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blind stitching

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  • Roger Fuller
    Was blind stitching still being used on Brit Army cartridge box flaps and bayonet frogs in the Nap/1812 era? Roy Najecki, AWI expert, says he remembers reading
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 2, 1999
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      Was blind stitching still being used on Brit Army cartridge box flaps and
      bayonet frogs in the Nap/1812 era? Roy Najecki, AWI expert, says he
      remembers reading somwhere that by 1810 they stopped it. Any ideas from
      anybody out there on this topic?

      Roger Fuller
    • R Henderson
      Mr Fuller, I do like your material culture questions. Yes blind stitching was still being used on the pattern 1808 (60 round) cartridge pouch (original,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 2, 1999
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        Mr Fuller,

        I do like your material culture questions. Yes blind stitching was still being used on the pattern 1808 (60 round) cartridge pouch (original, Tower of London) as well
        as the 1817 pattern which went up to the Crimean War. This stitching is only on the latching tab attached to the flap. The bayonet frogs as well were being blind
        stitched, both the narrow pre-1812 pattern (original example 10th RVB, another original in England - forget the regiment right now) and the wider 1812-16 frogs. The 1817
        pattern continued to be blind-stitched but with a brass catch installed in it (original, 85th Regiment). This again went up to the Crimean War. Tell Roy I said hi.

        All the best,

        Robert Henderson



        Roger Fuller wrote:

        > From: "Roger Fuller" <fullerfamily@...>
        >
        > Was blind stitching still being used on Brit Army cartridge box flaps and
        > bayonet frogs in the Nap/1812 era? Roy Najecki, AWI expert, says he
        > remembers reading somwhere that by 1810 they stopped it. Any ideas from
        > anybody out there on this topic?
        >
        > Roger Fuller
        >
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      • Roger Fuller
        ... From: R Henderson To: WarOf1812@onelist.com Date: 02 June 1999 18:33 Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] blind
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 2, 1999
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          -----Original Message-----
          From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
          To: WarOf1812@onelist.com <WarOf1812@onelist.com>
          Date: 02 June 1999 18:33
          Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] blind stitching


          >From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
          >
          >Mr Fuller,
          >
          >I do like your material culture questions. Yes blind stitching was still
          being used on the pattern 1808 (60 round) cartridge pouch (original, Tower
          of London) as well
          >as the 1817 pattern which went up to the Crimean War. This stitching is
          only on the latching tab attached to the flap. The bayonet frogs as well
          were being blind
          >stitched, both the narrow pre-1812 pattern (original example 10th RVB,
          another original in England - forget the regiment right now) and the wider
          1812-16 frogs. The 1817
          >pattern continued to be blind-stitched but with a brass catch installed in
          it (original, 85th Regiment). This again went up to the Crimean War.
          Tell Roy I said hi.
          >
          >All the best,
          >
          >Robert Henderson
          >


          Will do- Roy is the sgt and QM of the AWI 40th Foot Lt Coy, of which I am a
          member, BTW.

          Now, where can I get access to an accurate pattern for these boxes? I'm
          using Keith Raynor's patterns (supplied to me by Les Handscombe) for
          accoutrements that are still being used for the 1/95th group in the UK.
          Oddly enough, they put a latching tab on the cartridge box - a design
          peculiar to the rifle regts.- stitched all the way through. I'm not too
          sure about that, even though all the Rifle Corps accoutrements were
          different from those of the line, but I feel the 60 round box was also
          sometimes used by rifle regts. after a while, solely because of the extra
          ammunition space available. (I have notes about this taken from Mrs. Brown's
          research at the ASK Brown Collection, which when I dig them out, I will find
          the W/O references she quoted.)

          Last week I finished an AWI "Rawle" pouch under Roy's tutelage; now, to make
          Rifles gear.

          Roger Fuller
        • Michael Mathews
          All right, I confess ignorance, what are the characteristics or differences in blind stitching? Serious answers only, Benton take your hands off the keyboard!
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 3, 1999
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            All right, I confess ignorance, what are the characteristics or differences
            in blind stitching? Serious answers only, Benton take your hands off the
            keyboard!

            Michael

            >From: "Roger Fuller" <fullerfamily@...>
            >
            >>From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
            >>
            >>Mr Fuller,
            >>
            >>I do like your material culture questions. Yes blind stitching was still
            >being used on the pattern 1808 (60 round) cartridge pouch (original, Tower
            >of London) as well
            >>as the 1817 pattern which went up to the Crimean War. This stitching is
            >only on the latching tab attached to the flap. The bayonet frogs as well
            >were being blind
            >>stitched, both the narrow pre-1812 pattern (original example 10th RVB,
            >another original in England - forget the regiment right now) and the wider
            >1812-16 frogs. The 1817
            >>pattern continued to be blind-stitched but with a brass catch installed in
            >it (original, 85th Regiment). This again went up to the Crimean War.
            >Tell Roy I said hi.
            >>
            >>All the best,
            >>
            >>Robert Henderson
            >>
            >
            >
            >Will do- Roy is the sgt and QM of the AWI 40th Foot Lt Coy, of which I am a
            >member, BTW.
            >
            >Now, where can I get access to an accurate pattern for these boxes? I'm
            >using Keith Raynor's patterns (supplied to me by Les Handscombe) for
            >accoutrements that are still being used for the 1/95th group in the UK.
            >Oddly enough, they put a latching tab on the cartridge box - a design
            >peculiar to the rifle regts.- stitched all the way through. I'm not too
            >sure about that, even though all the Rifle Corps accoutrements were
            >different from those of the line, but I feel the 60 round box was also
            >sometimes used by rifle regts. after a while, solely because of the extra
            >ammunition space available. (I have notes about this taken from Mrs. Brown's
            >research at the ASK Brown Collection, which when I dig them out, I will find
            >the W/O references she quoted.)
            >
            >Last week I finished an AWI "Rawle" pouch under Roy's tutelage; now, to make
            >Rifles gear.
            >
            >Roger Fuller
            >
            >
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