Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [WarOf1812] Sharpe

Expand Messages
  • petemonahan@aol.com
    euan What do we think of Sharpe? Great military soap opera -I ve read and own them all- but not exactly 100% H.A.! Also, as The Sharpe Site points out, the
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
      euan
      What do we think of Sharpe? Great military soap opera -I've read and own
      them all- but not exactly 100% H.A.! Also, as "The Sharpe Site" points out,
      the man has more than even the proverbial 9 lives. ( One of their pages lists
      all his wounds - his surface scars alone must look like a road map of the
      Peninsula!) And the plots get a wee bit predictable, especially the
      improbable, doomed from the start lust interest.

      Having said all that, will I read the next one? You betcha!

      Peter Monahan,
      Royal Nfld. Reg't
    • Larry Lozon
      From: thecheetah What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books? ....................................... Euan: take
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
        From: "thecheetah" <euan.wilkinson@...>

        What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?
        .......................................

        Euan:

        take a tour through

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WarOf1812/messages

        this subject raises it's head every six to eight months!
        ~ there are mega postings on this subject

        enjoy :-)
      • colsjtjones2000@yahoo.ca
        Michael - I thought you were right on in your response. I have enjoyed the Sharpe novels, but I take them with a grain of salt - and I often cringe when
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 2, 2001
          Michael - I thought you were right on in your response. I have
          enjoyed the Sharpe novels, but I take them with a grain of salt -
          and I often cringe when Cornwell takes too much license with
          historical fact. I have enjoyed the TV series, although it takes
          even more license, and more cringing.

          Other people have cringed at Trafalgar. But Sharpe's description of
          the battle *itself* as really a non participant is not bad. Look at
          Cornwell's references for it - he certainly consulted the
          appropriate people.

          Doug


          --- In WarOf1812@y..., "PEGGY MATHEWS" <ciefranche21e@m...> wrote:
          > Well, where to begin? They are entertaining historical *fiction*,
          woven around the Napoleonic Wars and slightly beyond. They follow
          the traditional, stereotypical image of the crude gutter-lout British
          soldier, most of whom have a heart of gold inside. The officer corps
          are largely either incompetent ego-maniacs or noble lads usually
          destined for an early exit. The French are typically brave and
          dedicated (where's the glory in beating a weak foe?) with one
          sympathetic officer who inevitably dies and one despicable Frenchman
          who often lingers through several books. The Spanish are usually
          portrayed in the worst possible light, once again in keeping with the
          popular stereotype.
          >
          > There are factual errors both in terms of the armies and the
          tactics, though as a recurring theme it seems to be in order to
          perpetuate the popular myths.
          >
          > Sharpe is not totally a superman, as he sometimes misses, sometimes
          has a misfire, and is frequently wounded. Though as a hero he will
          survive near certain death at least once a book, usually in a
          plausible manner. He is sometimes outsmarted in the short term, but
          his street smarts will always prevail in the end.
          >
          > As is often the case with a successful series, the author has taken
          Sharpie (I love the character of Sgt. Hakeswill, especially as played
          in the TV series) to too many places, and been at the heart of too
          many events. I followed him through the Peninsula to South America,
          and then back to India. but when he showed up at Trafalgar I dropped
          out. Perhaps when I've read everything else pending in my library....
          >
          > The TV series did more good than harm IMO. While perpetuating some
          myths it also created a renewed interest in the Peninsula War and as
          a sideline, reenacting. It then behooves us to take the interested
          neophyte and lead them to the correct path(s).
          >
          > Hope this helps.
          >
          > Michael
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: thecheetah
          > Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2001 7:04 AM
          > To: WarOf1812@y...
          > Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe
          >
          > What do you guys think of the Sharpe Series of books?
          >
          >
          >
          > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
          hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
          fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Larry Lozon
          From: Raymond Hobbs ... ..................... We didn t have our eyes on you Sharpie! Cuz last night it was HORNBLOWER The Duel on
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 1, 2002
            From: "Raymond Hobbs" <ray.hobbs@...>


            > Interesting that the 24th (and indeed the 23rd - Royal Welch Fusliers)
            > were present at so many battles in the Peninsula - yet they are
            > completely ignored by Bernard Cornwell in his Sharpe books.
            .....................

            We didn't have our eyes on you Sharpie!

            Cuz last night it was HORNBLOWER "The Duel"
            on the telly
          • Peter Catley
            Cornwall ignores almost all the Regiments in the Peninsula. He only really mentions the rifle regiments and the fictious South Essex . The 1/23rd (Royal Welsh
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 1, 2002
              Cornwall ignores almost all the Regiments in the Peninsula. He only really
              mentions the rifle regiments and the fictious "South Essex".

              The 1/23rd (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) and 2/24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiments
              have a fine history in the Peninsula war. I don't know off hand where the
              1/24th served at this period.

              Peter Catley

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Larry Lozon [mailto:lalozon@...]
              Sent: 01 March 2002 21:24
              To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [WarOf1812] Sharpe

              From: "Raymond Hobbs" <ray.hobbs@...>


              > Interesting that the 24th (and indeed the 23rd - Royal Welch Fusliers)
              > were present at so many battles in the Peninsula - yet they are
              > completely ignored by Bernard Cornwell in his Sharpe books.
              .....................

              We didn't have our eyes on you Sharpie!

              Cuz last night it was HORNBLOWER "The Duel"
              on the telly




















              The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
              square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
              square miles...

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.