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Re: Pens and Histories

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  • colsjtjones2000
    Heavens forbid that I would ever want to get involved in a dialogue re metal nibs again! Doug ... I ve ... a ... to ... softened ... than ... the ... 1840s
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 3, 2002
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      Heavens forbid that I would ever want to get involved in a dialogue
      re metal nibs again! Doug



      --- In WarOf1812@y..., "lenthecooper" <lheidebrecht@L...> wrote:
      > Peter,
      > I don't think that this is quite correct. In the past few years
      I've
      > seen sutlers attempting to sell steel nibbed pen (often stuck into
      a
      > piece of broom corn as a handle. and feel this is just an attempt
      to
      > sell their items. Mind you if people will sell tricorn caps at 1812
      > events why not sell items which are well after our period. OK, OK,
      > that's another subject.
      >
      > Mell George, "Writing Antiques", Shire Publications LTD, 1996,UK
      >
      > Pg 5, Pens and Nibs
      > 'About 1823 some nibs were cut from horn and tortoiseshell,
      softened
      > and reinforced with chips of diamond, ruby and other gemstones for
      > greater durability. Thet made little impact for,in 1832, no less
      than
      > 33,668,000 quill pens were in use in Britian, most imported from
      the
      > continent.'...
      > '...quills almost disappeared when steel nibs were perfected..'
      > The book later goes onto speak toward the steel pen nibs of the
      1840s
      > and an 1849 glass pen and also about the reservoir systms for quill
      > pens (1819, the Penograghic Fountain Pen.)
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Len
      >
      > --- In WarOf1812@y..., petemonahan@a... wrote:
      > > Ted
      > > The short answer is that there were steel pen nibs by 1812, but
      > they were
      > > probably not common.
      > >
      > > I did some research a couple of years ago on steel nibbed pens.
      > They were
      > > patented, or some version was, about 1818 or so, by a clever chap
      > in
      > > Birmingham (?). Or so says the pen collectors club in the U.K.
      > (Sorry, this
      > > is approximate, but I've not got the references in front of me,
      but
      > the
      > > essentials are accurate.) My guess, based on that, was that they
      > must have
      > > been in use before that, especially given that the Romans had
      > bronze nibs by
      > > 300 C.E. Sure enough, I have found two mentions of steel nibs by
      > 1800.
      > > (Again, no exact references, but I might be able to find them.)
      > >
      > > My guess would be that professional clerks -Bureaucrats ! Ugh!
      > Spit twice!
      > > :) - used them. So, army clerks and staff wallahs had them, I'd
      > guess, while
      > > ordinary citizens used the (cheaper) quills, probaly well into
      the
      > 1820's &
      > > '30''s. I hope this helps.
      > >
      > > Peter Monahan, Company Clerk,
      > > Royal Newfoundland Regiment
      > >
      > > petemonahan@a...
      > > 705-435-0953
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • petemonahan@aol.com
      Len Yes, I read (and have) the Shire series pens book and had concluded as you do that steel nibs were post-us, but I ve since seen a reference which says
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 3, 2002
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        Len
        Yes, I read (and have) the Shire series pens book and had concluded as you do
        that steel nibs were post-us, but I've since seen a reference which says
        "earlier, by 1805". The key word in the book may be "perfected". I believe
        the earlist had no slit in the nib - simply a small steel blade, so likely
        very inefficient because only the ink. Anyway, I'll have to dig out my
        reference again. (By the by, I tend to agree with your assessment of the
        broom straw + nib sets, though to be fair the suttlers may have been told
        they were o.k. for 1812.)

        Peter Monahan
        petemonahan@...
        705-435-0953


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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