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Tim Horton's coffee at the War of 1812

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  • marilynmarylinus@aol.com
    In a message dated 12/31/2002 8:04:26 AM Central Standard Time, ... I think Tim Horton s was the official coffee provider to the militia in Canada. The
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 31, 2002
      In a message dated 12/31/2002 8:04:26 AM Central Standard Time,
      WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com writes:


      > Message: 9
      > Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2002 05:40:40 -0000
      > From: "Tracy <tracyforsyth@...>" <tracyforsyth@...>
      > Subject: Straw and Hay bales
      >

      > cups in the hands of re
      > enactors.
      > Tracy
      >

      I think Tim Horton's was the official coffee provider to the militia in
      Canada. The British regulars brought their own Lipton tea bags. ;-)

      Seriously, although re-enactors have to eat and sleep and keep up with modern
      times, including modern sanitation (and, although I'm not a re-enactor, I've
      wandered about in my Empire style dress munching a McD's hamburger), I
      endorse Tracy's 'heads up'.

      You're living the life of soldiers and camp followers of 1812. You know more
      about those conditions than I do, from research and 'on the spot' experience.
      I'm here to learn from you at second hand. Sometimes it seems at a very
      distant second hand. Re-enactors seem very stand-offish about people like
      myself touring your camps. I for one hate butting in on your privacy but you
      are 'on show" and I am interested in what you do and how it's done -
      particularly the domestic side.

      The fast food and the wrappings do detract from the authenticity of your
      portrayals. So do the garbage bags and the portable latrines, but the site
      admin has to keep within the laws.

      Since some give and take between centuries happens, and since people have
      paid to see you do your stuff, may I ask that a few people in your units take
      on an extra assignment? Guide us through the encampment and explain what
      people are doing. Give demos if you can. How would the meals be cooked in
      the field, the socks darned, the wounded treated [I've yet to see surgery
      performed at Fort York], the children cared for [assuming there were children
      about], the discipline conducted? That way you won't have unregulated
      wandering and prying about the tents. Maybe you could have a section of it
      'in bounds', and its residents and furnishings as authentic as the laws and
      your research allows. Another section can be 'out of bounds' [you may need
      to set up pickets]. That's where the Tim Horton cups and the rest of the
      21st century goes, and where you can go to be 'off duty.'

      This popped into my head. A cloudburst ruined one of the events at Fort York
      last year. I assume that, during thunderstorms in 1812, the soldiers would
      remain in barracks [except for the sentries]. How did the sentries cope? Also
      how did the men in the tents contend with difficulties, when their camp
      became a swamp. How do you cope, historically, when you can't get a fire
      going and your canvas leaks and your straw is soaking wet?

      Marilyn P.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • PEGGY MATHEWS
      Kind of surprised to hear that. I only get east once or twice a year, plus the midwestern events, but my units tend to pride themselves on accessibility to
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 31, 2002
        Kind of surprised to hear that. I only get "east" once or twice a year,
        plus the midwestern events, but my units tend to pride themselves on
        accessibility to the public. We like to talk to people about what we're
        doing or portraying. Especially since it my case it's often a tad out of
        the ordinary. Might be a period thing. In the French and Indian War events
        I go to, and particularly my unit, we go out of our way to involve the
        public with a dialog. While we do roll our eyes with not another question
        of, "do you really sleep here?", but otherwise we like to talk. One of the
        things that has kept me out of some periods is roped off camp areas. Like
        you say, we are on display and IMHO should be prepared to interact with the
        public.

        Best to all in the coming year. May the wars only be fought as reenactments
        and on tabletops.

        Michael


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <marilynmarylinus@...>
        To: <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, December 31, 2002 10:15 AM
        Subject: [WarOf1812] Tim Horton's coffee at the War of 1812


        > In a message dated 12/31/2002 8:04:26 AM Central Standard Time,
        > WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com writes:
        >
        >
        (snip)
        Sometimes it seems at a very
        > distant second hand. Re-enactors seem very stand-offish about people like
        > myself touring your camps. (snip)
      • Tracy <tracyforsyth@hotmail.com>
        I agree with Marilyn here, our family attends three re enactments a year Stoney Creek,Fort George and Fort Erie and alot of the times we enter the camp where
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 31, 2002
          I agree with Marilyn here, our family attends three re enactments a
          year Stoney Creek,Fort George and Fort Erie and alot of the times we
          enter the camp where we are told we are to ask questions and learn
          about the period. We often feel we are not welcome or we are
          intruding.
          We don't lead exciting lives and the re enactments are the "high"
          point of our summers and looked forward to all winter! We have met
          alot of re enactors from this list and we do seek them out when we
          are at a location but most of the time when we go to the camp it
          sometimes seems as the re enactors are glad to see their buddies that
          they haven't seen since the last re enactment and we wonder around
          wondering if we are in an out of bounds area.

          I am not writing this to hurt any one's feelings I am just relating
          how we feel as a family attending some of the re enactments.
          Tracy Royal Observer
          Marilyn wrote
          Re-enactors seem very stand-offish about people like
          > myself touring your camps. I for one hate butting in on your
          privacy but you
          > are 'on show" and I am interested in what you do and how it's done -

          > particularly the domestic side.
          >
          > The fast food and the wrappings do detract from the authenticity of
          your
          > portrayals. So do the garbage bags and the portable latrines, but
          the site
          > admin has to keep within the laws.
          >
          > Since some give and take between centuries happens, and since
          people have
          > paid to see you do your stuff, may I ask that a few people in your
          units take
          > on an extra assignment? Guide us through the encampment and explain
          what
          > people are doing. Give demos if you can. How would the meals be
          cooked in
          > the field, the socks darned, the wounded treated [I've yet to see
          surgery
          > performed at Fort York], the children cared for [assuming there
          were children
          > about], the discipline conducted? That way you won't have
          unregulated
          > wandering and prying about the tents. Maybe you could have a
          section of it
          > 'in bounds', and its residents and furnishings as authentic as the
          laws and
          > your research allows. Another section can be 'out of bounds' [you
          may need
          > to set up pickets]. That's where the Tim Horton cups and the rest
          of the
          > 21st century goes, and where you can go to be 'off duty.'
          >
          camp
        • Dave Hill <dave.bev@rogers.com>
          Tracy and others, Unlike Terry, I am one of those re-enactors who re-enact for the public. Terry and I have known each other for many years and have agreed to
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 1, 2003
            Tracy and others,
            Unlike Terry, I am one of those re-enactors who re-enact for the
            public. Terry and I have known each other for many years and have
            agreed to disagree on this point.
            The constitution of our re-enactment society (MRSC) states that one
            of our aims is the education of the public about the War 0f 1812
            specifically and the time period in general. We strive to keep our
            uniforms, drill, camp, etc. as close to accurate as
            possible. We never turn the public away from our camp and our
            members spend hours talking to the public.
            That being said, I don't want to live in 1812. If this were
            1812, I would have died in 1770 from appendicitis. We encourage our
            members to not use or to hide non-period items. BUT our members are
            volunteers who do this for fun and at some expense to themselves,
            and I am not willing to demand that a member spend money
            for an 1812 stroller after they have spent several thousand on a
            musket, uniform, period tent, etc.
            One gradually gets better and better at the impression but it takes
            time. Personally, I prefer our camp coffee to Tim's, but if
            someone makes a morning coffee run, I drink Tim's and dispose of
            the cup before the camp is open to the public. Once the camp is
            closed to the public, I make myself as comfortable as possible.

            Dave.
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