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Re: Musket Explosion

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  • badger222ca
    ... relying on police press releases for things like spelling or correct ... weapon was watching a Clint Eastwood movie and I think it s ... anything from a
    Message 1 of 39 , Jan 4, 2002
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      --- In WarOf1812@y..., "cplwattie" <cwattie@n...> wrote:
      > Tut tut Pte Avery: you of all people should know the perils of
      relying on police press releases for things like spelling or correct
      > ages.
      > Combine that with a reporter whose sole experience handling a
      weapon was watching a Clint Eastwood movie and I think it's
      > entirely possible that the firearm in question could've been
      anything from a Brown Bess to an 1860s-era breech loader....
      >

      An nescis, mi fili, quantilla sapientia mundus regatur?

      TA
    • colsjtjones2000
      In reviewing my message #13236 below, I must admit I don t think it is particularly appropriate to the discussion. Teddy was discussing artillery. We are
      Message 39 of 39 , Jan 10, 2002
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        In reviewing my message #13236 below, I must admit I don't think it
        is particularly appropriate to the discussion. Teddy was discussing
        artillery. We are talking about muskets or rifles.

        But I would say that the reproductions we use have modern
        steel barrels of much greater strenght than the originals. And being
        recent, have not suffered the depredations of time, neglect and
        uncertain maintenance. Anyone using a 150 year old plus original in
        re-enactment is an accident waiting to happen.

        Doug


        --- In WarOf1812@y..., "colsjtjones2000" <colsjtjones2000@y...> wrote:
        > Teddy Roosevelt in his "The Naval War of 1812" mentions the
        frequency
        > of breech explosions of American forged guns, due to structual
        > problems in American foundries. Doug
        >
        >
        > --- In WarOf1812@y..., Angela Gottfred <agottfre@t...> wrote:
        > > We needn't look to modern explanations (e.g. use of smokeless
        > powder) for
        > > exploding muskets. Sadly, I have found many fur trade accounts of
        > mangled
        > > hands and arms as a result of exploding trade guns, c. 1800-1820.
        > Why did
        > > they explode? Presumably as a result of incorrect loading or weak
        > barrels.
        > > The same problems can occur today.
        > >
        > > In haste,
        > > Your humble & obedient servant,
        > > Angela Gottfred
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