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Re: [WarOf1812] Militia Flank Companies

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  • Raymond Hobbs
    Letter from General Vincent to Prevost, May 19th, 1813: It is with regret that I can neither report favourably of their numbers nor their willing
    Message 1 of 32 , Jun 3, 2002
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      Letter from General Vincent to Prevost, May 19th, 1813:

      'It is with regret that I can neither report favourably of their
      numbers nor their willing co-operation. Every exertion has been made,
      and every expedient used, to bring them forward and unite their efforts
      to those of His Majesty's Forces, with but little effect: and desertion
      beyond all conception continues to mark their indifference to the
      important cause in which we are engaged.'

      Muster rolls for the Captain John Willson's' Company of the 3rd York
      Militia by October of that year show 1 Lieutenant and two privates
      reporting for duty!!!!! The two sergeants and just about everyone else
      had deserted. Tha Captain was home in 'sick'. In the following month,
      Lieutenant Vanderburg had also deserted. So they had the distinction of
      having 12 out of 14 soldiers AWOL. I think at times the Lincolns fare
      no better. By then many of them were engaged in "fetchin' and
      carryin'", and some barracks building, at least at the Head of the Lake.

      Not a pretty picture.

      My two cents' worth
      Ray Hobbs
      41st Regiment of Foot



      Kevin Windsor wrote:

      > At first they were designated flank coys because they would be called
      > up first and therefore had the best training, equipment and officers
      > of the militia. If needed all
      > other militia units would form up between them. At first this didn't
      > make much sense since it seems like you want a strong centre, but it
      > seems this way you have two
      > strongly drilled companies on each end. It makes it easier to line
      > up, dress etc with the two best sandwiching in everyone else. After
      > Brock is still grey for me. I am
      > not sure if they were still called flank companies, or if it was just
      > a regimental designation. They weren't called up first, but were
      > still the better trained group.
      > One reg't, which I can't remember, had three flank companies! Don't
      > know where they put number three?
      >
      > BritcomHMP@... wrote:
      >
      > > Interesting. So what was the point of designating 'flank companies'
      > then?
      >
      >
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      >
      > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds
      > of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
      > THOUSANDS of square miles...
      >
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mark Dickerson
      Funny story As part of the light company Royal Scots, we have been doing our best to portray light infantry for the past 13 years (gosh has it been that
      Message 32 of 32 , Dec 5, 2002
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        Funny story
        As part of the light company Royal Scots, we have been doing our best to portray light infantry for the past 13 years (gosh has it been that long?). We drill for 45 min every 2 weeks, battalion and light and we still have a long way to go to learn all the bugle and whistle calls let alone the verbal commands. Case in point. I gave the command "By the right, advance in files" and one veteran of 13 years says "What's that, have we done that before?" Which we have, for about 10 years. Oh well. Back to the drawing board. But it was funny at the time.
        Mark Dickerson

        ----- Original Message -----

        These HIGHLY TRAINED specialist troops were first trained in standard
        infantry drill and then, only when they were competent in that, they were
        taught the EXTRA drill deeded for Light work.



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