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Re: [WarOf1812] Re: If The War of 1812 had continued..

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  • PEGGY MATHEWS
    Very true, and Mr. Roosevelt s opinion, though written at a time when warfare was still romanticized in some circles. What isn t mentioned is besides the
    Message 1 of 39 , Nov 29, 2001
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      Very true, and Mr. Roosevelt's opinion, though written at a time when warfare was still romanticized in some circles. What isn't mentioned is besides the Pomone (38), the Tenedos (38) and another smaller un-named ship were in sight. Given the odds, the casualties suffered against the Endymion (1/5th according to Hickey) and the damage suffered it was perhaps a humanitarian gesture. Guess we'd have to ask Decatur.

      "The President was later condemned by the British and sold at public auction in Bermuda for $65,000." - Hickey, page 216. Wonder who got her and what happened after?

      In any case a painful loss to the US Navy.

      Michael

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: colsjtjones2000@...
      Sent: Thursday, November 29, 2001 9:31 PM
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: If The War of 1812 had continued..

      HMS Endymion was rated as a 40 gun 5th rate and fir built. She
      carried 28x24pdr guns, 20x32pdr carronades and 2x9pdr guns. (Ain't
      the rating system wonderful?) USS President was rated as a 44, as
      were her sisters. I understand that initially her spar deck was
      fully armed end to end, but at the time of this engagement, her
      midships had been cleared to a more conventional arrangement.

      Although Decatur had disabled Endymion by destroying her sails (2
      hours later she again took up the chase), Teddy Roosevelt says of the
      immediately subsequent action "But I regret to say--- that he
      (Decatur) acted rather tamely, certainly not heroically, in striking
      to the Pomone." "It is not very pleasant to criticise the actions of
      an American whose name is better known than that of almost any other
      single-ship captain of his time; but if a man is as much as to be
      praised for doing fairly, or even badly, as for doing excellently,
      then there is no use in bestowing praise at all."

      Doug

      (snip)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • PEGGY MATHEWS
      Very true, and Mr. Roosevelt s opinion, though written at a time when warfare was still romanticized in some circles. What isn t mentioned is besides the
      Message 39 of 39 , Nov 29, 2001
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        Very true, and Mr. Roosevelt's opinion, though written at a time when warfare was still romanticized in some circles. What isn't mentioned is besides the Pomone (38), the Tenedos (38) and another smaller un-named ship were in sight. Given the odds, the casualties suffered against the Endymion (1/5th according to Hickey) and the damage suffered it was perhaps a humanitarian gesture. Guess we'd have to ask Decatur.

        "The President was later condemned by the British and sold at public auction in Bermuda for $65,000." - Hickey, page 216. Wonder who got her and what happened after?

        In any case a painful loss to the US Navy.

        Michael

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: colsjtjones2000@...
        Sent: Thursday, November 29, 2001 9:31 PM
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: If The War of 1812 had continued..

        HMS Endymion was rated as a 40 gun 5th rate and fir built. She
        carried 28x24pdr guns, 20x32pdr carronades and 2x9pdr guns. (Ain't
        the rating system wonderful?) USS President was rated as a 44, as
        were her sisters. I understand that initially her spar deck was
        fully armed end to end, but at the time of this engagement, her
        midships had been cleared to a more conventional arrangement.

        Although Decatur had disabled Endymion by destroying her sails (2
        hours later she again took up the chase), Teddy Roosevelt says of the
        immediately subsequent action "But I regret to say--- that he
        (Decatur) acted rather tamely, certainly not heroically, in striking
        to the Pomone." "It is not very pleasant to criticise the actions of
        an American whose name is better known than that of almost any other
        single-ship captain of his time; but if a man is as much as to be
        praised for doing fairly, or even badly, as for doing excellently,
        then there is no use in bestowing praise at all."

        Doug

        (snip)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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