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Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

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  • HQ93rd@aol.com
    I have stood at the Menin Gate in Wipers and heard Last Post sounded on bugles by the local Belgian constabulary. Combined with the sight of all those tens
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 1, 2001
      I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post sounded on
      bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
      Combined with the sight of all those tens of thousands of names inscribed on
      the massive walls of the memorial Gate (along with just as many at nearby
      Tyne Cot cemetery), it is something one never forgets....

      B

      In a message dated 1/11/01 3:25:58 PM, gam1947@... writes:

      << Ladies and Gentlemen,

      The clipping below is from Canada, in the electronic newspapers on the web
      there is nothing about it from Australia, Britain, NZ, and this is the only
      one in the Canadian media. One would hope that it was in the actual print
      copies!

      Quite sad.

      Yours,
      G/.

      Thursday, November 1, 2001 The Halifax Herald Limited
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Commonwealth soldiers honoured in Ypres
      Nova Scotia Highlanders among those to pay tribute to fallen

      Virginia Mayo / The Associated Press
      By Roberta Cowan / The Canadian Press

      Ypres, Belgium - Last Post sounded for the 25,000th time under the Menin
      Gate on Wednesday to a quiet gathering of dignitaries honouring fallen
      Commonwealth soldiers. A lone Canadian piper played the Flowers of the
      Forest Lament.

      "While I was piping I was thinking of all the men and women who gave their
      lives here, so many Canadians," said Sgt. Karen MacLean of the Nova Scotia
      Highlander Regiment.

      "And then the poppies began to fall" from the towering gate, she said. "It
      has been very emotional."

      Seventy-five Canadians were among those at the ceremony marking the 25,000th
      playing of the trumpet tribute to fallen soldiers at the Menin Gate war
      memorial - an imposing stone archway with walls 15 metres tall.

      Prince Philip, in army service uniform, and Princess Astrid of Belgium were
      greeted with a full guard of honour comprising soldiers from Canadian,
      British, New Zealand, Australian and Belgium regiments.

      The crowd of about 1,000 came to honour the 250,000 soldiers who lost their
      lives in the battlefields of Ypres Salient between 1914 and 1918. More than
      7,000 were Canadian.

      Carmen Provenzano, parliamentary secretary to the veterans affairs minister,
      led the Canadian delegation that included veterans and nurses groups, next
      of kin, the Nova Scotia Highlanders and the Ontario Lincoln and Welland Army
      regiments.

      "This trip pays tribute to those who gave their lives in war so that future
      generations might live their lives in peace," Provenzano said. "I know that
      each member of the delegation will come home moved by what they have seen."

      Guy Gruwez, chairman of the Last Post Association since 1966, said: "Today
      we remember the 250,000 British soldiers - by British I mean men from
      Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other Commonwealth countries - who gave
      up their lives so that we would know our independence and freedom."

      The ceremony was simple but powerful, beginning with the guard of honour and
      the national anthems from each of the Commonwealth countries commemorated.

      Seven volunteer fire brigade buglers played Last Post, and later ended with
      the Reveille - the dawn bugle salute used here to signal the soldiers'
      eternal life after death. An ecumenical church service followed with the
      bishop of Belgium presiding.

      The Menin Gate memorial was erected in 1928 to the memory the Commonwealth
      soldiers who fell in Belgium and have no known grave. The gate to the city
      was chosen as the spot where the traditional trumpet salute would sound
      because thousands of soldiers marched through these gate to the
      battlegrounds of Ypres Salient, never to return.

      The memorial contains the names of 54,896 soldiers, including 7,000
      Canadians.

      Last Post was originally played here by the volunteer fire brigade.

      After the Second World War, the Last Post Association took on the duty of
      playing the tune every evening at 8 o'clock come rain or shine. The
      tradition was suspended only from 1940 to 1944 when Nazi Germany occupied
      Ypres. In those years, the daily ceremony was held in Surrey, England.

      The Canadian army, joined by Polish troops, liberated Ypres on Dec. 6, 1944.

      Legend has it that once the Germans were pushed back past the gate, Last
      Post was heard again at 8 p.m. even though the battle was still raging in
      other parts of town.

      "We will continue to play the Last Post as a reminder to younger generations
      of the lessons we can learn from the generosity, comradeship and sense of
      duty these armies showed, so that we might live in a better world," Gruwez
      said.

      Ypres was destroyed in the First World War, which unleashed for the first
      time the flame-thrower, poison gas, air raids, tanks and the machine-gun,
      resulting in astounding casualties.

      Rebuilt as a town of 35,000, Ypres now has the dove as its motif. Every
      year, 200,000 tourists visit the town and the surrounding West Belgian
      farmlands where Allied troops held off the Germans from 1914 to 1918.

      There are 137 military cemeteries in this area, one with 35,000 graves. A
      German graveyard holds 44,000. The names on the Menin Gate almost equal the
      American death toll in Vietnam.

      John McCrae, a doctor from Guelph, Ont., penned probably the best-known war
      poem while serving in the trenches outside Ypres during the First World
      War - In Flanders Fields.

      Prince Philip stopped to speak with Canadian Lieut. Gordon Douglas, who was
      standing guard. "He asked me where I am from and I told him, and then he
      asked what we were doing on the rest of our trip," Douglas said.

      "I told him that we were here to bury dead soldiers. It was lucky to be
      singled out by the prince but the real honour is just being here today."

      The Canadian delegation will participate in remembrance ceremonies in France
      and Belgium this weekend. >>


      93rd SHRoFLHU
      THE Thin Red Line
      www.93rdhighlanders.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • PEGGY MATHEWS
      Someone please educate the uninformed about the history, significance and protocol for the Last Post. At the last Mississinewa one night we heard it played
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 1, 2001
        Someone please educate the uninformed about the history, significance and protocol for the Last Post. At the last Mississinewa one night we heard it played and some of the honorable gentlemen around me came to attention and/or saluted, remaining so till the last note drifted away. I stood there like an ignorant clod not knowing how to behave, just adopting a hopefully respectful silence.

        Kindly enlighten me.

        Thanks,
        Michael

        I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post sounded on
        bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
        (big snip)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Peter Catley
        The event was reported in the UK papers although not very extensively. I agree with the others that to visit the Menin Gate is a most moving experience, the
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
          The event was reported in the UK papers although not very extensively. I
          agree with the others that to visit the Menin Gate is a most moving
          experience, the power of the monument has enormous eloquence. I was there
          last year on 11 November and the whole place was full of memorial wreaths
          but the most moving were the individual poppies put next to individual
          names.

          The fallen of the Commonwealth of Nations must not be forgotten.

          Peter Catley

          Subject: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

          I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post sounded on
          bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
          Combined with the sight of all those tens of thousands of names inscribed on
          the massive walls of the memorial Gate (along with just as many at nearby
          Tyne Cot cemetery), it is something one never forgets....

          B

          In a message dated 1/11/01 3:25:58 PM, gam1947@... writes:

          << Ladies and Gentlemen,

          The clipping below is from Canada, in the electronic newspapers on the web
          there is nothing about it from Australia, Britain, NZ, and this is the only
          one in the Canadian media. One would hope that it was in the actual print
          copies!

          Quite sad.

          Yours,
          G/.
        • Peter Catley
          Michael, In the UK the last post is played at the burial of a soldier to signify the passing over from the earthly world to the heavenly. It has become normal
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
            Michael,

            In the UK the last post is played at the burial of a soldier to signify the
            passing over from the earthly world to the heavenly. It has become normal
            for it to be played at remembrance services to signify the start of the
            respectful silence.

            It is a most haunting tune and played well it can be extremely emotional.
            Your response was the appropriate one, one stands to attention faces the
            front. If in uniform you salute.

            As for the history I don't know when the tradition started but I would guess
            that it was probably early Victorian but Tim or Benton may know more about
            it.

            It is perhaps one of our better and simpler ceremonies.

            I am slightly surprised that it is not a feature in Canada.

            Peter Catley

            -----Original Message-----
            From: PEGGY MATHEWS [mailto:ciefranche21e@...]
            Sent: 02 November 2001 04:10
            To: 1812elist
            Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

            Someone please educate the uninformed about the history, significance and
            protocol for the Last Post. At the last Mississinewa one night we heard it
            played and some of the honorable gentlemen around me came to attention
            and/or saluted, remaining so till the last note drifted away. I stood there
            like an ignorant clod not knowing how to behave, just adopting a hopefully
            respectful silence.

            Kindly enlighten me.

            Thanks,
            Michael

            I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post sounded on
            bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
            (big snip)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


            The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
            square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
            square miles...

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Bateman, Andrew
            ... Yes, we have it in Canada. Every November 11 at 11:00am we have ceremonies across the country where Last Post is played, followed by a minute of silence,
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
              > -----Original Message-----

              > From: Peter Catley [mailto:peter.catley@...]
              > I am slightly surprised that it is not a feature in Canada.
              >
              > Peter Catley

              Yes, we have it in Canada. Every November 11 at 11:00am we have ceremonies
              across the country where Last Post is played, followed by a minute of
              silence, followed by Reveille. Usually there is a piper in there somewhere
              playing "Lament".

              Andrew Bateman, 1/41st
            • red.gold@sympatico.ca
              ... sounded on ... inscribed on ... nearby ... the web ... the only ... actual print ... As you will note, thia item was a product of The Canadian Press. It
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
                --- In WarOf1812@y..., HQ93rd@a... wrote:
                > I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post
                sounded on
                > bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
                > Combined with the sight of all those tens of thousands of names
                inscribed on
                > the massive walls of the memorial Gate (along with just as many at
                nearby
                > Tyne Cot cemetery), it is something one never forgets....
                >
                > B
                >
                > In a message dated 1/11/01 3:25:58 PM, gam1947@d... writes:
                >
                > << Ladies and Gentlemen,
                >
                > The clipping below is from Canada, in the electronic newspapers on
                the web
                > there is nothing about it from Australia, Britain, NZ, and this is
                the only
                > one in the Canadian media. One would hope that it was in the
                actual print
                > copies!
                >
                > Quite sad.
                >
                > Yours,
                > G/.
                >
                > Thursday, November 1, 2001 The Halifax Herald Limited
                > --------------------------------------------------------------------
                --------
                > Commonwealth soldiers honoured in Ypres
                > Nova Scotia Highlanders among those to pay tribute to fallen
                >
                > Virginia Mayo / The Associated Press
                > By Roberta Cowan / The Canadian Press
                >
                >
                As you will note, thia item was a product of The Canadian Press. It
                actually passed through my ink-stained paws in my capacity as an
                editor on the World Desk there.
                CP always makes an effort to cover Remembrance Day activities to as
                full an extent as our limited resources allow.
                It was relayed to all of the major newspapers in Canada who are our
                clients, as well as databases and Internet newspages who buy our
                content We have no control over who chooses to actually publish the
                material but I suspect it would have been given wide play.
                Canada's sacrifice in both world wars was disproportionately large
                for our population and most families of the time were scarred by the
                loss or serious injury of at least one member.
                Both of my grandfathers were wounded in the First War and my dad
                survived a bomb blast in Naples in the Second.
                T.Avery.
              • PEGGY MATHEWS
                Thanks Peter, I understand better now. Michael ... From: Peter Catley Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 3:37 AM To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com Subject: RE:
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
                  Thanks Peter, I understand better now.

                  Michael

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Peter Catley
                  Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 3:37 AM
                  To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

                  Michael,

                  In the UK the last post is played at the burial of a soldier to signify the
                  passing over from the earthly world to the heavenly. It has become normal
                  for it to be played at remembrance services to signify the start of the
                  respectful silence.

                  It is a most haunting tune and played well it can be extremely emotional.
                  Your response was the appropriate one, one stands to attention faces the
                  front. If in uniform you salute.

                  As for the history I don't know when the tradition started but I would guess
                  that it was probably early Victorian but Tim or Benton may know more about
                  it.

                  It is perhaps one of our better and simpler ceremonies.

                  I am slightly surprised that it is not a feature in Canada.

                  Peter Catley

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: PEGGY MATHEWS [mailto:ciefranche21e@...]
                  Sent: 02 November 2001 04:10
                  To: 1812elist
                  Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres

                  Someone please educate the uninformed about the history, significance and
                  protocol for the Last Post. At the last Mississinewa one night we heard it
                  played and some of the honorable gentlemen around me came to attention
                  and/or saluted, remaining so till the last note drifted away. I stood there
                  like an ignorant clod not knowing how to behave, just adopting a hopefully
                  respectful silence.

                  Kindly enlighten me.

                  Thanks,
                  Michael

                  I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post sounded on
                  bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
                  (big snip)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                  The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
                  square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
                  square miles...

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




                  The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • colsjtjones2000@yahoo.ca
                  I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn t exist in the 1812 period, but it is
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
                    I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
                    the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
                    1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
                    regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
                    advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
                    period. Doug


                    --- In WarOf1812@y..., "PEGGY MATHEWS" <ciefranche21e@m...> wrote:
                    > Thanks Peter, I understand better now.
                    >
                    > Michael
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: Peter Catley
                    > Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 3:37 AM
                    > To: WarOf1812@y...
                    > Subject: RE: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres
                    >
                    > Michael,
                    >
                    > In the UK the last post is played at the burial of a soldier to
                    signify the
                    > passing over from the earthly world to the heavenly. It has become
                    normal
                    > for it to be played at remembrance services to signify the start of
                    the
                    > respectful silence.
                    >
                    > It is a most haunting tune and played well it can be extremely
                    emotional.
                    > Your response was the appropriate one, one stands to attention
                    faces the
                    > front. If in uniform you salute.
                    >
                    > As for the history I don't know when the tradition started but I
                    would guess
                    > that it was probably early Victorian but Tim or Benton may know
                    more about
                    > it.
                    >
                    > It is perhaps one of our better and simpler ceremonies.
                    >
                    > I am slightly surprised that it is not a feature in Canada.
                    >
                    > Peter Catley
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: PEGGY MATHEWS [mailto:ciefranche21e@m...]
                    > Sent: 02 November 2001 04:10
                    > To: 1812elist
                    > Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres
                    >
                    > Someone please educate the uninformed about the history,
                    significance and
                    > protocol for the Last Post. At the last Mississinewa one night we
                    heard it
                    > played and some of the honorable gentlemen around me came to
                    attention
                    > and/or saluted, remaining so till the last note drifted away. I
                    stood there
                    > like an ignorant clod not knowing how to behave, just adopting a
                    hopefully
                    > respectful silence.
                    >
                    > Kindly enlighten me.
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Michael
                    >
                    > I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post
                    sounded on
                    > bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
                    > (big snip)
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
                    hundreds of
                    > square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
                    THOUSANDS of
                    > square miles...
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
                    hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
                    fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • colsjtjones2000@yahoo.ca
                    Peter - whatever you might assume from some postings, I can assure you that in Canada the Last Post is revered. It was most recently observed in a memorial
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
                      Peter - whatever you might assume from some postings, I can assure
                      you that in Canada the Last Post is revered. It was most recently
                      observed in a memorial for Sept 11th when I was in a Walmart store
                      and you could have heard a pin drop. At the same time there were
                      100,000 people on Parliament Hill observing the same silence - and
                      the same post.

                      In Canada our Memorial Day (Remembrance Day) is Nov 11th. The 11th
                      day of the 11th month. The Royal Canadian Legion "sells" poppies -
                      from Flanders Fields, although now they are plastic. In Canada at
                      this time of year one would be hard pressed to find a person not
                      wearing a poppy. On Nov 11th, there is always an impressive
                      remembrance ceremony at the National War Memorial, which is usually
                      televised on CPAC and NW, and which I would encourage everyone to
                      watch.

                      Doug






                      --- In WarOf1812@y..., "Peter Catley" <peter.catley@b...> wrote:
                      > Michael,
                      >
                      > In the UK the last post is played at the burial of a soldier to
                      signify the
                      > passing over from the earthly world to the heavenly. It has become
                      normal
                      > for it to be played at remembrance services to signify the start of
                      the
                      > respectful silence.
                      >
                      > It is a most haunting tune and played well it can be extremely
                      emotional.
                      > Your response was the appropriate one, one stands to attention
                      faces the
                      > front. If in uniform you salute.
                      >
                      > As for the history I don't know when the tradition started but I
                      would guess
                      > that it was probably early Victorian but Tim or Benton may know
                      more about
                      > it.
                      >
                      > It is perhaps one of our better and simpler ceremonies.
                      >
                      > I am slightly surprised that it is not a feature in Canada.
                      >
                      > Peter Catley
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: PEGGY MATHEWS [mailto:ciefranche21e@m...]
                      > Sent: 02 November 2001 04:10
                      > To: 1812elist
                      > Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres
                      >
                      > Someone please educate the uninformed about the history,
                      significance and
                      > protocol for the Last Post. At the last Mississinewa one night we
                      heard it
                      > played and some of the honorable gentlemen around me came to
                      attention
                      > and/or saluted, remaining so till the last note drifted away. I
                      stood there
                      > like an ignorant clod not knowing how to behave, just adopting a
                      hopefully
                      > respectful silence.
                      >
                      > Kindly enlighten me.
                      >
                      > Thanks,
                      > Michael
                      >
                      > I have stood at the Menin Gate in "Wipers" and heard Last Post
                      sounded on
                      > bugles by the local Belgian constabulary.
                      > (big snip)
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
                      hundreds of
                      > square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of
                      THOUSANDS of
                      > square miles...
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    • John-Paul Johnson
                      ... Are you sure that The Last Post didn t exist then? I got this from the ANZAC day website: Last Post The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the
                      Message 10 of 12 , Nov 2, 2001
                        olsjtjones2000@... wrote:
                        >
                        > I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
                        > the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
                        > 1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
                        > regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
                        > advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
                        > period. Doug
                        >

                        Are you sure that "The Last Post" didn't exist then?

                        I got this from the ANZAC day website:

                        Last Post

                        The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the end of day
                        traditions which include Beating the Retreat and Tattoo.
                        Retreat is the older custom dating back to the 16th Century and
                        consisting of prolonged drum beating at sunset to warn the night guard
                        to mount and also to give notice that the gates of the town walls were
                        about to close. This custom was also part of the end of day battle
                        procedure when volleys were fired and a hymn played in honour of those
                        who had fallen during the day. At this time of evening the colour would
                        be trooped. Today this latter activity is replaced by the lowering of
                        the National Flag.

                        There is some confusion over the ‘post’ calls. It seems that the ‘First
                        Post’ and 'Last Post' came into being in the early part of the 19th
                        Century. The ‘First Post’ was sounded as the orderly officer, the
                        orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo. They
                        then marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum. Upon
                        reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. (This is
                        why drummers carry a bugle.)

                        The Last Post was really the end of the day (a hard day’s fighting and a
                        hard night’s drinking).

                        This bugle call has been passed down through the centuries in many
                        countries of the world as an accompaniment to the impressive rites of a
                        soldier’s farewell - the closing bars wail out their sad valediction to
                        the departing warrior.
                        ----------------

                        This matches well with what I was taught during my Basic Officer Course
                        lo these many years ago.

                        J-P Johnson
                        Royal Nfld Reg't
                        --------------
                        J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/
                      • Chewie
                        While at RHS the first post was played by bugler in morning and the colours were taken down with calls upon the Bosun s Call at the end of the day . Obviously
                        Message 11 of 12 , Nov 3, 2001
                          While at RHS the first post was played by bugler in morning and the colours were taken down with calls upon the Bosun's Call at the end of the day . Obviously the Bowfin's call cannot play the last post , so the bugle should have been there . It was a Naval establishment .

                          Chewie
                          unit commander
                          50th West Kent Regiment Re Enactment Unit
                          " not a good looking bunch , but devilish steady"
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: John-Paul Johnson
                          To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 9:40 PM
                          Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres


                          olsjtjones2000@... wrote:
                          >
                          > I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
                          > the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
                          > 1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
                          > regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
                          > advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
                          > period. Doug
                          >

                          Are you sure that "The Last Post" didn't exist then?

                          I got this from the ANZAC day website:

                          Last Post

                          The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the end of day
                          traditions which include Beating the Retreat and Tattoo.
                          Retreat is the older custom dating back to the 16th Century and
                          consisting of prolonged drum beating at sunset to warn the night guard
                          to mount and also to give notice that the gates of the town walls were
                          about to close. This custom was also part of the end of day battle
                          procedure when volleys were fired and a hymn played in honour of those
                          who had fallen during the day. At this time of evening the colour would
                          be trooped. Today this latter activity is replaced by the lowering of
                          the National Flag.

                          There is some confusion over the 'post' calls. It seems that the 'First
                          Post' and 'Last Post' came into being in the early part of the 19th
                          Century. The 'First Post' was sounded as the orderly officer, the
                          orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo. They
                          then marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum. Upon
                          reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. (This is
                          why drummers carry a bugle.)

                          The Last Post was really the end of the day (a hard day's fighting and a
                          hard night's drinking).

                          This bugle call has been passed down through the centuries in many
                          countries of the world as an accompaniment to the impressive rites of a
                          soldier's farewell - the closing bars wail out their sad valediction to
                          the departing warrior.
                          ----------------

                          This matches well with what I was taught during my Basic Officer Course
                          lo these many years ago.

                          J-P Johnson
                          Royal Nfld Reg't
                          --------------
                          J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/

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                          The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...

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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Chewie
                          Sorry My memory is slipping . during evening ceremony bugler was there . The sequence was Bosun s Call played Still , then bugler played last post , Followed
                          Message 12 of 12 , Nov 3, 2001
                            Sorry
                            My memory is slipping . during evening ceremony bugler was there . The sequence was Bosun's Call played Still , then bugler played last post , Followed by Call again playing Carry On .
                            Again apologies for this Fau Parr . Brain approaching 40 .

                            Chewie
                            unit commander
                            50th West Kent Regiment Re Enactment Unit
                            " not a good looking bunch , but devilish steady"
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: Chewie
                            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Saturday, November 03, 2001 4:44 PM
                            Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres


                            While at RHS the first post was played by bugler in morning and the colours were taken down with calls upon the Bosun's Call at the end of the day . Obviously the Bowfin's call cannot play the last post , so the bugle should have been there . It was a Naval establishment .

                            Chewie
                            unit commander
                            50th West Kent Regiment Re Enactment Unit
                            " not a good looking bunch , but devilish steady"
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: John-Paul Johnson
                            To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 9:40 PM
                            Subject: Re: [WarOf1812] Re: Fwd: [britregiments] Ypres


                            olsjtjones2000@... wrote:
                            >
                            > I cannot understand why someone in our activity did not appreciate
                            > the significance of the Last Post. Of course it didn't exist in the
                            > 1812 period, but it is used in all memorials which we conduct now,
                            > regardless of period. Perhaps more informed people than me could
                            > advise what would have been similarly appropriate in our 1812
                            > period. Doug
                            >

                            Are you sure that "The Last Post" didn't exist then?

                            I got this from the ANZAC day website:

                            Last Post

                            The bugle call Last Post is inextricably part of the end of day
                            traditions which include Beating the Retreat and Tattoo.
                            Retreat is the older custom dating back to the 16th Century and
                            consisting of prolonged drum beating at sunset to warn the night guard
                            to mount and also to give notice that the gates of the town walls were
                            about to close. This custom was also part of the end of day battle
                            procedure when volleys were fired and a hymn played in honour of those
                            who had fallen during the day. At this time of evening the colour would
                            be trooped. Today this latter activity is replaced by the lowering of
                            the National Flag.

                            There is some confusion over the 'post' calls. It seems that the 'First
                            Post' and 'Last Post' came into being in the early part of the 19th
                            Century. The 'First Post' was sounded as the orderly officer, the
                            orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo. They
                            then marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum. Upon
                            reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. (This is
                            why drummers carry a bugle.)

                            The Last Post was really the end of the day (a hard day's fighting and a
                            hard night's drinking).

                            This bugle call has been passed down through the centuries in many
                            countries of the world as an accompaniment to the impressive rites of a
                            soldier's farewell - the closing bars wail out their sad valediction to
                            the departing warrior.
                            ----------------

                            This matches well with what I was taught during my Basic Officer Course
                            lo these many years ago.

                            J-P Johnson
                            Royal Nfld Reg't
                            --------------
                            J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/

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