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RE: [WarOf1812] "Queen Mum," has died. She was 101

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  • Peter Catley
    Tim, The version I heard of this story was slightly different, One evening the QM rang for a servant to get her a drink, I assume her beloved Gin and Tonic,
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 1, 2002
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      Tim,

      The version I heard of this story was slightly different,

      One evening the QM rang for a servant to get her a drink, I assume her
      beloved Gin and Tonic, getting no response she went to find the staff and
      found the staff as you described and she is reputed to have said "If you two
      old queen's have quite finished, this old Queen needs a drink"

      Cheers

      Peter Catley



      > LONDON, England (CNN)
      >
      > The Queen Mother, the creator of the modern British monarchy, died
      Saturday
      > at the
      > age of 101. Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother died in her sleep at Royal
      > Lodge, Windsor,
      > Buckingham Palace announced.
      >
      >

      Some may be aware that 'The Queen Mum' is perhaps the only person to have
      literally attended her own funeral while still alive. Her death has been
      anticipated for at least the last 20 years and plans for same have been
      made.
      These plans were put into effect when there was another death in the Royal
      Family, of a lady born a commoner who was raised by marriage to the rank of
      Royal Highness. Yes indeed, Diana Princess of Wales.

      I recall a funny story I herd of her once. As many will know most of the
      servants in the royal palaces & houses are gay; one day the Queens breakfast
      was late, very late and she could get no response to the bell, going to the
      servants quarters she found two of her servants involved in a lovers tiff
      oblivious to everything going on around them. HM stood in the doorway and
      announced in a slightly miffed voice "Are you two aware that one Queen here
      has not yet had her breakfast?"

      RIP

      Tim
    • Peter Catley
      Her title would I believe depend on the titles held by the family and she was I think the eighth child out of nine in Lord Strathmore s family but as a child
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 1, 2002
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        Her title would I believe depend on the titles held by the family and she
        was I think the eighth child out of nine in Lord Strathmore's family but as
        a child of such a family would be entitled to "Honourable" and on reaching
        21 years of age she would become Lady.

        A "commoner" comes from any non-royal family, so these days that is most
        people! As for references, traditionally Debrett's and Burke's Peerages are
        the sources, but I was very disappointed when I looked at their Web pages.

        I am sorry to have to admit that I am pretty ignorant of how the Peerage
        system works, it isn't really relevant on a day to day basis. Tim's comment
        seem spot on (as ever)

        However this may be of interest, there is even a significant link to our
        period :) :

        HM QUEEN ELIZABETH THE QUEEN MOTHER; Lady Elizabeth Angela Marguerite, nee
        Bowes-Lyon; Lady of the Order of the Garter (1936), Lady of the Order of the
        Thistle (1937), CI (1931), GCVO (1937), GBE (1927); da of 14 Earl of
        Strathmore and Kinghorne, KG, KT, GCVO, TD, JP, DL (d 1944) and Nina
        Cecilia, GCVO (d 1938), da of Rev Charles William Frederick
        Cavendish-Bentinck (gs of 3 Duke of Portland, who was twice Prime Minister
        during King George III's reign); b 4 Aug 1900: m 26 April 1923, HM King
        George VI (d 6 Feb 1952); 2 da; Col-in-Chief: 1 Queen's Dragoon Gds, The
        Queen's Own Hussars, 9/12 Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's), King's Regt,
        Royal Anglian Regt, Light Inf, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regt), RAMC,
        The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regt) of Canada, The Toronto Scottish Regt,
        Canadian Forces Medical Services; Hon Col: Royal Yeo, London Scottish
        (Gordon Highlanders) (TA), Univ of London Contingent OTC; Cmdt-in-Chief:
        WRNS, WRAC, RAF Central Fly-ing Sch, WRAF, Nursing Corps and Divs St John
        Ambulance Bde; hon member of Lloyd's; pres British Red Cross Soc 1937-52,
        since when dep pres; pres Royal Highland and Agric Soc 1963-64; Gold Albert
        Medal of RSA 1952; Grand Master Royal Victorian Order 1937-; pres Univ Coll
        of Rhodesia and Nyasaland 1957-70, chllr London Univ 1955-81, first chllr
        Dundee Univ 1967; bencher Middle Temple 1944 (tres 1949); hon fellow London
        Univ, and of King's Coll London; FRS; appointed Lord Warden and Admiral of
        the Cinque Ports and Constable of Dover Castle (the first woman to hold this
        office) 1978; received Royal Victorian Chain 1937; Grand Cross of Legion of
        Honour; GCStJ; celebrated her 100th birthday 4 Aug 2000, becoming the first
        member of a European royal family to achieve such a distinction. Residences
        Clarence House, London SW1A 1BA; Royal Lodge, Windsor Great Park, Berks;
        Birkhall, Ballater, Aberdeenshire; Castle of Mey, Caithnessshire

        Cheers now.

        Peter Catley

        -----Original Message-----
        From: susan@... [mailto:susan@...]
        Sent: 01 April 2002 01:12
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: "Queen Mum," has died. She was 101

        I'm not at all sure how the British system of titles works, but the
        Queen Mum was not Lady Bowes-Lyon before she was married, but rather
        "The Honourable Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon"-- apparently a "rank" lower than
        "Lady." Perhaps one of our British list members could explain this --
        or someone could give a good book reference? The BBC has been calling
        her a commoner-born Queen all day -- one would hope that they know what
        they were talking about (?). ;-)

        I think that the ultimate tribute to the Queen Mum was paid to her by,
        of all people, Adolph Hitler, who called her "the most dangerous woman
        in Europe" because of her ability to raise the spirits of all of England
        and the Commonwealth and to spearhead the war support effort. If I were
        her, I'd have taken that as a tremendous compliment.

        She goes to a well-deserved rest, and the world is a less bright place
        because of her passing.

        -- Sioux



        The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
        square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
        square miles...

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      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        In a message dated 4/1/2002 2:51:34 AM Central Standard Time, ... Either or both could well be true Peter. She was a remarkable lady with a great zest for
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 1, 2002
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          In a message dated 4/1/2002 2:51:34 AM Central Standard Time,
          peter.catley@... writes:


          > The version I heard of this story was slightly different,
          >
          > One evening the QM rang for a servant to get her a drink, I assume her
          > beloved Gin and Tonic, getting no response she went to find the staff and
          > found the staff as you described and she is reputed to have said "If you two
          > old queen's have quite finished, this old Queen needs a drink"
          >
          >

          Either or both could well be true Peter. She was a remarkable lady with a
          great zest for life, an acquaintance of mine here in the States knew her
          quite well through his ownership of racehorses. He told me once that, while
          dining with her, his face must have registered shock at one of her statements
          to which she remarked "You know, I am not quite the sweet old biddy everybody
          thinks I am!"

          Britain, and the world, is poorer for her passing.

          Tim


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