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Fw: Now THIS "shit" is funny

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  • mike dollinger
    ... From: BrettDSawyer@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 8:14 AM To: MSawyer747@aol.com; Yordana7@aol.com; Jamesawyer@aol.com; MarcSawyer@aol.com;
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: BrettDSawyer@...
      Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 8:14 AM
      To: MSawyer747@...; Yordana7@...; Jamesawyer@...; MarcSawyer@...; medwards@...; RyanASawye@...; Swav843@...; mwid@...; smokingiron@...; danervin@...; Shirley_Klessig@...; revman_us@...; Icp0912@...; mrogers@...; rahadley@...
      Subject: Now THIS "shit" is funny



      >Exciting Historical information you need to know about shipping Manure: In
      >the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship. It
      >was also before commercial fertilizer's invention, so large shipments of
      >manure were common. It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a
      >lot
      >less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, it not only became
      >heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a by-product
      >is methane gas. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see
      >what could (and did) happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the
      >first time someone came below at night with a lantern, BOOOOM!
      >Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined
      >just what was happening. After that, the bundles of manure were always
      >stamped with the term "Ship High In Transit" on them which meant for the
      >sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that
      >came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the
      >production of
      >methane. Thus evolved the term "S.H.I.T," which has come down through the
      >centuries and is in use to this very day.
      >You probably did not know the true history of this word.
      >Neither did I. I always thought it was a golf term.Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John-Paul Johnson
      ummmm... no. There are so many things wrong with this that that s all I can say: no. J-P Johnson
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
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        ummmm... no.

        There are so many things wrong with this that that's all I can say: no.

        J-P Johnson

        > Subject: [WarOf1812] Fw: Now THIS "shit" is funny
        >
        >
        > >Exciting Historical information you need to know about shipping Manure: In
        > >the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship. It
        > >was also before commercial fertilizer's invention, so large shipments of
        > >manure were common. It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a
        > >lot
        > >less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, it not only became
        > >heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a by-product
        > >is methane gas. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see
        > >what could (and did) happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the
        > >first time someone came below at night with a lantern, BOOOOM!
        > >Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined
        > >just what was happening. After that, the bundles of manure were always
        > >stamped with the term "Ship High In Transit" on them which meant for the
        > >sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that
        > >came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the
        > >production of
        > >methane. Thus evolved the term "S.H.I.T," which has come down through the
        > >centuries and is in use to this very day.
        > >You probably did not know the true history of this word.
        > >Neither did I. I always thought it was a golf term.Get more from the Web
      • klamar93rd <klamar@hotmail.com>
        Comments of this etymology from an urban legends site:   Well, clever as that all is, etymologists everywhere must be holding their noses right about now.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
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          Comments of this etymology from an urban legends site:

           "Well, clever as that all is, etymologists everywhere must be
          holding their noses right about now. According to my dictionary,
          the word "shit" is much older than the 1800s, appearing in its
          earliest form — before 1,000 A.D. — as the Old English verb
          scitan. That's confirmed by lexicographer Hugh Rawson in his
          bawdily informative book, "Wicked Words" (New York: Crown,
          1989), where it is further noted that the expletive is a distant
          relative of words like science, schedule and shield. They all
          derive from the Indo-European root skei-, meaning "to cut" or "to
          split."  For most of its history "shit" was spelled "shite" (and
          sometimes still is, euphemistically), but the modern spelling of
          the word can be found in texts dating as far back as the
          mid-1700s. It most certainly did not originate as an acronym. "

          Very few words are actually derived from acronyms - like Radar
          and Scuba - and almost all of these were created within the last
          75 years...

          Kendall Lamar
        • abateman
          ... From: ... Hey! You re no fun! Don t you know you re just supposed to pass this stuff along to everyone in your address book without
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <klamar@...>


            >Comments of this etymology from an urban legends site:

            Hey! You're no fun! Don't you know you're just supposed to pass this stuff
            along to everyone in your address book without checking it out???

            >Very few words are actually derived from acronyms - like Radar
            >and Scuba - and almost all of these were created within the last
            >75 years...

            Say it ain't so! You mean all those stories I've heard about "port out,
            starboard home", "fornication under consent of the King" and "unlawful
            carnal knowledge" aren't reliable?? ;-)

            Andrew Bateman, 41st Foot
          • petemonahan@aol.com
            shit from the Old English scite (dung, excrement) and the Old Middle German schitte (excrement/diaorhea ) , or so says the Oxford English dictionary.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
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              "shit" from the Old English "scite" (dung, excrement) and the Old Middle
              German "schitte" (excrement/diaorhea ) , or so says the Oxford English
              dictionary. Truth is not only not stranger than fiction, its nowhere near as
              interesting sometimes!

              Now "Tommy", for British soldier, comes, I believe from an earlysample/model
              "Soldiers (Pay) Book, which was apparently made out in the name of "Thomas
              Atkins" of the " th"
              Regiment by, legend has it, no less august hand than that of Old Nosey,
              Arthur Wellesley hisself. Urban legend or history, guys?


              Peter Monahan
              petemonahan@...
              705-435-0


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • BritcomHMP@aol.com
              In a message dated 1/30/2003 5:28:07 PM Central Standard Time, ... Though I believe the usage pre dates, it I have a book of sample pension forms, etc., filled
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
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                In a message dated 1/30/2003 5:28:07 PM Central Standard Time,
                petemonahan@... writes:


                > Now "Tommy", for British soldier, comes, I believe from an earlysample/model
                > "Soldiers (Pay) Book, which was apparently made out in the name of "Thomas
                > Atkins" of the " th"
                > Regiment by, legend has it, no less august hand than that of Old Nosey,
                > Arthur Wellesley hisself. Urban legend or history, guys?
                >
                >
                >

                Though I believe the usage pre dates, it I have a book of sample pension
                forms, etc., filled in for Sergt. Thomas Atkins 30th Foot, enlisted 15th July
                1802, underage drummer till 24th January 1807. Transferred 92nd foot
                discharged 25th October 1813.
                Re-enlisted 43rd foot 4th May 1815. Deserted 11th July 1821, Rejoined 6th
                June 1822, retires 31st December 1828 and had the service which he had lost
                for desertion restored to him.

                Cheers

                Tim


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