Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Last Post: was [britregiments] Ypres

Expand Messages
  • PEGGY MATHEWS
    Doug, As a citizen of the United States, which has different memorial ceremonies, I had never even heard of the Last Post till Mississinewa this year. It
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 2, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Doug,

      As a citizen of the United States, which has different memorial ceremonies, I had never even heard of the Last Post till Mississinewa this year. It obviously held special significance to my comrades around the fire that evening, but I was embarrassed to reveal my ignorance. Since I get to Canada once every three years or so for events and am not a veteran of the armed forces (I was turned down) it should not be a surprise that I was uninformed. Now, having swallowed my foolish pride and asked, I will know how to behave in the future.

      I'll be interested to see if there is a period appropriate piece that holds similar implications. I tend to guess no as it seems we've only come to honor the fallen with set ceremonies, as opposed to conventions, in the last 100-140 years.

      Regards,

      Michael M.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: colsjtjones2000@...
      Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 3:09 PM
      To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

      I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
      the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
      1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
      regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
      advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
      period. Doug

      (big snip)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kevin Windsor
      Mike, please don t feel embarrassed. There are many in Canada that don t see the significance of the last post, remembrance day, or honouring the veterans at
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 2, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Mike, please don't feel embarrassed. There are many in Canada that don't see the significance of the last post, remembrance day, or honouring the veterans at all. You have been educated on the emotional, cultural significance of a piece of music played on a bugle. That is minor to having to educate the library services in Ontario that Veterans should have the right to canvass poppies in libraries or wherever they damn well please. They are after all why we can have libraries!

        PEGGY MATHEWS wrote:

        > Doug,
        >
        > As a citizen of the United States, which has different memorial ceremonies, I had never even heard of the Last Post till Mississinewa this year. It obviously held special significance to my comrades around the fire that evening, but I was embarrassed to reveal my ignorance. Since I get to Canada once every three years or so for events and am not a veteran of the armed forces (I was turned down) it should not be a surprise that I was uninformed. Now, having swallowed my foolish pride and asked, I will know how to behave in the future.
        >
      • Peter Catley
        Michael and others, My error :) I thought you were a Canadian citizen thus my surprise about the Last Post not been known to the Canadians, I am sorry for the
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 3, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Michael and others,

          My error :) I thought you were a Canadian citizen thus my surprise about the
          Last Post not been known to the Canadians, I am sorry for the error but
          pleased to hear that Canada maintains the same remembrance for the troops, I
          personally think the "poppy" symbol is one of the most powerful we have to
          remind people of our history.

          However it always dates our politicians on television when their speeches
          are re-shown, if they've got a poppy on it was made between 1 Nov and 11 Nov
          :)

          You may find this following reference helpful. It is about the recent
          250,000 sounding at Menin Gate and includes an MP3 sample!

          http://www.greatwar.co.uk/westfront/ypsalient/meningate/lastpost.htm

          This is more emotional but the poem is one used widely in the UK.

          http://www.kvacanada.f2s.com/the_last_post.htm

          John-Paul Johnson's contribution seems logical to me although I had not
          heard the bit about the Officer of the watch.

          I found this snippet :

          The Bugle Call "Last Post"

          Its origin dates back as far as 1544, when it was used for posting guards.
          The first official War Office version appeared in 1798, as part of a
          sequence of calls known as Setting the Watch.
          The Last Post was sounded at 10:00pm, to end the day's work. Originally it
          was a cavalry call sounded on trumpets but was later adapted for bugles.
          At http://www.camelot-intl.com/tower_site/traditions/keys.html but I cannot
          vouch for its accuracy.

          It does suggest though that The Last Post could well have been in period for
          the Peninsula War and the War of 1812.

          Enjoy!

          P**
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.