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Re: 95th & GLI Piping

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  • R Henderson
    Mr Fuller and Mr Lubka, The 95th Rifles and presumably the Glengarries had their jacket s collar, shoulder straps, and cuffs feathered with 3 yards of white
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1, 1999
      Mr Fuller and Mr Lubka,

      The 95th Rifles and presumably the Glengarries had their jacket's collar, shoulder straps, and cuffs "feathered" with 3 yards of white braid. Buglers had their jackets
      "feathered" with white cloth. This comes for the tailor book of the chief clothier of the British Infantry, Messrs. Pearse. First of all what is braid? The tailor book
      refers to some regiment's sergeants having braid on their coats. This in my opinion is a more narrow woolen lace that is seen on some volunteer coats. It is
      approximately 3/8 an inch wide. Braid at this time also referred to woven cord (cord referred to twist cord found on some bugle jackets of some lesser known rifle or
      light corps in the West Indies and Africa). I feel the former is the case with the 95th other ranks and not the latter.

      Feathering is not piping. Feathering actually protects the edge of the wool being feathered from wear. It is a technique used on French uniforms of the Napoleonic
      period as well. Lets see if I can explain it. You take your lace (braid) lay it on the facing material even with the edge. Run a seam as close to the edge as possible
      attaching the lace and facing material. Then take the lace and roll it underneath so that only the seam between the black facing material and lace shows on the outside
      and the unattached edge of the lace is on the underside. Finish it by attaching to the sleeve in the case of the cuff; sew the green underside of wool to the lace (ruff
      (raw) edged). The end result is around a 1/4 inch of woollen lace shows on the edge of the black facings, the end of the lace in between the facing and green fabric.
      The green fabric is raw edged. Wow its had to explain this one. But that is all I have time for.

      Why "braid" and not lace? You do not need 1/2 lace to do this technique, therefore cost savings. Remember always when making regimentals at this time: materials are
      expensive and labour is cheap. It is amuzing HOW MUCH WORK was done on some of the originals in order to save buying new materials. Therefore don't fall into that old
      misconception that "they would have only put in a couple of stitches to the inch because it would have save the tailor time." That is just, plain and simple, wrong.

      I hope this is of use,

      Yours sincerely,

      Robert Henderson



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    • Roger Fuller
      Interesting. Where can I find primary sources for the info below and extant examples of clothing to study from? Roger Fuller ... From: R Henderson
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 1, 1999
        Interesting. Where can I find primary sources for the info below and extant
        examples of clothing to study from?

        Roger Fuller

        -----Original Message-----
        From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
        To: WarOf1812@onelist.com <WarOf1812@onelist.com>
        Date: 01 June 1999 14:12
        Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] 95th & GLI Piping


        >From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
        >
        >Mr Fuller and Mr Lubka,
        >
        >The 95th Rifles and presumably the Glengarries had their jacket's collar,
        shoulder straps, and cuffs "feathered" with 3 yards of white braid. Buglers
        had their jackets
        >"feathered" with white cloth. This comes for the tailor book of the chief
        clothier of the British Infantry, Messrs. Pearse. First of all what is
        braid? The tailor book
        >refers to some regiment's sergeants having braid on their coats. This in
        my opinion is a more narrow woolen lace that is seen on some volunteer
        coats. It is
        >approximately 3/8 an inch wide. Braid at this time also referred to woven
        cord (cord referred to twist cord found on some bugle jackets of some lesser
        known rifle or
        >light corps in the West Indies and Africa). I feel the former is the case
        with the 95th other ranks and not the latter.
        >
        >Feathering is not piping. Feathering actually protects the edge of the
        wool being feathered from wear. It is a technique used on French uniforms
        of the Napoleonic
        >period as well. Lets see if I can explain it. You take your lace (braid)
        lay it on the facing material even with the edge. Run a seam as close to
        the edge as possible
        >attaching the lace and facing material. Then take the lace and roll it
        underneath so that only the seam between the black facing material and lace
        shows on the outside
        >and the unattached edge of the lace is on the underside. Finish it by
        attaching to the sleeve in the case of the cuff; sew the green underside of
        wool to the lace (ruff
        >(raw) edged). The end result is around a 1/4 inch of woollen lace shows on
        the edge of the black facings, the end of the lace in between the facing and
        green fabric.
        >The green fabric is raw edged. Wow its had to explain this one. But that
        is all I have time for.
        >
        >Why "braid" and not lace? You do not need 1/2 lace to do this technique,
        therefore cost savings. Remember always when making regimentals at this
        time: materials are
        >expensive and labour is cheap. It is amuzing HOW MUCH WORK was done on
        some of the originals in order to save buying new materials. Therefore
        don't fall into that old
        >misconception that "they would have only put in a couple of stitches to the
        inch because it would have save the tailor time." That is just, plain and
        simple, wrong.
        >
        >I hope this is of use,
        >
        >Yours sincerely,
        >
        >Robert Henderson
        >
        >
        >
        >***************************************************************************
        *
        >Visit the Discriminating General at: http://www.militaryheritage.com
        >Experience the War of 1812 at: http://www.militaryheritage.com/1812.htm
        >Heritage Film Services: http://www.militaryheritage.com/research.htm
        >
        >
        >THE Discriminating General
        >1121 Jean Park Road
        >Manotick, ON
        >K4M 1E4
        >CANADA
        >
        >Phone/FAX: (613)692-3577
        >
        >***************************************************************************
        *
        >
        >
        >
        >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >> Looking for a new hobby? Want to make a new friend?
        >> http://www.onelist.com
        >> Come join one of over 150,000 e-mail communities at ONElist!
        >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >> The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
        square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
        square miles...
        >
        >--
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >Looking to expand your world?
        >http://www.onelist.com
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        >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
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        square miles...
        >
      • R Henderson
        Dear Mr Fuller, The Pearse tailorbook is in the reserve collection (presently being stabilized in Conservation) in the Canadian War Museum. Glen Steppler drew
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 1, 1999
          Dear Mr Fuller,

          The Pearse tailorbook is in the reserve collection (presently being stabilized in Conservation) in the Canadian War Museum. Glen Steppler drew upon this rare resource
          for his chart of coat distinctions of regiments in his excellent article on British Nap.Coats. Figuring out feathering comes from reference to it in the 1830s and the
          use of the technique on original epaulettes of British coats (originals 65th Regiment, Parks Canada - 8th Regiment, Fort Henry, - St. John Rifles (copying after Rifle
          Brigade)) in the 1830s; cross-referenced with sewing techniques used on original habit-vests of French Light Infantry. There is an excellent example of braid on a
          tailor's prototype coat (1812) made of sergeant's quality cloth in the Can. War Museum as well. Keith Raynor sent me photos of a coat with similar braid in the UK.

          I think they used white cloth on the buglers because the result would be wider accents of white on the uniform; therefore more noticable on the field. Hey its all
          educated guess work, and that's my guess.

          Sincerely,

          Robert Henderson



          Roger Fuller wrote:

          > From: "Roger Fuller" <fullerfamily@...>
          >
          > Interesting. Where can I find primary sources for the info below and extant
          > examples of clothing to study from?
          >
          > Roger Fuller
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
          > To: WarOf1812@onelist.com <WarOf1812@onelist.com>
          > Date: 01 June 1999 14:12
          > Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] 95th & GLI Piping
          >
          > >From: R Henderson <dis.general@...>
          > >
          > >Mr Fuller and Mr Lubka,
          > >
          > >The 95th Rifles and presumably the Glengarries had their jacket's collar,
          > shoulder straps, and cuffs "feathered" with 3 yards of white braid. Buglers
          > had their jackets
          > >"feathered" with white cloth. This comes for the tailor book of the chief
          > clothier of the British Infantry, Messrs. Pearse. First of all what is
          > braid? The tailor book
          > >refers to some regiment's sergeants having braid on their coats. This in
          > my opinion is a more narrow woolen lace that is seen on some volunteer
          > coats. It is
          > >approximately 3/8 an inch wide. Braid at this time also referred to woven
          > cord (cord referred to twist cord found on some bugle jackets of some lesser
          > known rifle or
          > >light corps in the West Indies and Africa). I feel the former is the case
          > with the 95th other ranks and not the latter.
          > >
          > >Feathering is not piping. Feathering actually protects the edge of the
          > wool being feathered from wear. It is a technique used on French uniforms
          > of the Napoleonic
          > >period as well. Lets see if I can explain it. You take your lace (braid)
          > lay it on the facing material even with the edge. Run a seam as close to
          > the edge as possible
          > >attaching the lace and facing material. Then take the lace and roll it
          > underneath so that only the seam between the black facing material and lace
          > shows on the outside
          > >and the unattached edge of the lace is on the underside. Finish it by
          > attaching to the sleeve in the case of the cuff; sew the green underside of
          > wool to the lace (ruff
          > >(raw) edged). The end result is around a 1/4 inch of woollen lace shows on
          > the edge of the black facings, the end of the lace in between the facing and
          > green fabric.
          > >The green fabric is raw edged. Wow its had to explain this one. But that
          > is all I have time for.
          > >
          > >Why "braid" and not lace? You do not need 1/2 lace to do this technique,
          > therefore cost savings. Remember always when making regimentals at this
          > time: materials are
          > >expensive and labour is cheap. It is amuzing HOW MUCH WORK was done on
          > some of the originals in order to save buying new materials. Therefore
          > don't fall into that old
          > >misconception that "they would have only put in a couple of stitches to the
          > inch because it would have save the tailor time." That is just, plain and
          > simple, wrong.
          > >
          > >I hope this is of use,
          > >
          > >Yours sincerely,
          > >
          > >Robert Henderson
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >***************************************************************************
          > *
          > >Visit the Discriminating General at: http://www.militaryheritage.com
          > >Experience the War of 1812 at: http://www.militaryheritage.com/1812.htm
          > >Heritage Film Services: http://www.militaryheritage.com/research.htm
          > >
          > >
          > >THE Discriminating General
          > >1121 Jean Park Road
          > >Manotick, ON
          > >K4M 1E4
          > >CANADA
          > >
          > >Phone/FAX: (613)692-3577
          > >
          > >***************************************************************************
          > *
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >> Looking for a new hobby? Want to make a new friend?
          > >> http://www.onelist.com
          > >> Come join one of over 150,000 e-mail communities at ONElist!
          > >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >> The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
          > square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
          > square miles...
          > >
          > >--
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >Looking to expand your world?
          > >http://www.onelist.com
          > >ONElist has over 150,000 e-mail communities from which to chose!
          > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
          > square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
          > square miles...
          > >
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > ONElist members are using Shared Files in great ways!
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          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

          --
          ****************************************************************************
          Visit the Discriminating General at: http://www.militaryheritage.com
          Experience the War of 1812 at: http://www.militaryheritage.com/1812.htm
          Heritage Film Services: http://www.militaryheritage.com/research.htm


          THE Discriminating General
          1121 Jean Park Road
          Manotick, ON
          K4M 1E4
          CANADA

          Phone/FAX: (613)692-3577

          ****************************************************************************
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