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Re: [WarOf1812] Welch in North America

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  • Raymond Hobbs
    Right On, O Royal Newfie! I believe the Regiment still wears the tabs. It was not amalgamated into the Royal Regiment of Wales. Another unusual distinction of
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2002
      Right On, O Royal Newfie!
      I believe the Regiment still wears the tabs. It was not amalgamated
      into the Royal Regiment of Wales.
      Another unusual distinction of the RWF (2nd Battalion) is that during
      the First World War they had an inordinate number of poets among
      officers and rankers, including Robert Graves and Siegfried Sassoon.
      The definitive work on the 2/RWF in WW1 is Captain J.C. Dunn, Medical
      Officer, "The War the Infantry Knew".
      Their only problem is that they come from North Wales!
      ;->)
      Ray

      petemonahan@... wrote:

      > Another Welch - North American connection, I think ( help me here,
      > Ray!).
      > When Wolfe was killed at Quebec, his old regiment decided that the
      > black
      > ribbons tieing up the regimental queues would be deemed to be a sign
      > of
      > mourning for him. After the queue was abolished, the regiment
      > continued to
      > wear two black tabs on the back of their collars - well into this
      > century and
      > perhaps to date (I haven't my sources with me.) And I think that
      > regiment
      > was the RW Fusileers.
      >
      > Happy St. David's Day!
      >
      > Peter Monahan
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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      >
      > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds
      > of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
      > THOUSANDS of square miles...
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Raymond Hobbs
      ... Ray Hobbs 41st ... ADVERTISEMENT ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2002
        > Since we are on this thread. the 24th (later the South Wales
        > Borderers) was used in the Rebellion of 1837, and was commanded by
        > Henry James Townshend, who fought in the War of 1812 as an Ensign in
        > the 41st. As CO of the 24th he went back to Amherstburg in 1838.
        > Townshend died in Britain at a ripe old age with the rank of General.

        Ray Hobbs
        41st


        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        ADVERTISEMENT


        >
        > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds
        > of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
        > THOUSANDS of square miles...
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Raymond Hobbs
        ... Ray Hobbs 41st ... ADVERTISEMENT ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 1, 2002
          > Since we are on this thread. the 24th (later the South Wales
          > Borderers) was used in the Rebellion of 1837, and was commanded by
          > Henry Dive Townshend, who fought in the War of 1812 as an Ensign in
          > the 41st. As CO of the 24th he went back to Amherstburg in 1838.
          > Townshend died in Britain at a ripe old age with the rank of General.

          Ray Hobbs
          41st


          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          ADVERTISEMENT


          >
          > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds
          > of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
          > THOUSANDS of square miles...
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • petemonahan@aol.com
          Another Welch - North American connection, I think ( help me here, Ray!). When Wolfe was killed at Quebec, his old regiment decided that the black ribbons
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 1, 2002
            Another Welch - North American connection, I think ( help me here, Ray!).
            When Wolfe was killed at Quebec, his old regiment decided that the black
            ribbons tieing up the regimental queues would be deemed to be a sign of
            mourning for him. After the queue was abolished, the regiment continued to
            wear two black tabs on the back of their collars - well into this century and
            perhaps to date (I haven't my sources with me.) And I think that regiment
            was the RW Fusileers.

            Happy St. David's Day!

            Peter Monahan



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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