" under the law. Insurance
            companies are less interested in taking risks these days. At Fort George,
            we used to be able to sign up the Fire Department as volunteers to fire off
            Canada Day fireworks when the Town's insurance company refused to cover the
            activity, but our policy will no longer cover this. It still covers
            participants at our events, but this may not last. Insurance companies,
            historic site safety committees, and nervous managers may well dictate
            safety equipment in the future.
            --Dave Webb At 09:42 AM 02/08/2003 -0400, you wrote:
            >In a message dated 8/1/2003 11:31:36 PM Central Daylight Time,
            >gord_1812@... writes:
            >
            >
            > > Yes Rev war events seem to really push the flash guard and hammer
            > > stalls.
            >
            >Yes of course they do, they invented them to try to make using a musket safe
            >for people who were either scared of the weapon or to lazy to get it right.
            >
            >
            > But like some have said. "That's what they did." There are
            >
            > > some reports of the military trying out flash guards but it didn't
            > > catch on. in The 1800's so why does the rev war crowd put them?
            > > And is there actually documentation on hammer stalls?
            > >
            > >
            >
            >No, it is not what they did. There are limited reports of such devices being
            >used on unserviceable weapon that could not be replaced. Flashguards on ones
            >where the touch hole had become over enlarged and hammerstalls where the half
            >cock was not operating properly.
            >
            >There were some experiments with the 'self priming' lock that the Prussians
            >had developed but of course the flashguard was cast integral with the
            >lock. As
            >you rightly say they were never introduced into service.
            >
            >They are only in use today because the Rev War people introduced them for
            >their bicentennial!
            >
            >Cheers
            >
            >Tim
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
            >square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS
            >of square miles...
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
          • Mark Dickerson
            Now before a big argument begins, let me state that I am NOT looking to start a debate on flashguards. I am neither endorsing or discrediting flashguards. I
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 9, 2009
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              Now before a big argument begins, let me state that I am NOT looking to
              start a debate on flashguards. I am neither endorsing or discrediting
              flashguards. I am NOT attempting to incite a civil war. I am only posting
              this as an interesting tidbit of information. Do with it as you wish. We
              have all seen the various positive and negative arguments on both sides of
              the issue about flashguards, tilting muskets and safety and I don't think we
              need to revisit the issue. Please do NOT let this turn into another flurry
              of hundreds of emails about flashguards.



              My only reason for posting this is to show that some problems we have today,
              existed back then. History does indeed repeat itself.





              Taken from THE REGIMENTAL COMPANION, by Charles James, 7th edition, Vol 1,
              London, 1811. Page XXVII I do not believe that this book had official
              endorsement.



              ".naturally leads me to recommend, that a side-guard made of good tempered
              steel or iron should be attached to the outside of the pans of our musquets.
              Every musquet in the Prussian service is so fenced. The advantage is
              two-fold. First, it would protect the pan from the insinuation of the moist
              vapour through the side crevice; and secondly, the crude or coarse grains of
              powder, which invariable fly into the face of every right hand man, from the
              discharge of the musquet on his left, would be repelled by it."



              Mark D





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            • BritcomHMP@aol.com
              Fascinating reference Mark and the first time I have seen anything in English to do with flashguards in British service. As you say this publication did not
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 9, 2009
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                Fascinating reference Mark and the first time I have seen anything in
                English to do with flashguards in British service.

                As you say this publication did not have official endorsement. Many of
                these works pop up and they aimed towards the weekend warriors of the militia
                rather than the regulars who had the official manuals to work from.

                Personaly I don't think that anyone will ever convince me that a device
                which prevents the correct operation of a weapon is a 'safety device' but as
                you say this is most interesting, and period!

                Cheers

                Tim


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