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Re: Brit line

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  • giiir
    ... At the risk of flogging a dead horse, let me just say: FLASH GUARDS AND HAMMER STALLS? Fred Fishell
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 30, 2003
      > Because it's not how they did it.
      > Craig

      At the risk of flogging a dead horse, let me just say: FLASH GUARDS
      AND HAMMER STALLS?
      Fred Fishell
    • Sgt. Wattie
      A few points. If the elaborate falling in/trooping the colours routine is for the benefit of the public, why don t we (or site staff) have someone explaining
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 31, 2003
        A few points.
        If the elaborate falling in/trooping the colours routine is for the
        benefit of the public, why don't we (or site staff) have someone
        explaining it all to whomever is watching us do our thing? What I'm
        suggesting Craig is a compromise between strict authenticity (insofar
        as that's possible) and the reality that re-enactors are much older
        on average and much less fit on average than your run-of-the-mill
        1812 infantryman and are not subject to flogging for fidgeting while
        at attention. Much as the drum major wishes we were ... a compromise,
        I might add, like that which justifies flashguards to name but one
        example.
        If you seriously believe that we only have to gear up 10-15 minutes
        before a battle, I invite you to time the falling-in process from the
        first sgt's call to the march on of the C.O., then add another 15
        minutes for kitting up and collecting powder. Not to mention the
        usual half hour of "hurry up and wait" once we get on the field. It
        ain't no 15 minutes ...
        Point taken about sweaty doeskin, but as for the officers standing
        about in the shade (I admit to kidding about the lemonade) it's
        happened at almost every bn event I've been to this year. Not every
        officer and not all the time, but my lads notice it EVERY single time.
        Promenading is a specific drill activity, which was to my knowledge
        formalized in the drill books by Victorian times at least, it is not
        standing about in a gaggle chatting. I have yet to see it happen at
        an event, although possibly I just didn't notice on account of
        getting shouted at by the Sgt-Maj at the time. It's a slow march in
        pairs up and down the side of the parade square with swords sheathed,
        or at least it was in the Victorian drill. If there's an 1812
        equivalent I'd love to see it, but my guess would be that the
        Victorian promenade drill was a formalization of something that was
        being done informally much earlier. Even if it isn't strictly period,
        it looks very cool when done right.
        My suggestions about bn drill (and they were just suggestions) were
        how to spend the hour or two of drill time we currently do, ie: an
        hour of individual company drill by the unit sgts (supervised by the
        sgt-maj) during which time the officers get their instruction from
        the colonel (voice training for eg would be useful for many) and/or
        supervise the individual unit drills. For the second hour, the
        battalion can do a dry run, or dress rehearsal of the coming battle.
        And for the record, I have no objection to wearing wool in the hot
        sun ... I'd just like there to be a good reason for it.
        Chris W.
      • Gord_1812
        ... were ... the ... AN HOUR OR TWO! Are you off your nut! You know how far I d have to drive for a ice run to avoid a BD that lasted that long! It would be
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 31, 2003
          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Sgt. Wattie" <cwattie@n...> wrote:
          > A few points.
          > > My suggestions about bn drill (and they were just suggestions)
          were
          > how to spend the hour or two of drill time we currently do, ie: an
          > hour of individual company drill by the unit sgts (supervised by
          the
          > sgt-maj) during which time the officers get their instruction from
          > the colonel (voice training for eg would be useful for many) and/or
          > supervise the individual unit drills. For the second hour, the
          > battalion can do a dry run, or dress rehearsal of the coming battle.
          > And for the record, I have no objection to wearing wool in the hot
          > sun ... I'd just like there to be a good reason for it.
          > Chris W.

          AN HOUR OR TWO! Are you off your nut! You know how far I'd have to
          drive for a ice run to avoid a BD that lasted that long! It would be
          cool water by the time I got back to camp!

          Gord
        • Craig Williams
          ... Fred, This is different. In fact, more accurately non-sequitor. The core of this issue is safety as perceived by certain historic sites. Note that the
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 5, 2003
            on 7/31/03 2:22 AM, giiir at giiir@... wrote:

            >> Because it's not how they did it.
            >> Craig
            >
            > At the risk of flogging a dead horse, let me just say: FLASH GUARDS
            > AND HAMMER STALLS?
            > Fred Fishell

            Fred,


            This is different. In fact, more accurately non-sequitor.
            The core of this issue is safety as perceived by certain historic sites.
            Note that the Artillery also are held to the strictest time guidelines for
            the reason of safety as well. We never go into battle with bayonets fixed,
            we don't close with the enemy, we aim above or below or away from the
            opposed line.

            Craig
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