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Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

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  • John-Paul Johnson
    ... Are you sure that The Last Post didn t exist then? I got this from the ANZAC day website: Last Post The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
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      olsjtjones2000@... wrote:
      >
      > I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
      > the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
      > 1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
      > regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
      > advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
      > period. Doug
      >

      Are you sure that "The Last Post" didn't exist then?

      I got this from the ANZAC day website:

      Last Post

      The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the end of day
      traditions which include Beating the Retreat and Tattoo.
      Retreat is the older custom dating back to the 16th Century and
      consisting of prolonged drum beating at sunset to warn the night guard
      to mount and also to give notice that the gates of the town walls were
      about to close. This custom was also part of the end of day battle
      procedure when volleys were fired and a hymn played in honour of those
      who had fallen during the day. At this time of evening the colour would
      be trooped. Today this latter activity is replaced by the lowering of
      the National Flag.

      There is some confusion over the ‘post’ calls. It seems that the ‘First
      Post’ and 'Last Post' came into being in the early part of the 19th
      Century. The ‘First Post’ was sounded as the orderly officer, the
      orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo. They
      then marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum. Upon
      reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. (This is
      why drummers carry a bugle.)

      The Last Post was really the end of the day (a hard day’s fighting and a
      hard night’s drinking).

      This bugle call has been passed down through the centuries in many
      countries of the world as an accompaniment to the impressive rites of a
      soldier’s farewell - the closing bars wail out their sad valediction to
      the departing warrior.
      ----------------

      This matches well with what I was taught during my Basic Officer Course
      lo these many years ago.

      J-P Johnson
      Royal Nfld Reg't
      --------------
      J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/
    • Chewie
      While at RHS the first post was played by bugler in morning and the colours were taken down with calls upon the Bosun s Call at the end of the day . Obviously
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 3, 2001
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        While at RHS the first post was played by bugler in morning and the colours were taken down with calls upon the Bosun's Call at the end of the day . Obviously the Bowfin's call cannot play the last post , so the bugle should have been there . It was a Naval establishment .

        Chewie
        unit commander
        50th West Kent Regiment Re Enactment Unit
        " not a good looking bunch , but devilish steady"
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: John-Paul Johnson
        To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 9:40 PM
        Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres


        olsjtjones2000@... wrote:
        >
        > I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
        > the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
        > 1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
        > regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
        > advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
        > period. Doug
        >

        Are you sure that "The Last Post" didn't exist then?

        I got this from the ANZAC day website:

        Last Post

        The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the end of day
        traditions which include Beating the Retreat and Tattoo.
        Retreat is the older custom dating back to the 16th Century and
        consisting of prolonged drum beating at sunset to warn the night guard
        to mount and also to give notice that the gates of the town walls were
        about to close. This custom was also part of the end of day battle
        procedure when volleys were fired and a hymn played in honour of those
        who had fallen during the day. At this time of evening the colour would
        be trooped. Today this latter activity is replaced by the lowering of
        the National Flag.

        There is some confusion over the 'post' calls. It seems that the 'First
        Post' and 'Last Post' came into being in the early part of the 19th
        Century. The 'First Post' was sounded as the orderly officer, the
        orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo. They
        then marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum. Upon
        reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. (This is
        why drummers carry a bugle.)

        The Last Post was really the end of the day (a hard day's fighting and a
        hard night's drinking).

        This bugle call has been passed down through the centuries in many
        countries of the world as an accompaniment to the impressive rites of a
        soldier's farewell - the closing bars wail out their sad valediction to
        the departing warrior.
        ----------------

        This matches well with what I was taught during my Basic Officer Course
        lo these many years ago.

        J-P Johnson
        Royal Nfld Reg't
        --------------
        J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/

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        The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Chewie
        Sorry My memory is slipping . during evening ceremony bugler was there . The sequence was Bosun s Call played Still , then bugler played last post , Followed
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 3, 2001
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          Sorry
          My memory is slipping . during evening ceremony bugler was there . The sequence was Bosun's Call played Still , then bugler played last post , Followed by Call again playing Carry On .
          Again apologies for this Fau Parr . Brain approaching 40 .

          Chewie
          unit commander
          50th West Kent Regiment Re Enactment Unit
          " not a good looking bunch , but devilish steady"
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Chewie
          To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, November 03, 2001 4:44 PM
          Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres


          While at RHS the first post was played by bugler in morning and the colours were taken down with calls upon the Bosun's Call at the end of the day . Obviously the Bowfin's call cannot play the last post , so the bugle should have been there . It was a Naval establishment .

          Chewie
          unit commander
          50th West Kent Regiment Re Enactment Unit
          " not a good looking bunch , but devilish steady"
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: John-Paul Johnson
          To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 9:40 PM
          Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres


          olsjtjones2000@... wrote:
          >
          > I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
          > the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
          > 1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
          > regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
          > advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
          > period. Doug
          >

          Are you sure that "The Last Post" didn't exist then?

          I got this from the ANZAC day website:

          Last Post

          The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the end of day
          traditions which include Beating the Retreat and Tattoo.
          Retreat is the older custom dating back to the 16th Century and
          consisting of prolonged drum beating at sunset to warn the night guard
          to mount and also to give notice that the gates of the town walls were
          about to close. This custom was also part of the end of day battle
          procedure when volleys were fired and a hymn played in honour of those
          who had fallen during the day. At this time of evening the colour would
          be trooped. Today this latter activity is replaced by the lowering of
          the National Flag.

          There is some confusion over the 'post' calls. It seems that the 'First
          Post' and 'Last Post' came into being in the early part of the 19th
          Century. The 'First Post' was sounded as the orderly officer, the
          orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo. They
          then marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum. Upon
          reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. (This is
          why drummers carry a bugle.)

          The Last Post was really the end of the day (a hard day's fighting and a
          hard night's drinking).

          This bugle call has been passed down through the centuries in many
          countries of the world as an accompaniment to the impressive rites of a
          soldier's farewell - the closing bars wail out their sad valediction to
          the departing warrior.
          ----------------

          This matches well with what I was taught during my Basic Officer Course
          lo these many years ago.

          J-P Johnson
          Royal Nfld Reg't
          --------------
          J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/

          Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          ADVERTISEMENT




          The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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