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US Artillery question

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  • nappingcrow@hotmail.com
    Hello, Does anyone know if the United States manufactured domestic versions of the RN carronade? I ve run across a reference to use (or planned use) of 42
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 1, 2001
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      Hello,

      Does anyone know if the United States manufactured domestic versions
      of the RN carronade? I've run across a reference to use (or planned
      use) of 42 pdr. carronades on US row galleys on the Great Lakes in
      1814.

      Were these just another name for the heavy American "Columbiad" shell
      gun? Did we have a large inventory of captured RN carronades to use?

      Thanks,
      Brian S.
    • colsjtjones2000@yahoo.ca
      I believe the US manufactured both guns and carronades (I doubt that captures could account for the numbers of carronades employed). The columbiad was a US
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 1, 2001
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        I believe the US manufactured both guns and carronades (I doubt that
        captures could account for the numbers of carronades employed). The
        columbiad was a US design intermediate between the two. Teddy
        Roosevelt equates a long 12 to a columbiad 18 to a 32 pdr carronade,
        when firing solid shot(he doesn't mention columbiads with shell). In
        the balance of his book "The Naval War of 1812" columbiads don't seem
        to be mentioned again. Perhaps they were used more in shore
        batteries than in the navy.

        Bob Malcomson (Warships of the Great Lakes) states that Macdonough's
        use of some 18 pdr columbiads on Lake Champlain to be the only
        documented use on the Great Lakes.

        Teddy also stated that guns from US foundries were more likely to
        burst than those of the British. I know that foundries in the
        Canadas were not able to produce guns at all, primarily due to the
        low grade of iron ore available to them, so that British ships on the
        Great Lakes were armed exclusively by guns of British manufacture.

        Hope this is of some help.

        Doug


        --- In WarOf1812@y..., nappingcrow@h... wrote:
        > Hello,
        >
        > Does anyone know if the United States manufactured domestic
        versions
        > of the RN carronade? I've run across a reference to use (or
        planned
        > use) of 42 pdr. carronades on US row galleys on the Great Lakes in
        > 1814.
        >
        > Were these just another name for the heavy American "Columbiad"
        shell
        > gun? Did we have a large inventory of captured RN carronades to
        use?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Brian S.
      • nappingcrow@hotmail.com
        It would make sense that they would copy the British design (use what works) - I ve just never seen them mentioned in the USN before this. Thanks for the info
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 1, 2001
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          It would make sense that they would copy the British design (use what
          works) - I've just never seen them mentioned in the USN before this.

          Thanks for the info on columbiads! I haven't been able to find out
          much about them - so far the largest description I've seen has been
          from Roger Sarty's "Coast Artillery 1815-1914". He says they
          predated the War of 1812 by a few years, and were capable of firing
          both solid shot and explosive shells before the invention of the
          Paixhans gun. That, and they came in 50 and 100pdr sizes and were
          used as coastal artillery, so they didn't sound like likely
          candidates for widespread use by the navy.

          I'm interested in the Congreve gun - where can I find out more?

          Thanks,
          Brian S.
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