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Louisiana Blues

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  • Kevin Windsor
    Does anyone out there have any info on the Louisiana Blues? I am reading the British at the Gate, which by the way is a great book. A little to long on the
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2002
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      Does anyone out there have any info on the Louisiana Blues? I am
      reading the British at the Gate, which by the way is a great book. A
      little to long on the what lead up to the war etc, but so far learning a
      lot on the batle of NO. (Considering I new nothing before it's not
      hard.)

      So anyway. The Blues were Irish (so the book sez) does anyone know what
      they wore for uniforms, if any? Anything about them please!

      Kevin
    • charlespk66
      ... book. A ... learning a ... know what ... Kevin, They were also known as White s Louisiana Blues as they were commanded by Captain Mansuel White at the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 2, 2002
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        --- In WarOf1812@y..., Kevin Windsor <kevin.windsor@s...> wrote:
        > Does anyone out there have any info on the Louisiana Blues? I am
        > reading the British at the Gate, which by the way is a great
        book. A
        > little to long on the what lead up to the war etc, but so far
        learning a
        > lot on the batle of NO. (Considering I new nothing before it's not
        > hard.)
        >
        > So anyway. The Blues were Irish (so the book sez) does anyone
        know what
        > they wore for uniforms, if any? Anything about them please!
        >
        > Kevin


        Kevin,
        They were also known as White's Louisiana Blues as they were
        commanded by Captain Mansuel White at the Battle of New Orleans.
        They were one of the five companies that made up le Bataillon
        d'Orleans (as it appears on their original roster from the battle)
        but better known as Plauche's Battalion during the battle. The
        original roster is in the Louisiana State Archives and has a list of
        all present in this company. It was the smallest company of the
        battalion. We've been in contact with Mansuel White III or IV (not
        sure which number) who is his direct descendant. His nephew is in
        our unit. Mr. White provided us copies of some of his memoirs. It
        contained an interesting story of how he brought a wounded officer
        of the 93rd Highlanders into his home after the battle to care for
        him. Many citizens of New Orleans did the same. The two met some
        twenty years later in New York City and were able to recognize each
        other.

        As to their uniforms, they belonged to a battalion who was described
        as having splendid and colorful styled uniforms. Tim Pickle's Osprey
        book has a print of the battalion from the 1830's clearly showing
        French influence with bearskins. At the time of the battle, the
        other companies were named Carabiniers, Chasseurs, Dragons, and
        Francs, so a definite French influence can be seen. It'd be hard to
        guess at the Blues from that print though. One could speculate that
        the name Blues implies a color of uniform. Given the economic
        history of the Irish in New Orleans at the time, they probably
        wouldn't have had the fanciest uniforms of the battalion. My web
        site on this unit gives what I hope is an educated guess at their
        appearance, but no other evidence is known to exist. We do know that
        this battalion alone was asked to stand in Jackson Square after the
        battle for the city's official congradulations of Jackson. According
        to "British at the Gate", Jackson chose this unit to provide a
        personal escort and set up a field tent next to them. This may just
        be because they were close to the center of the line. As some of
        their unit were Napoleonic veterans, they seemed to have impressed
        the General.

        Hope this answers your question without really answering your
        question. If anyone does have definitve evidence on their 1815
        appearance, we'd love to see it. I have been working this from the
        other side as well and found information on the formation of the
        Carabinier and Dragon companies during Galvez's rule in Louisiana in
        the 1780's. I've found color plates of these and the description
        says they were formed in part because the upper creole class needed
        a unit worthy of them joining. Many of the family names of these
        units show up prominently in the rosters of 1815.

        Charles Pecquet
        le Bataillon d'Orleans
      • petemonahan@aol.com
        Charles You tease, you! The rest of us read your answer to Kevin s question about the Irish Blues but I don t see your website address listed. Can we have
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2002
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          Charles
          You tease, you! The rest of us read your answer to Kevin's question about
          the Irish "Blues" but I don't see your website address listed. Can we have
          it so we too can check out this fascinating unit?

          Peter Monahan, Royal Newfoundland Reg"t (another one with lots of Irishmen in
          it!)
          petemonahan@...
          705-435-0953


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • charlespk66
          ... question about ... Can we have ... Irishmen in ... Peter, Sorry about that. Please look at: http://www.geocities.com/lebataillondorleans/ Charles
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2002
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            --- In WarOf1812@y..., petemonahan@a... wrote:
            > Charles
            > You tease, you! The rest of us read your answer to Kevin's
            question about
            > the Irish "Blues" but I don't see your website address listed.
            Can we have
            > it so we too can check out this fascinating unit?
            >
            > Peter Monahan, Royal Newfoundland Reg"t (another one with lots of
            Irishmen in
            > it!)
            > petemonahan@a...
            > 705-435-0953
            >


            Peter,
            Sorry about that. Please look at:

            http://www.geocities.com/lebataillondorleans/

            Charles
          • Larry Lozon
            From: charlespk66 Please look at: http://www.geocities.com/lebataillondorleans/ ... Charles, a very nice site and well worth the
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2002
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              From: "charlespk66" <charlespk66@...>

              Please look at:

              http://www.geocities.com/lebataillondorleans/

              ------------------------
              Charles, a very nice site and well worth the visit.
              Thank you for the URL.

              Charles, un emplacement tres gentil et bon en valeur la visite.
              Merci du URL.

              Larry
            • petemonahan@aol.com
              Charles Thanks for the address! Peter Monahan petemonahan@aol.com 705-435-0953 [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 3, 2002
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                Charles
                Thanks for the address!

                Peter Monahan
                petemonahan@...
                705-435-0953


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • BritcomHMP@aol.com
                In a message dated 12/2/2002 5:59:39 PM Central Standard Time, ... Charles gave you the details well but there is more to the story. Captain Maunsell faced an
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 3, 2002
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                  In a message dated 12/2/2002 5:59:39 PM Central Standard Time,
                  charlespk66@... writes:


                  > They were also known as White's Louisiana Blues as they were
                  > commanded by Captain Mansuel White at the Battle of New Orleans.
                  >

                  Charles gave you the details well but there is more to the story. Captain
                  Maunsell faced an English cousin at the battle (not directly you understand)
                  but Captain (later Colonel) Fredrick Maunsell of the 85th fought at the
                  battle. Of course on January 8th he was one of Thornton's detachment that
                  drove the routed Americans on the westbank 2 miles back from their positions.
                  He later became Colonel of the 85th and subsequently a General officer.

                  Cheers

                  Tim


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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